Social identity and Russian cultural politics

Author: Allison Yenkin Katsev
Publisher:
ISBN:
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"This dissertation investigates the evolution of categories of social identity in the first half of the nineteenth century by exploring the changing ways that three consecutive rivals for the Russian history chair at Moscow University -- M.T. Kachenovskii (1775-1842), M.P. Pogodin (1800-1875) and S.M. Solovʹev (1820-1879) -- defined themselves and each other."--P. iv.

Translation in Russian Contexts

Author: Brian James Baer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131530533X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume represents the first large-scale effort to address topics of translation in Russian contexts across the disciplinary boundaries of Slavic Studies and Translation Studies, thus opening up new perspectives for both fields. Leading scholars from Eastern and Western Europe offer a comprehensive overview of Russian translation history examining a variety of domains, including literature, philosophy and religion. Divided into three parts, this book highlights Russian contributions to translation theory and demonstrates how theoretical perspectives developed within the field help conceptualize relevant problems in cultural context in pre-Soviet, Soviet, and post-Soviet Russia. This transdisciplinary volume is a valuable addition to an under-researched area of translation studies and will appeal to a broad audience of scholars and students across the fields of Translation Studies, Slavic Studies, and Russian and Soviet history.

Social Identity in Imperial Russia

Author: Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780875802312
Format: PDF, ePub
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How did enlightened Russians of the eighteenth century understand society? And how did they reconcile their professed ideals of equality and justice with the authoritarian political structures in which they lived? Historian Elise Wirtschafter turns to literary plays to reconstruct the social thinking of the past and to discover how Enlightenment Russians understood themselves. Opening with an illuminating discussion of the development of theater in eighteenth-century Russia, Wirtschafter goes on to explore dramatic representations of key social questions. Based on an examination of nearly 300 secular plays written during the last half of the century, she shows how dramas for the stage represented and debated important public issues--such as the nature of the common good, the structure of the patriarchal household, the duty of monarchs, and the role of the individual in society. Wirtschafter presents a striking reconstruction of the way educated Russians conceptualized a society beyond the immediate spheres of household and locality. Seeking to highlight problems of "social consciousness," she asks what Enlightenment Russians thought about social experience--and how their ideas related to actual social relationships in a society organized around serfdom and absolute monarchy. She portrays Russian Enlightenment culture on its own terms, while at the same time shedding light on broader problems of social order and political authority in imperial Russia.

Russia s Regional Identities

Author: Edith W. Clowes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315513315
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Contemporary Russia is often viewed as a centralised regime based in Moscow, with dependent provinces, made subservient by Putin’s policies limiting regional autonomy. This book, however, demonstrates that beyond this largely political view, by looking at Russia’s regions more in cultural and social terms, a quite different picture emerges, of a Russia rich in variety, with different regional identities, cultures, traditions and memories. The book explores how identities are formed and rethought in contemporary Russia, and outlines the nature of particular regional identities, from Siberia and the Urals to southern Russia, from the Russian heartland to the non-Russian republics.

Identity in Formation

Author: David D. Laitin
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801484957
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Laitin portrays these Russian-speakers as a "beached diaspora" since the populations did not cross international borders; the borders themselves receded. He asks what will become of these populations. Will they learn the languages of the republics in which they live and prepare their children for assimilation? Will they return to a homeland many have never seen? Or will they become loyal citizens of the new republics while maintaining a Russian identity?

Soviet and Post Soviet Identities

Author: Mark Bassin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107011175
Format: PDF, Docs
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A fresh look at post-Soviet Russia and Eurasia and at the Soviet historical background that shaped the present.

National Identity and Globalization

Author: Douglas W. Blum
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139466720
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Is globalization in danger of diluting national identities and 'transnationalizing' cultures? How can societies attempt to manage globalization and become developed while maintaining a viable national identity? In this 2007 study of three globalizing states and cities in post-Soviet Eurasia - Russia (Astrakhan), Kazakhstan (Almaty), and Azerbaijan (Baku) - Douglas W. Blum provides an empirical examination of national identity formation, exploring how cultures, particularly youth cultures, have been affected by global forces. Blum argues that social discourse regarding youth cultural trends - coupled with official and non-official approaches to youth policy - complement patterns of state-society relations and modes of response to globalization. His findings show that the nations studied have embraced certain aspects of modernity and liberalism, while rejecting others, but have also reasserted the place of national traditions.

Political culture and national identity in Russian Ukrainian relations

Author: Mikhail A. Molchanov
Publisher: TAMU Press
ISBN:
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In this provocative study, Mikhail A. Molchanov analyzes the political and cultural factors that underlie modern national identities in Russia and Ukraine and systematically compares the political cultures of these two historically similar, yet profoundly different nations.The author argues that domestic and international factors shape national identities, which are not an inherent characteristic of a people, but arise in interaction with the national "other." The "self-other" relationship is therefore a key element of national identity, particularly in newly independent states, of which Ukraine is a prime example.Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, national identities had to be reconstructed or re-created. Molchanov questions the extent to which Russians have been able to construct an identity apart from that of the Soviet Union, arguing that the system denationalized them in an attempt to create the ideal "Soviet Man."Molchanov sees Ukraine neither as Russia's victim, nor as itsopposite. Unlike those who fear a resurgent Russia and who argue that it should be contained by local nationalisms in the "near abroad, " Molchanov believes this strategy can lead only to estrangement between Russia and its neighbors. In addition, Russia's recent opening and demonstrated support of the United States is too valuable to the world to be sacrificed to a new variant of the containment strategy.

Consumer Culture Branding and Identity in the New Russia

Author: Graham H.J. Roberts
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317936329
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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As shopping has been transformed from a chore into a major source of hedonistic pleasure, a specifically Russian consumer culture has begun to emerge that is unlike any other. This book examines the many different facets of consumption in today’s Russia, including retailing, advertising and social networking. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the inherently visual - not to say spectacular - nature both of consumption generally, and of Russian consumer culture in particular. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which brands, both Russian and foreign, construct categories of identity in order to claim legitimacy for themselves. What emerges is a fascinating picture of how consumer culture is being reinvented in Russia today, in a society which has one, nostalgic eye turned towards the past, and the other, utopian eye, set firmly on the future. Borrowing concepts from both marketing and cultural studies, the approach throughout is interdisciplinary, and will be of considerable interest, to researchers, students and practitioners wishing to gain invaluable insights into one of the most lucrative, and exciting, of today’s emerging markets.