Social identity and Russian cultural politics

Author: Allison Yenkin Katsev
Publisher:
ISBN:
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"This dissertation investigates the evolution of categories of social identity in the first half of the nineteenth century by exploring the changing ways that three consecutive rivals for the Russian history chair at Moscow University -- M.T. Kachenovskii (1775-1842), M.P. Pogodin (1800-1875) and S.M. Solovʹev (1820-1879) -- defined themselves and each other."--P. iv.

National Identity in Russian Culture

Author: Simon Franklin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521024297
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What is Russia? Who are Russians? What is 'Russianness'? The question of national identity has long been a vexed one in Russia, and is particularly pertinent in the post-Soviet period. For a thousand years these questions have been central to the work of Russian writers, artists, musicians, film-makers, critics, politicians and philosophers. Questions of national self-identity permeate Russian cultural self-expression. This wide-ranging study, designed for students of Russian literature, culture, and history, explores aspects of national identity in Russian culture from medieval times to the present day. Written by an international team of scholars, the volume offers an accessible overview and a broad, multi-faceted introductory account of this central feature of Russian cultural history. The book is comprehensive and concise; it combines general surveys with a wide range of specific examples to convey the rich texture of Russian cultural expression over the past thousand years.

Social Identity in Imperial Russia

Author: Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780875802312
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How did enlightened Russians of the eighteenth century understand society? And how did they reconcile their professed ideals of equality and justice with the authoritarian political structures in which they lived? Historian Elise Wirtschafter turns to literary plays to reconstruct the social thinking of the past and to discover how Enlightenment Russians understood themselves. Opening with an illuminating discussion of the development of theater in eighteenth-century Russia, Wirtschafter goes on to explore dramatic representations of key social questions. Based on an examination of nearly 300 secular plays written during the last half of the century, she shows how dramas for the stage represented and debated important public issues--such as the nature of the common good, the structure of the patriarchal household, the duty of monarchs, and the role of the individual in society. Wirtschafter presents a striking reconstruction of the way educated Russians conceptualized a society beyond the immediate spheres of household and locality. Seeking to highlight problems of "social consciousness," she asks what Enlightenment Russians thought about social experience--and how their ideas related to actual social relationships in a society organized around serfdom and absolute monarchy. She portrays Russian Enlightenment culture on its own terms, while at the same time shedding light on broader problems of social order and political authority in imperial Russia.

Gender Generation and Identity in Contemporary Russia

Author: Hilary Pilkington
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415135443
Format: PDF
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This book explores the lives and expectations of young women in the new Russia, looking at the enormous changes that the new social and economic environment have brought. The authors draw on the growing literature on gender and generation in the West which has arisen as a result of the recognition that the experience of youth is classed, raced and gendered and that the experience of gender is mediated by class, race, ethnicity, sexuality and age. They consider the role of the media, state and social institutions in shaping opportunities and experiences in the post-Soviet environment, focusing on the strategies employed by individual women to reforge social identities in a society in which they have been dislocated more acutely than in any other `postmodern' society.

Russische Geschichte 1547 1917

Author: Christoph Schmidt
Publisher: Oldenbourg Verlag
ISBN: 348670091X
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Mit Christoph Schmidts Band gibt es eine kompakte Einführung in die Geschichte des Zarenreichs. Gut zu lesen führt die Darstellung durch annähernd vier Jahrhunderte russischer Geschichte. Im Mittelpunkt des Forschungsteils stehen vier grundlegende Aspekte: Geografie, Ethnologie, Orthodoxie und Autokratie. Ein idealer Leitfaden durch den aktuellen Stand der Forschung ist das thematisch gegliederte Quellen- und Literaturverzeichnis. Aus der Presse "... Schmidts Kompetenz zeigt sich vor allem dort, wo er sich auf seine eigenen Forschungen über Staat und Gesellschaft im Russland der Frühen Neuzeit berufen kann. Wer eine knappe, gleichwohl erschöpfende Zusammenfassung der historischen Literatur über Autokratie, Adel und Ständeverfassung im Russland des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts erwartet, wird nicht enttäuscht werden." Jörg Baberowski in: Geschichte und Wissenschaft und Unterricht (Heft 11, November 2007)

Russia s Regional Identities

Author: Edith W. Clowes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315513315
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Contemporary Russia is often viewed as a centralised regime based in Moscow, with dependent provinces, made subservient by Putin’s policies limiting regional autonomy. This book, however, demonstrates that beyond this largely political view, by looking at Russia’s regions more in cultural and social terms, a quite different picture emerges, of a Russia rich in variety, with different regional identities, cultures, traditions and memories. The book explores how identities are formed and rethought in contemporary Russia, and outlines the nature of particular regional identities, from Siberia and the Urals to southern Russia, from the Russian heartland to the non-Russian republics.

Culture Ethnicity and Migration After Communism

Author: Anton Popov
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317155807
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This book addresses the issue of emerging transnationalism in the conditions of post-socialism through focusing on migrants’ identity as a social construction resulting from their experience of the ‘transnational circuit of culture’ as well as from post-Soviet shifts in political and economic conditions in their home regions. Anton Popov draws upon ethnographic research conducted among Greek transnational migrants living on the Black Sea coast and in the North Caucasus regions of Russia who have become involved in extensive cross-border migration between the former Soviet Union (the Russian Federation, Kazakhstan and Georgia) and Greece (as well as Cyprus). It is estimated that more than 150,000 former Soviet citizens of Greek origin have resettled in Greece since the late 1980s. Yet, many of those who emigrate do not cut their connections with the home communities in Russia but instead establish their own transnational circuit of travel between Greece and Russia. This study demonstrates how migrants employ their ethnicity as symbolic capital available for investment in transnational migration. Simultaneously they rework their practices of family networking, property relations and political participation in a way which strengthens their attachment to the local territory. The findings presented in the book imply that the social identities, economic strategies, political practices and cultural representation of the Russia’s Pontic Greeks are all deeply embedded in the shifting social and cultural landscape of post-Soviet Russia and extensively influenced by the global movement of ideas, goods and people.

Between Tsar and People

Author: Edith W. Clowes
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691008516
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This interdisciplinary collection of essays on the social and cultural life of late imperial Russia describes the struggle of new elites to take up a "middle position" in society--between tsar and people. During this period autonomous social and cultural institutions, pluralistic political life, and a dynamic economy all seemed to be emerging: Russia was experiencing a sense of social possibility akin to that which Gorbachev wishes to reanimate in the Soviet Union. But then, as now, diversity had as its price the potential for political disorder and social dissolution. Analyzing the attempt of educated Russians to forge new identities, this book reveals the social, cultural, and regional fragmentation of the times. The contributors are Harley Balzer, John E. Bowlt, Joseph Bradley, William C. Brumfield, Edith W. Clowes, James M. Curtis, Ben Eklof, Gregory L. Freeze, Abbott Gleason, Samuel D. Kassow, Mary Louise Loe, Louise McReynolds, Sidney Monas, John O. Norman, Daniel T. Orlovsky, Thomas C. Owen, Alfred Rieber, Bernice G. Rosenthal, Christine Ruane, Charles E. Timberlake, William Wagner, and James L. West. Samuel D. Kassow has written a conclusion to the volume.