State Power and Community in Early Modern Russia

Author: B. Davies
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230000649
Format: PDF
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State, Power and Community in Early Modern Russia is a vivid reconstruction of life in one of the garrison towns built on Muscovy's southern steppe frontier in the early Seventeenth-century to defend against Tatar raids. It focuses on how the colonization process shaped power relations in a particular southern garrison community, both at the village level, within the land commune, and at the district level, between the general garrison community and the appointed officials representing state authority.

Religion and the Early Modern State

Author: James D. Tracy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521828253
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Thirteen 2005 essays show worldwide perspectives of how early modern governments attempted to regulate religious life.

Warfare in Eastern Europe 1500 1800

Author: Brian Davies
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004221964
Format: PDF, Docs
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A comparative examination of military development in early modern Eastern Europe, focusing on Russian, Polish-Lithuanian, Ottoman, Habsburg, Cossack, and Western European mercenary practice.

Warfare State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe 1500 1700

Author: Brian Davies
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134552831
Format: PDF
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This crucial period in Russia's history has, up until now, been neglected by historians, but here Brian L. Davies' study provides an essential insight into the emergence of Russia as a great power. For nearly three centuries, Russia vied with the Crimean Khanate, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire for mastery of the Ukraine and the fertile steppes above the Black Sea, a region of great strategic and economic importance – arguably the pivot of Eurasia at the time. The long campaign took a great toll upon Russia's population, economy and institutions, and repeatedly frustrated or redefined Russian military and diplomatic projects in the West. The struggle was every bit as important as Russia's wars in northern and central Europe for driving the Russian state-building process, forcing military reform and shaping Russia's visions of Empire.

A Bride for the Tsar

Author: Russell Martin
Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press
ISBN: 9780875804484
Format: PDF, Docs
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From 1505 to 1689, Russia's tsars chose their wives through an elaborate ritual: the bride-show. The realm's most beautiful young maidens—provided they hailed from the aristocracy—gathered in Moscow, where the tsar's trusted boyars reviewed their medical histories, evaluated their spiritual qualities, noted their physical appearances, and confirmed their virtue. Those who passed muster were presented to the tsar, who inspected the candidates one by one—usually without speaking to any of them—and chose one to be immediately escorted to the Kremlin to prepare for her wedding and new life as the tsar's consort. Alongside accounts of sordid boyar plots against brides, the multiple marriages of Ivan the Terrible, and the fascinating spectacle of the bride-show ritual, A Bride for the Tsar offers an analysis of the show's role in the complex politics of royal marriage in early modern Russia. Russell E. Martin argues that the nature of the rituals surrounding the selection of a bride for the tsar tells us much about the extent of his power, revealing it to be limited and collaborative, not autocratic. Extracting the bride-show from relative obscurity, Martin persuasively establishes it as an essential element of the tsarist political system.

Russia s Steppe Frontier

Author: Michael Khodarkovsky
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253217709
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Khodarkovsky provides a detailed chronological narrative of Russia's steppe relations, which conveys brilliantly the depth of Moscow's engagement in the world of steppe politics.... This is counterbalanced by insightful thematic discussion of the perennial issues involved.... Altogether, an excellent study of a vital dimension of Russia's historical evolution." —Slavonic and East European Review "... the first connected account of Moscow's assertion of military and political control over its steppe frontier. The book's scope is impressive, as it traces the transformation of a turbulent steppe frontier into an imperial borderland.... a signal contribution to our understanding of European history." —American Historical Review Drawing on sources and archival materials in Russian and Turkic languages, Russia's Steppe Frontier presents a complex picture of the encounter between indigenous peoples and the Russians. An original and invaluable resource for understanding Russia's imperial experience.

Can Russia Modernise

Author: Alena V. Ledeneva
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107310431
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this original, bottom-up account of the evolution of contemporary Russia, Alena Ledeneva seeks to reveal how informal power operates. Concentrating on Vladimir Putin's system of governance - referred to as sistema - she identifies four key types of networks: his inner circle, useful friends, core contacts and more diffuse ties and connections. These networks serve sistema but also serve themselves. Reliance on networks enables leaders to mobilise and to control, yet they also lock politicians, bureaucrats and businessmen into informal deals, mediated interests and personalised loyalty. This is the 'modernisation trap of informality': one cannot use the potential of informal networks without triggering their negative long-term consequences for institutional development. Ledeneva's perspective on informal power is based on in-depth interviews with sistema insiders and enhanced by evidence of its workings brought to light in court cases, enabling her to draw broad conclusions about the prospects for Russia's political institutions.

A Concise History of Russia

Author: Paul Bushkovitch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139504444
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Accessible to students, tourists and general readers alike, this book provides a broad overview of Russian history since the ninth century. Paul Bushkovitch emphasizes the enormous changes in the understanding of Russian history resulting from the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. Since then, new material has come to light on the history of the Soviet era, providing new conceptions of Russia's pre-revolutionary past. The book traces not only the political history of Russia, but also developments in its literature, art and science. Bushkovitch describes well-known cultural figures, such as Chekhov, Tolstoy and Mendeleev, in their institutional and historical contexts. Though the 1917 revolution, the resulting Soviet system and the Cold War were a crucial part of Russian and world history, Bushkovitch presents earlier developments as more than just a prelude to Bolshevik power.

The Limits of Empire European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History

Author: William Reger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317025334
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This volume, published in honor of historian Geoffrey Parker, explores the working of European empires in a global perspective, focusing on one of the most important themes of Parker’s work: the limits of empire, which is to say, the centrifugal forces - sacral, dynastic, military, diplomatic, geographical, informational - that plagued imperial formations in the early modern period (1500-1800). During this time of wrenching technological, demographic, climatic, and economic change, empires had to struggle with new religious movements, incipient nationalisms, new sea routes, new military technologies, and an evolving state system with complex new rules of diplomacy. Engaging with a host of current debates, the chapters in this book break away from conventional historical conceptions of empire as an essentially western phenomenon with clear demarcation lines between the colonizer and the colonized. These are replaced here by much more fluid and subtle conceptions that highlight complex interplays between coalitions of rulers and ruled. In so doing, the volume builds upon recent work that increasingly suggests that empires simply could not exist without the consent of their imperial subjects, or at least significant groups of them. This was as true for the British Raj as it was for imperial China or Russia. Whilst the thirteen chapters in this book focus on a number of geographic regions and adopt different approaches, each shares a focus on, and interest in, the working of empires and the ways that imperial formations dealt with - or failed to deal with - the challenges that beset them. Taken together, they reflect a new phase in the evolving historiography of empire. They also reflect the scholarly contributions of the dedicatee, Geoffrey Parker, whose life and work are discussed in the introductory chapters and, we’re proud to say, in a delightful chapter by Parker himself, an autobiographical reflection that closes the book.