Sapelo

Author: Buddy Sullivan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780820350165
Format: PDF
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"Sapelo will be a resource to both scholars and general readers wishing to know more about the island's history. The book uses both primary and secondary sources to paint a picture of the island's many dimensions and discrete periods (e.g. ecological, Native American, Spanish mission, antebellum plantation, African-American, and twentieth century)"--

Island Time

Author: Jingle Davis
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820342459
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Capturing the history and beauty of a key destination in the land of the Golden Isles... Eighty miles south of Savannah lies St. Simons Island, one of the most beloved seaside destinations in Georgia and home to some twenty thousand year-round residents. In Island Time, Jingle Davis and Benjamin Galland offer a fascinating history and stunning visual celebration of this coastal community. Prehistoric people established some of North America's first permanent settlements on St. Simons, leaving three giant shell rings as evidence of their occupation. People from other diverse cultures also left their mark: Mocama and Guale Indians, Spanish friars, pirates and privateers, British soldiers and settlers, German religious refugees, and aristocratic antebellum planters. Enslaved Africans and their descendants forged the unique Gullah Geechee culture that survives today. Davis provides a comprehensive history of St. Simons, connecting its stories to broader historical moments. Timbers for Old Ironsides were hewn from St. Simons's live oaks during the Revolutionary War. Aaron Burr fled to St. Simons after killing Alexander Hamilton. Susie Baker King Taylor became the first black person to teach openly in a freedmen's school during her stay on the island. Rachel Carson spent time on St. Simons, which she wrote about in The Edge of the Sea. The island became a popular tourist destination in the 1800s, with visitors arriving on ferries until a causeway opened in 1924. Davis describes the challenges faced by the community with modern growth and explains how St. Simons has retained the unique charm and strong sense of community that it is known for today. Featuring more than two hundred contemporary photographs, historical images, and maps, Island Time is an essential book for people interested in the Georgia coast. A Friends Fund publication.

Sapelo Island

Author: Buddy Sullivan
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738505954
Format: PDF, Docs
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The barrier islands of the south Atlantic coastline have for years held a deep attraction for all who have come into contact with them. Few, however, can compare with the mystique of Sapelo Island, Georgia. This unique semitropical paradise evokes a time long forgotten, when antebellum cotton plantations dominated her landscape, all worked by hundreds of black slaves, the descendants of whom have lived in quiet solitude on the island for generations. For more than 50 years of the twentieth century, two millionaires held sway on Sapelo, and it is their story, interwoven with that of the island's residents, that unfolds within the pages of this book. Almost 200 photographs provide testimony to the dynamic forces and energies implanted upon Sapelo by two men, Howard E. Coffin, a Detroit automotive pioneer, and Richard J. Reynolds Jr., heir to a huge North Carolina tobacco fortune. Beginning with a photographic essay about Sapelo's antebellum plantation owner, Thomas Spalding, Sapelo Island moves into the primary focus of the story, the years from 1912 to 1964, an era of grandeur that has left a rich photographic legacy.

God Dr Buzzard and the Bolito Man

Author: Cornelia Walker Bailey
Publisher: Anchor Books
ISBN: 0385493770
Format: PDF
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Tells the story of how Sapelo island, now populated by the descendants of slaves, found itself locked in conflict with the state of Georgia while struggling to preserve its rich African American cultural heritage.

Sapelo Island s Hog Hammock

Author: Michele Nicole Johnson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738568478
Format: PDF, ePub
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Hog Hammock, located on Georgia's Sapelo Island, is only accessible by ferry or private boat. It is one of the last island-based Gullah-Geechee communities in America--a living connection to West African languages, folkways, and spiritual traditions. With its dirt roads and tin-roofed houses, Hog Hammock is the site of a social hall, two historic Baptist churches, and a former schoolhouse, all built by descendants of slaves. The nearby Behavior Cemetery has burial sites that date back 200 years. Much has been written about the people of Hog Hammock and Sapelo Island, mostly documenting their lives as slaves and then as landowning free people working for millionaires who reshaped Sapelo Island into their own personal retreats. But there is another part of the island's story, one filled with entrepreneurs, skilled craftsmen, and community leaders, that is told here in Images of America: Sapelo Island's Hog Hammock.

Making Gullah

Author: Melissa L. Cooper
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469632691
Format: PDF, Kindle
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During the 1920s and 1930s, anthropologists and folklorists became obsessed with uncovering connections between African Americans and their African roots. At the same time, popular print media and artistic productions tapped the new appeal of black folk life, highlighting African-styled voodoo as an essential element of black folk culture. A number of researchers converged on one site in particular, Sapelo Island, Georgia, to seek support for their theories about "African survivals," bringing with them a curious mix of both influences. The legacy of that body of research is the area's contemporary identification as a Gullah community. This wide-ranging history upends a long tradition of scrutinizing the Low Country blacks of Sapelo Island by refocusing the observational lens on those who studied them. Cooper uses a wide variety of sources to unmask the connections between the rise of the social sciences, the voodoo craze during the interwar years, the black studies movement, and black land loss and land struggles in coastal black communities in the Low Country. What emerges is a fascinating examination of Gullah people's heritage, and how it was reimagined and transformed to serve vastly divergent ends over the decades.

Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Georgia

Author: Linda G. Chafin
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780977962105
Format: PDF, Docs
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Abundantly illustrated with more than 400 color photographs and 200 detailed drawings, this comprehensive guide to the state's rare and endangered plants provides photographs and botanical illustrations in a single volume formatted for field use. More than 200 species are covered, including two dozen that are federally listed and 170-plus that are listed as Threatened, Endangered, Rare, or of Special Concern by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The guide is designed for easy, nontechnical identification of species in the field. Color photographs show the plants in their natural surroundings, and drawings emphasize the most distinctive parts of the plants. Packed with information about the plants as well as their habitats and management, the guide facilitates the quick recognition of rare species, encourages awareness of their distribution and ecological significance, and provides guidelines for ensuring their survival. Additional features include directions for using the guide, a map of Georgia's counties, descriptions of the natural communities of Georgia, references for further reading, a glossary of frequently used terms, and indexes of scientific and common plant names. The guide also includes a chapter by Jennifer Ceska and University of Georgia horticulture professor James Affolter, founding members of the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance, on horticultural requirements of rare species and the role of GPCA in their protection. This is a valuable resource for students, wildflower enthusiasts, botanists, land managers, and environmental decision makers. Each species account includes: one or more full-color photographs Georgia distribution map line drawing emphasizing such key field identification characters as leaf, stem, flower, and fruit scientific and common names legal and wetland status brief nontechnical description emphasizing key field identification characters flowering, fruiting, or sporulation period description of species habitat information on best survey season range-wide distribution Georgia conservation status management guidelines information on similar species and related rare species list of references