Speak it Louder

Author: Deborah Wong
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135878242
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Speak it Louder

Author: Deborah Anne Wong
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415970396
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Soundtracks of Asian America

Author: Grace Wang
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822376083
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
In Soundtracks of Asian America, Grace Wang explores how Asian Americans use music to construct narratives of self, race, class, and belonging in national and transnational spaces. She highlights how they navigate racialization in different genres by considering the experiences of Asians and Asian Americans in Western classical music, U.S. popular music, and Mandopop (Mandarin-language popular music). Her study encompasses the perceptions and motivations of middle-class Chinese and Korean immigrant parents intensely involved in their children's classical music training, and of Asian and Asian American classical musicians whose prominence in their chosen profession is celebrated by some and undermined by others. Wang interviews young Asian American singer-songwriters who use YouTube to contest the limitations of a racialized U.S. media landscape, and she investigates the transnational modes of belonging forged by Asian American pop stars pursuing recording contracts and fame in East Asia. Foregrounding musical spaces where Asian Americans are particularly visible, Wang examines how race matters and operates in the practices and institutions of music making.

California Polyphony

Author: Mina Yang
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025209297X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
What does it mean to be "Californian"? California Polyphony: Ethnic Voices, Musical Crossroads suggests an answer that lies at the intersection of musicology, cultural history, and politics. Consisting of a series of musical case studies of major ethnic groups in California, this book approaches the notion of Californian identity from diverse perspectives, each nuanced by class, gender, and sexuality. In the early twentieth century, the concept of the Pacific Rim and an orientalist fascination with Asian music and culture dominated the popular imagination of white Californians, influencing their interactions with the Asian Other. Several decades later, as tensions rose between the Los Angeles Police Department and the African American community, the once-thriving jazz and blues nightclub scene of 1940s Central Avenue became a primary target for law enforcement's anti-vice crusade. The reactionary nature of the musical scores for Hollywood's noir films of the World War II and postwar eras negotiated the perceived demise of white female sexuality in the face of black culture and urban corruption. Mina Yang also considers Mexican Americans' conflicted assimilation into the white American mainstream from the early 1900s through the 1970s, as well as contemporary Korean Americans' struggles to express their cultural and national identities through hip-hop, a genre usually associated with African Americans. According to Yang, there has never been a straightforward definition of "Californian." This most populous and most affluent state in the Union has been setting musical and cultural trends for decades, and Yang's study thoughtfully illuminates the multiculutral nature of its musics.

Yellow Power Yellow Soul

Author: Roger N. Buckley
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252094700
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This dynamic collection explores the life, work, and persona of saxophonist Fred Ho, an unabashedly revolutionary artist whose illuminating and daring work redefines the relationship between art and politics. Scholars, artists, and friends give their unique takes on Ho's career, articulating his artistic contributions, their joint projects, and personal stories. Exploring his musical and theatrical work, his political theory and activism, and his personal life as it relates to politics, Yellow Power, Yellow Soul offers an intimate appreciation of Fred Ho's irrepressible and truly original creative spirit. Contributors are Roger N. Buckley, Peggy Myo-Young Choy, Jayne Cortez, Kevin Fellezs, Diane C. Fujino, Magdalena Gómez, Richard Hamasaki, Esther Iverem, Robert Kocik, Genny Lim, Ruth Margraff, Bill V. Mullen, Tamara Roberts, Arthur J. Sabatini, Kalamu ya Salaam, Miyoshi Smith, Arthur Song, and Salim Washington.

Sounding the Center

Author: Deborah Wong
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226905853
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Sounding the Center is an in-depth look at the power behind classical music and dance in Bangkok, the capital and sacred center of Buddhist Thailand. Focusing on the ritual honoring teachers of music and dance, Deborah Wong reveals a complex network of connections among kings, teachers, knowledge, and performance that underlies the classical court arts. Drawing on her extensive fieldwork, Wong lays out the ritual in detail: the way it is enacted, the foods and objects involved, and the people who perform it, emphasizing the way the performers themselves discuss and construct aspects of the ceremony.

Echoes from Dharamsala

Author: Keila Diehl
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520230442
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
"Echoes of Dharamsala takes us deep into exile as a performance space, a refugee home on the diasporic range. The metaphor of reverberation comes very much to life as Keila Diehl bears witness to the emergent politics and poetics of Tibetan rock and roll. Compassionate and modest, yet incisive and unromantic, her writing brings us close to amazingly complicated musical lives being forged in a distinct global conjuncture of modernity, desire, and longing."—Steven Feld, Prof. of Music and Anthropology, Columbia University "Echoes from Dharamsala is a charmingly written, ethnographically rich, theoretically ambitious book about a Tibetan community in exile. Keila Diehl joined a Tibetan rock band as its keyboard player, and from that perspective gives us a fresh and honest look at the Tibetan refugee experience through its soundscapes. She has presented us with a model of ethnography, which while not shying away from representing the conflicts and contradictions of the community she studied, nevertheless displays a deep political solidarity with the Tibetan cause."—Akhil Gupta, author of Postcolonial Developments: Agriculture in the Making of Modern India "Giving new meaning to "participant-observation," Keila Diehl explores the politics and poetics of Tibetan cultural production in exile, in a study that is at once engaging and insightful."—Donald S. Lopez, author of Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West

Asian America

Author: Pawan Dhingra
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745682367
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority population in the country. Moreover, they provide a wonderful lens on the experiences of immigrants and minorities in the United States more generally, both historically and today. In this timely new text, Pawan Dhingra and Robyn Magalit Rodriguez critically examine key sociological topics through the experiences of Asian Americans, including social hierarchies (of race, gender, and sexuality), work, education, family, culture, identity, media, pan-ethnicity, social movements, and politics. With vivid examples and lucid discussion of a broad range of theories, the authors demonstrate the contributions of the discipline of sociology to understanding Asian Americans, and vice versa. In addition, this text takes students beyond the boundaries of the United States to cultivate a comparative and global understanding of the Asian experience, as it has become increasingly transnational and diasporic. Bridging sociology and the growing interdisciplinary field of Asian American studies, and uniquely placing them in dialogue with one another, this engaging text will be welcome in undergraduate and graduate sociology courses such as race and ethnic relations, immigration, and social stratification, as well as on ethnic studies courses more broadly.

Sensational Knowledge

Author: Tomie Hahn
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 9780819568359
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
DVD contains: Examples of performances.

Shadows in the Field

Author: Gregory F. Barz
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199886709
Format: PDF
Download Now
Ethnomusicological fieldwork has significantly changed since the end of the the 20th century. Ethnomusicology is in a critical moment that requires new perspecitves on fieldwork - perspectives that are not addressed in the standard guides to ethnomusicological or anthropological method. The focus in ethnomusicological writing and teaching has traditionally centered around analyses and ethnographic representations of musical cultures, rather than on the personal world of understanding, experience, knowing, and doing fieldwork. Shadows in the Field deliberately shifts the focus of ethnomusicology and of ethnography in general from representation (text) to experience (fieldwork). The "new fieldwork" moves beyond mere data collection and has become a defining characteristic of ethnomusicology that engages the scholar in meaningful human contexts. In this new edition of Shadows in the Field, renowned ethnomusicologists explore the roles they themselves act out while performing fieldwork and pose significant questions for the field: What are the new directions in ethnomusicological fieldwork? Where does fieldwork of "the past" fit into these theories? And above all, what do we see when we acknowledge the shadows we cast in the field? The second edition of Shadows in the Field includes updates of all existing chapters, a new preface by Bruno Nettl, and seven new chapters addressing critical issues and concerns that have become increasingly relevant since the first edition.