Sex Drugs and Rock n Roll

Author: Robert C. Cottrell
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442246073
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As the first full-bodied treatment of the American counterculture of the 1960s, Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll traces its origins, discusses its most important figures, delves into iconic works, relates its ebb and flow, dissects the intersection of culture and politics, highlights millennial and apocalyptic sensibilities, and traces legacies.

Sex Drugs and Rock n Roll

Author: Robert C. Cottrell
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 9781442246065
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
As the first full-bodied treatment of the American counterculture of the 1960s,Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll traces its origins, discusses its most important figures, delves into iconic works, relates its ebb and flow, dissects the intersection of culture and politics, highlights millennial and apocalyptic sensibilities, and traces legacies.

The 00individual Counter Culture Compendium 1960 s and 1970 s Sex Drugs and Rock n Roll Volume 1 The 1960s

Author: 00individual
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780997915914
Format: PDF
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The Compendium's use of classic and historic music and rock concert reviews serve as time stamps and reflections of the '60's era. Consciousness was raised, cultures and generations clashed, creativity was ubiquitous, the Vietnam War was protested, love was free, and Rock 'n' Roll Ruled! Archived by an L.A. eyewitness who lived the era.

Hippies A Guide to an American Subculture

Author: Micah Lee Issitt
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313365733
Format: PDF, Docs
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An insightful introduction to hippie culture and how its revolutionary principles in the 1960s helped shape modern culture. • Includes 13 primary sources, including excerpts from articles, speeches, and original interviews, and Abbie Hoffman's trial interview • Presents original photography by acclaimed photographer Robert Altman, providing views of hippies at the height of 1960s culture

Droppers

Author: Mark Matthews
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 080618308X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll. In popular imagination, these words seem to capture the atmosphere of 1960s hippie communes. Yet when the first hippie commune was founded in 1965 outside Trinidad, Colorado, the goal wasn’t one long party but rather a new society that integrated life and art. In Droppers, Mark Matthews chronicles the rise and fall of this utopian community, exploring the goals behind its creation and the factors that eventually led to its dissolution. Seeking refuge from enforced social conformity, the turmoil of racial conflict, and the Vietnam War, artist Eugene Bernofsky and other founders of Drop City sought to create an environment that would promote both equality and personal autonomy. These high ideals became increasingly hard to sustain, however, in the face of external pressures and internal divisions. In a rollicking, fast-paced style, Matthews vividly describes the early enthusiasm of Drop City’s founders, as Bernofsky and his friends constructed a town in the desert literally using the “detritus of society.” Over time, Drop City suffered from media attention, the distraction of visitors, and the arrival of new residents who didn’t share the founders’ ideals. Matthews bases his account on numerous interviews with Bernofsky and other residents as well as written sources. Explaining Drop City in the context of the counterculture’s evolution and the American tradition of utopian communities, he paints an unforgettable picture of a largely misunderstood phenomenon in American history.

Power to the People

Author: Geoff Kaplan
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226424375
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Though we think of the 1960s and the early ‘70s as a time of radical social, cultural, and political upheaval, we tend to picture the action as happening on campuses and in the streets. Yet the rise of the underground newspaper was equally daring and original. Thanks to advances in cheap offset printing, groups involved in antiwar, civil rights, and other social liberation issues began to spread their messages through provocatively designed newspapers and broadsheets. This vibrant new media was essential to the counterculture revolution as a whole—helping to motivate the masses and proliferate ideas. Power to the People presents more than 700 full-color images and excerpts from these astonishing publications, many of which have not been seen since they were first published almost fifty years ago. From the psychedelic pages of the Oracle, Haight-Ashbury’s paper of choice, to the fiery editorials of the Black Panther Party Paper, these papers were remarkable for their editors’ fervent belief in freedom of expression and their DIY philosophy. They were also extraordinary for their graphic innovations. Experimental typography and wildly inventive layouts reflect an alternative media culture as much informed by the space age, television, and socialism as it was by the great trinity of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll. Assembled by renowned graphic designer Geoff Kaplan, Power to the People pays homage in its layout to the radical press. Beyond its unparalleled images, Power to the People includes essays by Gwen Allen, Bob Ostertag, and Fred Turner, as well as a series of recollections edited by Pamela M. Lee, all of which comment on the critical impact of the alternative press in the social and popular movements of those turbulent years. Power to the People treats the design practices of that moment as activism in its own right that offers a vehement challenge to the dominance of official media and a critical form of self-representation. No other book surveys in such variety the highly innovative graphic design of the underground press, and certainly no other book captures the era with such an unmatched eye toward its aesthetic and look. Power to the People is not just a major compendium of art from the ’60s and ’70s—it showcases how the radical media graphically fashioned the image of a countercultural revolution that still resounds to this day.

God s Forever Family

Author: Larry Eskridge
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195326458
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Jesus People were an unlikely combination of evangelical Christianity and the hippie counterculture. God's Forever Family is the first major examination of this phenomenon in over thirty years.

The Republic of Rock

Author: Michael J. Kramer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199987351
Format: PDF, ePub
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In his 1967 megahit "San Francisco," Scott McKenzie sang of "people in motion" coming from all across the country to San Francisco, the white-hot center of rock music and anti-war protests. At the same time, another large group of young Americans was also in motion, less eagerly, heading for the jungles of Vietnam. Now, in The Republic of Rock, Michael Kramer draws on new archival sources and interviews to explore sixties music and politics through the lens of these two generation-changing places--San Francisco and Vietnam. From the Acid Tests of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters to hippie disc jockeys on strike, the military's use of rock music to "boost morale" in Vietnam, and the forgotten tale of a South Vietnamese rock band, The Republic of Rock shows how the musical connections between the City of the Summer of Love and war-torn Southeast Asia were crucial to the making of the sixties counterculture. The book also illustrates how and why the legacy of rock music in the sixties continues to matter to the meaning of citizenship in a global society today. Going beyond clichéd narratives about sixties music, Kramer argues that rock became a way for participants in the counterculture to think about what it meant to be an American citizen, a world citizen, a citizen-consumer, or a citizen-soldier. The music became a resource for grappling with the nature of democracy in larger systems of American power both domestically and globally. For anyone interested in the 1960s, popular music, and American culture and counterculture, The Republic of Rock offers new insight into the many ways rock music has shaped our ideas of individual freedom and collective belonging.

The Hippies

Author: John Anthony Moretta
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786499494
Format: PDF
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"In this extremely treatise on the vast reaches and deep roots of a defining movement, Moretta offers a probing and potent work of cultural anthropology that captures the essence of the youthful energy that changed a nation and influenced the world"--Booklist. Among the most significant subcultures in modern U.S. history, the hippies had a far-reaching impact. Their influence essentially defined the 1960s--hippie antifashion, divergent music, dropout politics and "make love not war" philosophy extended to virtually every corner of the world and remain influential. The political and cultural institutions that the hippies challenged, or abandoned, mainly prevailed. Yet the nonviolent, egalitarian hippie principles led an era of civic protest that brought an end to the Vietnam War. Their enduring impact was the creation of a 1960s frame of reference among millions of baby boomers, whose attitudes and aspirations continue to reflect the hip ethos of their youth.