Sifters

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198030034
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this edited volume, Theda Perdue, a nationally known expert on Indian history and southern women's history, offers a rich collection of biographical essays on Native American women. From Pocahontas, a Powhatan woman of the seventeenth century, to Ada Deer, the Menominee woman who headed the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the 1990s, the essays span four centuries. Each one recounts the experiences of women from vastly different cultural traditions--the hunting and gathering of Kumeyaay culture of Delfina Cuero, the pueblo society of San Ildefonso potter Maria Martinez, and the powerful matrilineal kinship system of Molly Brant's Mohawks. Contributors focus on the ways in which different women have fashioned lives that remain firmly rooted in their identity as Native women. Perdue's introductory essay ties together the themes running through the biographical sketches, including the cultural factors that have shaped the lives of Native women, particularly economic contributions, kinship, and belief, and the ways in which historical events, especially in United States Indian policy, have engendered change.

Native Women s History in Eastern North America Before 1900

Author: Rebecca Kugel
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803227795
Format: PDF, Docs
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How can we learn more about Native women?s lives in North America in earlier centuries? This question is answered by this landmark anthology, an essential guide to the significance, experiences, and histories of Native women. Sixteen classic essays?plus new commentary?many by the original authors?describe a broad range of research methods and sources offering insight into the lives of Native American women. The authors explain the use of letters and diaries, memoirs and autobiographies, newspaper accounts and ethnographies, census data and legal documents. This collection offers guidelines for extracting valuable information from such diverse sources and assessing the significance of such variables as religious affiliation, changes in women?s power after colonization, connections between economics and gender, and representations (and misrepresentations) of Native women. ø Indispensable to anyone interested in exploring the role of gender in Native American history or in emphasizing Native women?s experiences within the context of women?s history, this anthology helps restore the historical reality of Native women and is essential to an understanding of North American history.

North American Indians A Very Short Introduction

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199746101
Format: PDF, Docs
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When Europeans first arrived in North America, between five and eight million indigenous people were already living there. But how did they come to be here? What were their agricultural, spiritual, and hunting practices? How did their societies evolve and what challenges do they face today? Eminent historians Theda Perdue and Michael Green begin by describing how nomadic bands of hunter-gatherers followed the bison and woolly mammoth over the Bering land mass between Asia and what is now Alaska between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago, settling throughout North America. They describe hunting practices among different tribes, how some made the gradual transition to more settled, agricultural ways of life, the role of kinship and cooperation in Native societies, their varied burial rites and spiritual practices, and many other features of Native American life. Throughout the book, Perdue and Green stress the great diversity of indigenous peoples in America, who spoke more than 400 different languages before the arrival of Europeans and whose ways of life varied according to the environments they settled in and adapted to so successfully. Most importantly, the authors stress how Native Americans have struggled to maintain their sovereignty--first with European powers and then with the United States--in order to retain their lands, govern themselves, support their people, and pursue practices that have made their lives meaningful. Going beyond the stereotypes that so often distort our views of Native Americans, this Very Short Introduction offers a historically accurate, deeply engaging, and often inspiring account of the wide array of Native peoples in America. About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life's most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.

Walking in Two Worlds

Author: Nancy M. Peterson
Publisher: Caxton Press
ISBN: 0870044508
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"[The author] tells the stories of twelve mixed-blood women who, steeped in the tradition of their Indian mothers but forced into the world of their white fathers, fought to find their identities in a rapidly changing world. In an era when most white women had limited opportunities outside the home, these mix-blood women often became nationally recognized leaders in the fight for Native American rights. They took the tools and training the whites provided and used them to help their people. They found differing paths--medicine, music, crafts, the classroom, the lecture hall, the stage, the written word--and walked strong and tall. These women did far more than survive; they extended a hand to help their people find a place in a hard new future."--Back cover.

Women s Rights People and Perspectives

Author: Crista DeLuzio
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598841157
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A lively, accessible collection of essays exploring the history of the struggle for women's rights in the United States from the colonial period to the present. • Primary sources, including the 1692 witchcraft examination of Bridget Bishop; an excerpt from a 1917 National American Woman Suffrage Organization document, "Why Women Should Vote; " and excerpts from "School Days of an Indian Girl by Zitkala-Sa" • Each chapter contains sidebars for more in-depth coverage and an annotated bibliograpy offers information on scholarly works for further research

A to Z of American Indian Women

Author: Liz Sonneborn
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438107889
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Presents a biographical dictionary profiling important Native American women, including birth and death dates, major accomplishments, and historical influence.

As Long as the Rivers Flow

Author: Paula Gunn Allen
Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
ISBN: 9780590478700
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discusses the lives and successes of nine individuals of Native American backgrounds, including Geronimo, Will Rogers, Maria Tallchief, and Wilma Mankiller. Reprint.

Writing Indian Nations

Author: Maureen Konkle
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807875902
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.

America History and Life

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.