Risk and Sociocultural Theory

Author: Deborah Lupton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521645546
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This 1999 book presents a variety of exciting perspectives on the perception of risk and the strategies that people adopt to cope with it. Using the framework of recent social and cultural theory, it reflects the fact that risk has become integral to contemporary understandings of selfhood, the body and social relations, and is central to the work of writers such as Douglas, Beck, Giddens and the Foucauldian theorists. The contributors are all leading scholars in the fields of sociology, cultural and media studies and cultural anthropology. Combining empirical analyses with metatheoretical critiques, they tackle an unusually diverse range of topics including drug use, risk in the workplace, fear of crime and the media, risk and pregnant embodiment, the social construction of danger in childhood, anxieties about national identity, the governmental uses of risk and the relationship between risk phenomena and social order.

Risk and Everyday Life

Author: John Tulloch
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446239411
Format: PDF, ePub
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Risk and Everyday Life examines how people respond to, experience and think about risk as part of their everyday lives. Bringing together original empirical research and sociocultural theory, the authors examine how people define risk and what risks they see as affecting them, for example in relation to immigration, employment and family life. They emphasise the need to take account of the cultural dimensions of risk and risk-taking to understand how risk is experienced as part of everyday life and consider the influence that gender, social class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, occupation, geographical location and nationality have on our perceptions and experience of risk. Drawing on the work of key theorists - Ulrich Beck, Scott Lash, and Mary Douglas - the authors examine and critique theories of risk in the light of their own research and presents case studies which show how notions of risk interact with day-to-day concerns.

Risk

Author: Deborah Lupton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135090319
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Risk (second edition) is a fully revised and expanded update of a highly-cited, influential and well-known book. It reviews the three major approaches to risk in social and cultural theory, devoting a chapter to each one. These approaches were first identified and described by Deborah Lupton in the original edition and have since become widely used as a categorisation of risk perspectives. The first draws upon the work of Mary Douglas to articulate the ‘cultural/symbolic’ perspective on risk. The second approach is that of the ‘risk society’ perspective, based on the writings of Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens. The third approach explored here is that of the ‘governmentality’ perspective, which builds on Michel Foucault’s work. Other chapters examine in detail the relationship between concepts of risk and concepts of selfhood and the body, the notion of Otherness and how this influences the ways in which people respond to and think about risk, and the pleasures of voluntary risk-taking, including discussion of edgework. This new edition examines these themes in relation to the newly emerging threats of the twenty-first century, such as climate change, extreme weather events, terrorism and global financial crises. It will appeal to students and scholars throughout the social sciences and humanities.

The Risk of Regional Governance

Author: Thomas Skuzinski
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315304015
Format: PDF, ePub
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Creating metropolitan regions that are more efficient, equitable, and sustainable depends on the willingness of local officials to work together across municipal boundaries to solve large-scale problems. How do these local officials think? Why do they only sometimes cooperate? What kind of governance do they choose in the face of persistent problems? The Risk of Regional Governance offers a new perspective on these questions. Drawing on theory from sociology and anthropology, it argues that many of the most important cooperative decisions local officials make—those about land use planning and regulation—are driven by heuristic, biased reasoning driven by cultural values. The Risk of Regional Governance builds a sociocultural collective action framework, and supports it with rich survey and interview data from hundreds of local elected officials serving in the suburbs of Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is a story of the Rust Belt, of how local officials think about their community and the region, and—most importantly—of how we might craft policies that can overcome biases against regional governance.

Eating Out

Author: Alan Warde
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521599696
Format: PDF
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Eating Out, first published in 2000, is a fascinating study of the consumption of food outside the home, based on extensive original research carried out in England in the 1990s. Reflecting the explosion of interest in food, ranging from food scares to the national obsession with celebrity chefs, the practice of eating out has increased dramatically over recent years. Through surveys and intensive interviews, the authors have collected a wealth of information into people's attitudes towards, and expectations of, eating out as a form of entertainment and an expression of taste and status. Amongst other topics they examine social inequalities in access to eating out, social distinction, interactions between customers and staff, and the economic and social implications of the practice. Eating Out will be a valuable resource to academics, advanced students and practitioners in the sociology of consumption, cultural studies, social anthropology, tourism and hospitality, home economics, marketing, and the general reader.

The Handbook of Sociocultural Anthropology

Author: James G. Carrier
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472520068
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Handbook of Sociocultural Anthropology presents a state of the art overview of the subject - its methodologies, current debates, history and future. It provides the ultimate source of authoritative, critical descriptions of all the key aspects of the discipline as well as a consideration of the general state of the discipline at a time when there is notable uncertainty about its foundations, composition and direction. Divided into five core sections, the Handbook: examines the changing theoretical and analytical orientations that have led to new ways of carrying out research; presents an analysis of the traditional historical core and how the discipline has changed since 1980; considers the ethnographic regions where work has had the greatest impact on anthropology as a whole; outlines the people and institutions that are the context in which the discipline operates, covering topics from research funding to professional ethics. Bringing together leading international scholars, the Handbook provides a guide to the latest research in social and cultural anthropology. Presenting a systematic overview - and offering a wide range of examples, insights and analysis - it is an invaluable resource for researchers and students in anthropology as well as cultural and social geography, cultural studies and sociology.

The Culture of Adolescent Risk taking

Author: Cynthia Lightfoot
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 9781572302327
Format: PDF
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Based on interviews with forty-one teenagers, Lightfoot argues that adolescent risk-taking is necessary in establishing a sense of self and peer group identities

Ulrich Beck

Author: Gabe Mythen
Publisher: Pluto Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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A critical introduction to the theory of risk, reviewing the contribution of leading sociologist, Ulrich Beck.

Education and the Risk Society

Author: Steven Bialostok
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9460919618
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Sociological and anthropological literature has examined how contemporary western society has become a “risk society.” Education and the Risk Society is the first volume to explore this seminal concept through the lens of education. Drawing on a theoretical literature that has great potential as a lens to view changes in neoliberal discourses of global capitalism from both critical and generative perspectives, Education and the Risk Society presents situated, empirical studies investigating an uncertain world as people practice it on the ground, through language and activity, within educational settings.

At Risk

Author: Karen Swift
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802094996
Format: PDF
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In At Risk, Karen J. Swift and Marilyn Callahan examine risk and risk assessment in the context of professional practice in child protection, social work, and other human services. They argue that the tools, technologies, and practices used to measure risk to the individual have gone unquestioned and unstudied and that current methods of risk assessment may be distorting the principles of social justice. Central to this study is an examination of the everyday experiences of workers and parents engaged in risk assessment processes in Canadian child welfare investigations. Going beyond theory, Swift and Callahan highlight how risk evaluations play out in actual interactions with vulnerable people. Pointing out that standardized risk assessment tools do not take factors such as class, race, gender, and culture into account, At Risk raises important questions about the viability of risk management plans that are not tailored to individual situations.