Salmon Without Rivers

Author: Jim Lichatowich
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781559633611
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Looks at salmon restoration efforts, including the role of hatcheries, public policy, and the economics of the Pacific Northwest.

Salmon Without Rivers

Author: James A. Lichatowich
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1597268895
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From a mountain top where an eagle carries a salmon carcass to feed its young to the oceanic waters of the California current and the Alaskan Gyre, salmon have penetrated the Northwest to an extent unmatched by other animals. Since the turn of the twentieth century, natural productivity of salmon in Oregon, Washington, California, and Idaho has declined 80 percent. The decline of Pacific salmon to the brink of extinction is a sign of serious problems in the region. In Salmon Without Rivers, fisheries biologist Jim Lichatowich offers an eye-opening look at the roots and evolution of the salmon crisis in the Pacific Northwest. He describes the multitude of factors over the past century and a half that have led to the salmon's decline, and examines the failure of restoration efforts that have focused almost exclusively on hatcheries to return salmon stocks to healthy levels without addressing underlying causes of the decline. Lichatowich argues that the dominant worldview of our society -- a worldview that denies connections between humans and the natural world -- has created the conflict that characterizes the recent history of salmon; unless that worldview is challenged, there is little hope for recovery. Salmon Without Rivers exposes the myths that have guided recent human-salmon interactions. It explains the difficult choices facing citizens of the region, and provides unique insight into one of the most tragic chapters in our nation's environmental history.

Salmon Without Rivers

Author: Jim Lichatowich
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Looks at salmon restoration efforts, including the role of hatcheries, public policy, and the economics of the Pacific Northwest.

The Behavior and Ecology of Pacific Salmon and Trout

Author: Thomas P. Quinn
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774842431
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Behavior and Ecology of Pacific Salmon and Trout explains the patterns of mate choice, the competition for nest sites, and the fate of the salmon after their death. It describes the lives of offspring during the months they spend incubating in gravel, growing in fresh water, and migrating out to sea to mature. This thorough, up-to-date survey should be on the shelf of everyone with a professional or personal interest in Pacific salmon and trout. Written in a technically accurate but engaging style, it will appeal to a wide range of readers, including students, anglers, biologists, conservationists, legislators, and armchair naturalists.

Salmon People and Place

Author: Jim Lichatowich
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Each year wild Pacific salmon leave their oceanic feeding grounds and swim hundreds of miles back to their home rivers. The salmon's annual return is a place-defining event in the Pacific Northwest, with immense ecological, economic, and social significance. However, despite massive spending, efforts to significantly alter the endangered status of salmon have failed. In Salmon, People, and Place, acclaimed fisheries biologist Jim Lichatowich eloquently exposes the misconceptions underlying salmon management and recovery programs that have fueled the catastrophic decline in Northwest salmon populations for more than a century. These programs will continue to fail, he suggests, so long as they regard salmon as products and ignore their essential relationship with their habitat. But Lichatowich offers hope. In Salmon, People, and Place he presents a concrete plan for salmon recovery, one based on the myriad lessons learned from past mistakes. What is needed to successfully restore salmon, Lichatowich states, is an acute commitment to healing the relationships among salmon, people, and place. A significant contribution to the literature on Pacific salmon, Salmon, People, and Place: A Biologist's Search for Salmon Recovery is an essential read for anyone concerned about the fate of this Pacific Northwest icon.

Making Salmon

Author: Joseph E. Taylor III
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295989914
Format: PDF, ePub
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Winner of the George Perkins Marsh Award, American Society for Environmental History

A Common Fate

Author: Joseph Cone
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466884266
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Though life on earth is the history of dynamic interactions between living things and their surroundings, certain powerful groups would have us believe that nature exists only for our convenience. One consequence of such thinking is the apparent fate of the Pacific salmon--a key resource and preeminent symbol of America's wildlife--which is today threatened with extinction. Drawing on abundant data from natural science, Pacific coast culture, and a long association with key individuals on all sides of the issue, Joseph Cone's A Common Fate employs a clear narrative voice to tell the human and natural history of an environmental crisis in its final chapter. As inevitable as the November rains, countless millions of wild salmon returned from the ocean to spawn in the streams of their birth. In the wake of an orgy of dam building and habitat destruction, the salmon's majestic abundance has been reduced to a fleeting shadow. Neglect is the word the author uses to describe more recent losses, "by exactly the ones--state and federal fish managers--who should have acted." To signal a new awareness that action is needed, scientists charged with restocking the Columbia River Basin are receiving significant support, while ordinary citizens are beginning to recognize the relationship between cheap power and the absences of chinook, coho, sockeye, and other species from the coasts of Oregon and Washington and from Idaho's Snake River. As desperate as the salmon's future appears, the book is not an elegy for a lost resource. Instead, it bears witness to hope. In addition to concrete plans for the wild salmon's renewal, the reader will hear a growing chorus of informed individuals of differing values and beliefs who recognize that our fate is inextricably bound to the salmon's; for many it is a new understanding.

Mountain in the Clouds

Author: Bruce Brown
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295974750
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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It is now more than ten years since Bruce Brown began the Olympic Peninsula wanderings that led him to write this powerful account of how greed, indifference and environmental mismanagement have threatened the survival of the wild Pacific salmon and, as a result, the region’s ecology and its people. Acclaimed by critics who likened it to Coming Into the Country by John McPhee and Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Mountain in the Clouds has become a classic of natural history. As the struggle to protect Northwest salmon runs and the urgency of the fight against environmental deterioration escalates, Mountain in the Clouds remains an important and illuminating story, as timely now as when it was first written.

Recovering a Lost River

Author: Steven Hawley
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807004715
Format: PDF, Docs
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Focusing on the Snake River in Washington state, looks at the actions being taken to remove federally-funded hydroelectric dams from America's waterways and details the environmental, economic, and scientific benefits of dam removal and the powerful interests resisting this movement.