Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe

Author: Professor Claire Jowitt
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409461742
Format: PDF, Docs
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Richard Hakluyt, best known as editor of The Principal Navigations (1589; expanded 1598-1600), was a key figure in promoting early modern English colonial and commercial expansion. His work spanned every area of English activity and aspiration, from Muscovy to America, from Africa to the Near East, and India to China and Japan, providing up-to-date information and establishing an ideological framework for English rivalries with Spain, Portugal, France, and the Netherlands. This interdisciplinary collection of 24 essays brings together the best international scholarship on Hakluyt, revising our picture of the influences on his work, his editorial practice and his impact.

Travel Agency and the Circulation of Knowledge

Author: Gesa Mackenthun
Publisher: Waxmann Verlag
ISBN: 3830985673
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Ever since the Gilgamesh epic and Homer's Odyssey, stories of travel and adventure, whether 'fictional', 'factual', or a mix of both, have been crucial to the collective self-definition of human societies. Since the early modern period and the increased frequency of cross-cultural encounters, the literary motif of the journey became a significant ingredient of colonial imagination. The ideology of adventure, crucial to many works of literature, pervades Western discourses of economic expansion and scientific discovery, while anthropologists, seeking to document indigenous story traditions, encountered an oral archive not unlike that of their own. Travelistic texts (by 'culture heroes', explorers, colonial agents, missionaries, scientific explorers, refugees, and foreign visitors) often provide the semantic repertoire for descriptions of 'exotic' spaces and populations. The knowledge gained through physical encounters during journeys to foreign lands often functions to revise inherited ideas about 'cultures' - those of others as well as one's own. The topics 'travel' and 'travel writing' therefore invite us to address questions of reliability and verifiability. This volume brings together experts from diverse disciplines and places around the globe whose work is concerned with the phenomenon and discourse of travel, transculturation, and the cross-cultural production of knowledge. The contributions reflect the recent shift in travel scholarship toward including the study of ideological conflicts within Europe's 'imperial gaze', as well as attempts at tracing the perspective of Europe's 'others', which frequently challenged colonial certainties and claims to intellectual supremacy.

Life Writing in Reformation Europe

Author: Irena Backus
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317105184
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Reformation period witnessed an explosion in the number of biographies of contemporary religious figures being published. Whether lives of reformers worthy of emulation, or heretics deserving condemnation, the genre of biography became a key element in the confessional rivalries that raged across Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Offering more than a general survey of Life writing, this volume examines key issues and questions about how this trend developed among different confessions and how it helped shape lasting images of reformers, particularly Luther and Calvin up to the modern period. This is the first-ever full length study of the subject showing that Lives of the reformers constitute an integral part of the intellectual and cultural history of the period, serving as an important source of information about the different Reformations. Depending on their origin, they provide a lesson in theology but also in civic values and ideals of education of the period. Genevan Lives in particular also point up the delicate issue of 'Reformed hagiography' which their authors try to avoid with a varying degree of success. Having consistently been at the forefront of the study of the intellectual history of the Reformation Irena Backus is perfectly placed to highlight the importance of Life writing. This is a path-breaking study that will open up a new way of viewing the confessional conflicts of the period and their historiography.

Iran Between Two Revolutions

Author: Ervand Abrahamian
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691101347
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In this examination of the social bases of Iranian politics, Professor Abrahamian draws on archives of the British Foreign Office and India Office that have only recently been opened; newspaper, memoirs and biographies published in Tehran between 1906 and 1980; proceedings of the Iranian Majles and Senate; interviews with retired and active politicians and pamphlets, books and periodicals distributed by exiled groups in Europe and North America in the period between 1953 and 1980.

The Poetics of Piracy

Author: Barbara Fuchs
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812207769
Format: PDF, Mobi
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With its dominance as a European power and the explosion of its prose and dramatic writing, Spain provided an irresistible literary source for English writers of the early modern period. But the deep and escalating political rivalry between the two nations led English writers to negotiate, disavow, or attempt to resolve their fascination with Spain and their debt to Spanish sources. Amid thorny issues of translation and appropriation, imperial competition, the rise of commercial authorship, and anxieties about authenticity, Barbara Fuchs traces how Spanish material was transmitted into English writing, entangling English literature in questions of national and religious identity, and how piracy came to be a central textual metaphor, with appropriations from Spain triumphantly reimagined as heroic looting. From the time of the attempted invasion by the Spanish Armada of the 1580s, through the rise of anti-Spanish rhetoric of the 1620s, The Poetics of Piracy charts this connection through works by Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, and Thomas Middleton. Fuchs examines how their writing, particularly for the stage, recasts a reliance on Spanish material by constructing narratives of militaristic, forcible use. She considers how Jacobean dramatists complicated the texts of their Spanish contemporaries by putting them to anti-Spanish purposes, and she traces the place of Cervantes's Don Quixote in Beaumont's The Knight of the Burning Pestle and Shakespeare's late, lost play Cardenio. English literature was deeply transnational, even in the period most closely associated with the birth of a national literature. Recovering the profound influence of Spain on Renaissance English letters, The Poetics of Piracy paints a sophisticated picture of how nations can serve, at once, as rivals and resources.