Sapelo

Author: Buddy Sullivan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780820350165
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
"Sapelo will be a resource to both scholars and general readers wishing to know more about the island's history. The book uses both primary and secondary sources to paint a picture of the island's many dimensions and discrete periods (e.g. ecological, Native American, Spanish mission, antebellum plantation, African-American, and twentieth century)"--

Sapelo s People

Author: William S. McFeely
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393313772
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Describes the experiences of the forebears of the Black inhabitants of Sapelo, an island off the coast of Georgia

Island Time

Author: Jingle Davis
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820342459
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Capturing the history and beauty of a key destination in the land of the Golden Isles... Eighty miles south of Savannah lies St. Simons Island, one of the most beloved seaside destinations in Georgia and home to some twenty thousand year-round residents. In Island Time, Jingle Davis and Benjamin Galland offer a fascinating history and stunning visual celebration of this coastal community. Prehistoric people established some of North America's first permanent settlements on St. Simons, leaving three giant shell rings as evidence of their occupation. People from other diverse cultures also left their mark: Mocama and Guale Indians, Spanish friars, pirates and privateers, British soldiers and settlers, German religious refugees, and aristocratic antebellum planters. Enslaved Africans and their descendants forged the unique Gullah Geechee culture that survives today. Davis provides a comprehensive history of St. Simons, connecting its stories to broader historical moments. Timbers for Old Ironsides were hewn from St. Simons's live oaks during the Revolutionary War. Aaron Burr fled to St. Simons after killing Alexander Hamilton. Susie Baker King Taylor became the first black person to teach openly in a freedmen's school during her stay on the island. Rachel Carson spent time on St. Simons, which she wrote about in The Edge of the Sea. The island became a popular tourist destination in the 1800s, with visitors arriving on ferries until a causeway opened in 1924. Davis describes the challenges faced by the community with modern growth and explains how St. Simons has retained the unique charm and strong sense of community that it is known for today. Featuring more than two hundred contemporary photographs, historical images, and maps, Island Time is an essential book for people interested in the Georgia coast. A Friends Fund publication.

God Dr Buzzard and the Bolito Man

Author: Cornelia Bailey
Publisher: Doubleday Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF
Download Now
A rich cultural memoir by a native of unique Sapelo island tells the story of how the island, now populated by the descendants of slaves, found itself locked in conflict with the state of Georgia as it struggles to preserve its rich African-American cultural heritage.

Sapelo Island

Author: Buddy Sullivan
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738505954
Format: PDF
Download Now
The barrier islands of the south Atlantic coastline have for years held a deep attraction for all who have come into contact with them. Few, however, can compare with the mystique of Sapelo Island, Georgia. This unique semitropical paradise evokes a time long forgotten, when antebellum cotton plantations dominated her landscape, all worked by hundreds of black slaves, the descendants of whom have lived in quiet solitude on the island for generations. For more than 50 years of the twentieth century, two millionaires held sway on Sapelo, and it is their story, interwoven with that of the island's residents, that unfolds within the pages of this book. Almost 200 photographs provide testimony to the dynamic forces and energies implanted upon Sapelo by two men, Howard E. Coffin, a Detroit automotive pioneer, and Richard J. Reynolds Jr., heir to a huge North Carolina tobacco fortune. Beginning with a photographic essay about Sapelo's antebellum plantation owner, Thomas Spalding, Sapelo Island moves into the primary focus of the story, the years from 1912 to 1964, an era of grandeur that has left a rich photographic legacy.

Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands

Author:
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820323893
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
A valuable collection of folk music and lore from the Gullah culture, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands preserves the rich traditions of slave descendants on the barrier islands of Georgia by interweaving their music with descriptions of their language, religious and social customs, and material culture. Collected over a period of nearly twenty-five years by Lydia Parrish, the sixty folk songs and attendant lore included in this book are evidence of antebellum traditions kept alive in the relatively isolated coastal regions of Georgia. Over the years, Parrish won the confidence of many of the African-American singers, not only collecting their songs but also discovering other elements of traditional culture that formed the context of those songs. When it was first published in 1942, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands contained much material that had not previously appeared in print. The songs are grouped in categories, including African survival songs; shout songs; ring-play, dance, and fiddle songs; and religious and work songs. In additions to the lyrics and melodies, Slave Songs includes Lydia Parrish's explanatory notes, character sketches of her informants, anecdotes, and a striking portfolio of photographs. Reproduced in its original oversized format, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands will inform and delight students and scholars of African-American culture and folklore as well as folk music enthusiasts.

Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater

Author: Buddy Sullivan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781483593593
Format: PDF
Download Now
Author Buddy Sullivan's "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater: A New Revised Edition" represents a complete recasting of a book issued under the same title in 1990, and reprinted five times. Sullivan is a prominent coastal Georgia historian and lecturer with nineteen titles to his credit. This new edition of "Early Days" incorporates all the material in the original version, in addition to considerable new information based on the author’s recent research. Additionally, the new "Early Days" has been reformatted to reflect improved chapter sequence and content to provide a smoother, more continuous narrative flow than that of the original edition. In essence, the revised edition is a completely new book that will be of improved utility to researchers, students, and the general reader. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is a comprehensive history of Sapelo Island, Darien and McIntosh County, Georgia, as well as a general overview of the history of coastal Georgia, focusing on Glynn, Liberty and Bryan counties, Savannah, and St. Simons and St. Catherines islands. It covers the full scope of coastal history: Guale Indians, Spanish missionaries, and early settlement by English colonists; the rice and cotton economy during the plantation era built upon the labors of enslaved peop≤ Civil War events, including the controversial burning of Darien; the timber industry, and the associated shipping activity that made Darien a leading center for the export of pine lumber for forty years; the emerging commercial oyster and shrimping fisheries; and the impact of millionaires, scientists and resident African Americans on the 20th century history of the region, especially Sapelo Island. Significantly, the new edition of "Early Days" relates the story of the area’s African American communities, particularly the developing Geechee settlements at Sapelo, Harris Neck and Darien in the years from the end of the Civil War through the 20th century. The author’s thematic approach is that of establishing the important connection between the ecology of the area with its history. This recurring theme will be apparent throughout the book in an analysis of just how people utilized the environmental circumstances unique to their region and adapted them to virtually every aspect of their lives and livelihood for 300 years. "Early Days" is thus essentially a story of land use and landscape: soils, tides, salt marshes, river hydrology, weather, and how these conditions impacted the agricultural, commercial and social development of the region. Of equal significance is the use people have made of the tidal waterways and fresh-water river systems, giving the new edition a distinctly maritime flavor. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is documented through source notes and an expanded index, and includes photographs of places and people, and localized maps that provide the geographical context necessary for an understanding of the economic, maritime and cultural dynamics of the coast.

Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Georgia

Author: Linda G. Chafin
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780977962105
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Abundantly illustrated with more than 400 color photographs and 200 detailed drawings, this comprehensive guide to the state's rare and endangered plants provides photographs and botanical illustrations in a single volume formatted for field use. More than 200 species are covered, including two dozen that are federally listed and 170-plus that are listed as Threatened, Endangered, Rare, or of Special Concern by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The guide is designed for easy, nontechnical identification of species in the field. Color photographs show the plants in their natural surroundings, and drawings emphasize the most distinctive parts of the plants. Packed with information about the plants as well as their habitats and management, the guide facilitates the quick recognition of rare species, encourages awareness of their distribution and ecological significance, and provides guidelines for ensuring their survival. Additional features include directions for using the guide, a map of Georgia's counties, descriptions of the natural communities of Georgia, references for further reading, a glossary of frequently used terms, and indexes of scientific and common plant names. The guide also includes a chapter by Jennifer Ceska and University of Georgia horticulture professor James Affolter, founding members of the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance, on horticultural requirements of rare species and the role of GPCA in their protection. This is a valuable resource for students, wildflower enthusiasts, botanists, land managers, and environmental decision makers. Each species account includes: one or more full-color photographs Georgia distribution map line drawing emphasizing such key field identification characters as leaf, stem, flower, and fruit scientific and common names legal and wetland status brief nontechnical description emphasizing key field identification characters flowering, fruiting, or sporulation period description of species habitat information on best survey season range-wide distribution Georgia conservation status management guidelines information on similar species and related rare species list of references

Drums and Shadows

Author:
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820308517
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Set against the background of the antebellum slave trade, Drums and Shadows traces the persistence of African heritage in the culture of blacks living on the Georgia coast in the 1930s. In the later years of the depression, members of the Georgia Writers' Project visited and interviewed blacks, many of whose grandparents, smuggled into slavery as late as 1858, had passed on the customs and beliefs of their African past. Seeking evidence of African traditions, the project's workers questioned the blacks about conjure--the curses and potions responsible for turns of luck, illnesses, and even death--about dreams that often determine the course of daily life, and about spirits and other apparitions as real as walking, breathing people.