Serfdom and Social Control in Russia

Author: Steven L. Hoch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226345857
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
This book includes an excellent analysis of the material and demographic foundations of patriarchal society, which will force historians to reevaluate the profitability of the estate economy and the standard of living among Russian serfs....This is an important book which should be read by anyone interested in peasant studies and servile systems of production.

Serfdom and Social Control in Russia

Author: Stephen L. Hoch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226345833
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
This book includes an excellent analysis of the material and demographic foundations of patriarchal society, which will force historians to reevaluate the profitability of the estate economy and the standard of living among Russian serfs....This is an important book which should be read by anyone interested in peasant studies and servile systems of production.

Cartographies of Tsardom

Author: Valerie Ann Kivelson
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801472534
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
By studying 17th century maps Kivelson sheds light on Muscovite Russia - the relationship of state and society, the growth of an empire, the rise of serfdom and the place of Orthodox Christianity in society.

Four Russian Serf Narratives

Author: John MacKay
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299233730
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Although millions of Russians lived as serfs until the middle of the nineteenth century, little is known about their lives. Identifying and documenting the conditions of Russian serfs has proven difficult because the Russian state discouraged literacy among the serfs and censored public expressions of dissent. To date scholars have identified only twenty known Russian serf narratives. Four Russian Serf Narratives contains four of these accounts and is the first translated collection of autobiographies by serfs. Scholar and translator John MacKay brings to light for an English-language audience a diverse sampling of Russian serf narratives, ranging from an autobiographical poem to stories of adventure and escape. “Autobiography” (1785) recounts a highly educated serf’s attempt to escape to Europe, where he hoped to study architecture. The long testimonial poem “News About Russia” (ca. 1849) laments the conditions under which the author and his fellow serfs lived. In “The Story of My Life and Wanderings” (1881) a serf tradesman tells of his attempt to simultaneously escape serfdom and captivity from Chechen mountaineers. The fragmentary “Notes of a Serf Woman” (1911) testifies to the harshness of peasant life with extraordinary acuity and descriptive power. These accounts offer readers a glimpse, from the point of view of the serfs themselves, into the realities of one of the largest systems of unfree labor in history. The volume also allows comparison with slave narratives produced in the United States and elsewhere, adding an important dimension to knowledge of the institution of slavery and the experience of enslavement in modern times.

Russia s age of serfdom 1649 1861

Author: Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405134576
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
"Russia's Age of Serfdom 1649-1861" offers a broad interpretive history of the Russian Empire from the time of serfdom's codification until its abolition following the Crimean War. Coverage focuses on those of the empire's European territories populated predominantly by ethnic Russian peasants. The book is divided into three chronological periods, each containing chapters on society, politics, and culture. The chapters on society consider the institution of serfdom, official social categories, and Russia's development as a country of peasants ruled by nobles, military commanders, and civil servants. Political chapters illuminate the reality of absolute monarchy in Russia, with special emphasis on the mobilization of human and material resources, the search for regular government, and the persistence of personal-moral forms of authority. Finally, the cultural chapters trace the emergence of modern Russian culture out of and alongside Orthodox religious culture, a process embodied in the Europeanization and growing independence of Russian elite society and in the emergence of political and cultural dissent.

The Road to Serfdom

Author: Friedrich August Hayek
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415253895
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Hayek argues convincingly that, while socialist ideals may be tempting, they cannot be accomplished except by means that few would approve of.

A Life Under Russian Serfdom

Author: Savva Dmitrievich Purlevskii
Publisher: Central European University Press
ISBN: 9789637326158
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
"Gorshkov's introduction provides some basic knowledge about Russian serfdom and draws upon the most recent scholarship. Notes provide references and general information about events, places and people mentioned in the memoirs."--Jacket.

Essays in Russian Social and Economic History

Author: Steven L. Hoch
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781618114280
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In this wide-ranging collection from Professor Steven L. Hoch of Washington State University, various facets of the life of Russia’s rural population are examined, from banking crises and infectious diseases to peasant rituals and land reform. In contrast to longstanding interpretations of the Russian peasantry, Hoch’s work emphasizes the role of social, epidemiological, and ecological forces in the formation of rural Russian society. Using sources infrequently considered by previous scholars, he assesses the impact of the broad economy on shaping the government polices of emancipation and land reform and the long-term consequences of these policies on peasant material well-being.

A Woman s Kingdom

Author: Michelle Lamarche Marrese
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801439117
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
In A Woman's Kingdom, Michelle Lamarche Marrese explores the development of Russian noblewomen's unusual property rights. In contrast to women in Western Europe, who could not control their assets during marriage until the second half of the nineteenth century, married women in Russia enjoyed the right to alienate and manage their fortunes beginning in 1753. Marrese traces the extension of noblewomen's right to property and places this story in the broader context of the evolution of private property in Russia before the Great Reforms of the 1860s. Historians have often dismissed women's property rights as meaningless. In the patriarchal society of Imperial Russia, a married woman could neither work nor travel without her husband's permission, and divorce was all but unattainable. Yet, through a detailed analysis of women's property rights from the Petrine era through the abolition of serfdom in 1861, Marrese demonstrates the significance of noblewomen's proprietary power. She concludes that Russian noblewomen were unique not only for the range of property rights available to them, but also for the active exercise of their legal prerogatives.A remarkably broad source base provides a solid foundation for Marrese's conclusions. These sources comprise more than eight thousand transactions from notarial records documenting a variety of property transfers, property disputes brought to the Senate, noble family papers, and a vast memoir literature. A Woman's Kingdom stands as a masterful challenge to the existing, androcentric view of noble society in Russia before Emancipation.

Bondage

Author: Alessandro Stanziani
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782382518
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
For the first time, this book provides the global history of labor in Central Eurasia, Russia, Europe, and the Indian Ocean between the sixteenth and the twentieth centuries. It contests common views on free and unfree labor, and compares the latter to many Western countries where wage conditions resembled those of domestic servants. This gave rise to extreme forms of dependency in the colonies, not only under slavery, but also afterwards in form of indentured labor in the Indian Ocean and obligatory labor in Africa. Stanziani shows that unfree labor and forms of economic coercion were perfectly compatible with market development and capitalism, proven by the consistent economic growth that took place all over Eurasia between the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries. This growth was labor intensive: commercial expansion, transformations in agriculture, and the first industrial revolution required more labor, not less. Finally, Stanziani demonstrates that this world did not collapse after the French Revolution or the British industrial revolution, as is commonly assumed, but instead between 1870 and 1914, with the second industrial revolution and the rise of the welfare state.