The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology

Author: Dan Hicks
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107495172
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology provides an overview of the international field of historical archaeology (c.AD 1500 to the present) through seventeen specially-commissioned essays from leading researchers in the field. The volume explores key themes in historical archaeology including documentary archaeology, the writing of historical archaeology, colonialism, capitalism, industrial archaeology, maritime archaeology, cultural resource management and urban archaeology. Three special sections explore the distinctive contributions of material culture studies, landscape archaeology and the archaeology of buildings and the household. Drawing on case studies from North America, Europe, Australasia, Africa and around the world, the volume captures the breadth and diversity of contemporary historical archaeology, considers archaeology's relationship with history, cultural anthropology and other periods of archaeological study, and provides clear introductions to alternative conceptions of the field. This book is essential reading for anyone studying or researching the material remains of the recent past.

North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631231844
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This volume offers a rich and informative introduction to North American archaeology for all those interested in the history and culture of North American natives. Organized around central topics and debates within the discipline. Illustrated with case studies based on the lives of real people, to emphasize human agency, cultural practice, the body, issues of inequality, and the politics of archaeological practice. Highlights current understandings of cultural and historical processes in North America and situates these understandings within a global perspective.

Skull Wars

Author: David H. Thomas
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780786724369
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The 1996 discovery, near Kennewick, Washington, of a 9,000-year-old Caucasoid skeleton brought more to the surface than bones. The explosive controversy and resulting lawsuit also raised a far more fundamental question: Who owns history? Many Indians see archeologists as desecrators of tribal rites and traditions; archeologists see their livelihoods and science threatened by the 1990 Federal reparation law, which gives tribes control over remains in their traditional territories.In this new work, Thomas charts the riveting story of this lawsuit, the archeologists' deteriorating relations with American Indians, and the rise of scientific archeology. His telling of the tale gains extra credence from his own reputation as a leader in building cooperation between the two sides.

Unearthing Gotham

Author: Anne-Marie E. Cantwell
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300097993
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book looks at New York from a new perspective, an archaeological one. Describing the exciting discoveries of long lost worlds found beneath the modern metropolis, the authors present a narrative of the many peoples who shared and shaped the land that is now New York City, including nineteenth-century families, Dutch and English colonists, enslaved Africans, and the Native Americans who arrived eleven thousand years ago.

Children of the Past

Author: Lois Miner Huey
Publisher: Millbrook Press
ISBN: 1512438782
Format: PDF, Docs
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Do you have much in common with kids from long ago? Sure, their clothes and homes looked different. They ate different food and might not have ever gone to school. But they also made art—just like you. They helped their families with chores—just like you. They played with friends and siblings, and they explored the world around them. Archaeologists know about the lives of children from the past because of what they left behind: toys, tools, clothes, and more. So get ready to travel back in time and check out the lives of kids—from European cave kids twenty thousand years ago to American Indian kids one thousand years ago.

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art

Author: Paul G. Bahn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521454735
Format: PDF, Docs
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Surveys prehistoric art throughout the world, including body art, art on rocks and walls, and objects; changes in scholarship; and what the art can reveal about early sexual, social, economic, and religious life

The Oxford Handbook of North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy Pauketat
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190241098
Format: PDF
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This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.

First Peoples in a New World

Author: David J. Meltzer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520943155
Format: PDF, Mobi
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More than 12,000 years ago, in one of the greatest triumphs of prehistory, humans colonized North America, a continent that was then truly a new world. Just when and how they did so has been one of the most perplexing and controversial questions in archaeology. This dazzling, cutting-edge synthesis, written for a wide audience by an archaeologist who has long been at the center of these debates, tells the scientific story of the first Americans: where they came from, when they arrived, and how they met the challenges of moving across the vast, unknown landscapes of Ice Age North America. David J. Meltzer pulls together the latest ideas from archaeology, geology, linguistics, skeletal biology, genetics, and other fields to trace the breakthroughs that have revolutionized our understanding in recent years. Among many other topics, he explores disputes over the hemisphere's oldest and most controversial sites and considers how the first Americans coped with changing global climates. He also confronts some radical claims: that the Americas were colonized from Europe or that a crashing comet obliterated the Pleistocene megafauna. Full of entertaining descriptions of on-site encounters, personalities, and controversies, this is a compelling behind-the-scenes account of how science is illuminating our past.