State Power and Community in Early Modern Russia

Author: B. Davies
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230000649
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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State, Power and Community in Early Modern Russia is a vivid reconstruction of life in one of the garrison towns built on Muscovy's southern steppe frontier in the early Seventeenth-century to defend against Tatar raids. It focuses on how the colonization process shaped power relations in a particular southern garrison community, both at the village level, within the land commune, and at the district level, between the general garrison community and the appointed officials representing state authority.

The Russian Empire 1450 1801

Author: Nancy Shields Kollmann
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191082708
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Modern Russian identity and historical experience has been largely shaped by Russia's imperial past: an empire that was founded in the early modern era and endures in large part today. The Russian Empire 1450-1801 surveys how the areas that made up the empire were conquered and how they were governed. It considers the Russian empire a 'Eurasian empire', characterized by a 'politics of difference': the rulers and their elites at the center defined the state's needs minimally - with control over defense, criminal law, taxation, and mobilization of resources - and otherwise tolerated local religions, languages, cultures, elites, and institutions. The center related to communities and religions vertically, according each a modicum of rights and autonomies, but didn't allow horizontal connections across nobilities, townsmen, or other groups potentially with common interests to coalesce. Thus, the Russian empire was multi-ethnic and multi-religious; Nancy Kollmann gives detailed attention to the major ethnic and religious groups, and surveys the government's strategies of governance - centralized bureaucracy, military reform, and a changed judicial system. The volume pays particular attention to the dissemination of a supranational ideology of political legitimacy in a variety of media - written sources and primarily public ritual, painting, and particularly architecture. Beginning with foundational features, such as geography, climate, demography, and geopolitical situation, The Russian Empire 1450-1801 explores the empire's primarily agrarian economy, serfdom, towns and trade, as well as the many religious groups - primarily Orthodoxy, Islam, and Buddhism. It tracks the emergence of an 'Imperial nobility' and a national self-consciousness that was, by the end of the eighteenth century, distinctly imperial, embracing the diversity of the empire's many peoples and cultures.

The Limits of Empire European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History

Author: William Reger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317025334
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume, published in honor of historian Geoffrey Parker, explores the working of European empires in a global perspective, focusing on one of the most important themes of Parker’s work: the limits of empire, which is to say, the centrifugal forces - sacral, dynastic, military, diplomatic, geographical, informational - that plagued imperial formations in the early modern period (1500-1800). During this time of wrenching technological, demographic, climatic, and economic change, empires had to struggle with new religious movements, incipient nationalisms, new sea routes, new military technologies, and an evolving state system with complex new rules of diplomacy. Engaging with a host of current debates, the chapters in this book break away from conventional historical conceptions of empire as an essentially western phenomenon with clear demarcation lines between the colonizer and the colonized. These are replaced here by much more fluid and subtle conceptions that highlight complex interplays between coalitions of rulers and ruled. In so doing, the volume builds upon recent work that increasingly suggests that empires simply could not exist without the consent of their imperial subjects, or at least significant groups of them. This was as true for the British Raj as it was for imperial China or Russia. Whilst the thirteen chapters in this book focus on a number of geographic regions and adopt different approaches, each shares a focus on, and interest in, the working of empires and the ways that imperial formations dealt with - or failed to deal with - the challenges that beset them. Taken together, they reflect a new phase in the evolving historiography of empire. They also reflect the scholarly contributions of the dedicatee, Geoffrey Parker, whose life and work are discussed in the introductory chapters and, we’re proud to say, in a delightful chapter by Parker himself, an autobiographical reflection that closes the book.

By Honor Bound

Author: Nancy Shields Kollmann
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801434358
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Russians from all ranks of society were bound together by a culture of honor. In this book, one of the foremost scholars of early modern Russia explores the intricate and highly stylized codes that made up this culture. Drawing on a rich array of archival and published sources, Nancy Shields Kollmann describes how these codes were manipulated to construct identity and enforce social norms - and also to defend against insults, to pursue vendettas, and generally to unsettle communities. She offers compelling evidence for a new view of the relationship of state and society in the Russian empire, and her richly comparative approach enhances knowledge of statebuilding in premodern Europe.

Empire and Military Revolution in Eastern Europe

Author: Brian Davies
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 144116880X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In terms of resource mobilization and devastation the wars between Russia, the Crimean Khanate and the Ottoman Empire were some of the largest of the 18th century, and had enormous consequences for the balance of power in Eastern Europe. Brian Davies examines how these conflicts characterized the course of Russian military development in response to Ottoman and Crimean Tatar threats and to determine under what circumstances and in what ways Russian military power experienced a "revolution" awarding it clear preponderance over the Ottoman-Crimean system. A central part of Davies' argument is that identifying and explaining a Military Revolution must involve examining the role of factors not purely military. One must look not only at new military technology, new force and command structure, new tactical thinking, and new recruitment and military finance practices but also consider the impact of larger demographic, economic, and sociopolitical changes.

Warfare State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe 1500 1700

Author: Brian Davies
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134552831
Format: PDF
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This crucial period in Russia's history has, up until now, been neglected by historians, but here Brian L. Davies' study provides an essential insight into the emergence of Russia as a great power. For nearly three centuries, Russia vied with the Crimean Khanate, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire for mastery of the Ukraine and the fertile steppes above the Black Sea, a region of great strategic and economic importance – arguably the pivot of Eurasia at the time. The long campaign took a great toll upon Russia's population, economy and institutions, and repeatedly frustrated or redefined Russian military and diplomatic projects in the West. The struggle was every bit as important as Russia's wars in northern and central Europe for driving the Russian state-building process, forcing military reform and shaping Russia's visions of Empire.

Warfare in Eastern Europe 1500 1800

Author: Brian Davies
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004221964
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A comparative examination of military development in early modern Eastern Europe, focusing on Russian, Polish-Lithuanian, Ottoman, Habsburg, Cossack, and Western European mercenary practice.

Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Russia

Author: Nancy Kollmann
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139577018
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This is a magisterial account of the day-to-day practice of Russian criminal justice in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Nancy Kollmann contrasts Russian written law with its pragmatic application by local judges, arguing that this combination of formal law and legal institutions with informal, flexible practice contributed to the country's social and political stability. She also places Russian developments in the broader context of early modern European state-building strategies of governance and legal practice. She compares Russia's rituals of execution to the 'spectacles of suffering' of contemporary European capital punishment and uncovers the dramatic ways in which even the tsar himself, complying with Moscow's ideologies of legitimacy, bent to the moral economy of the crowd in moments of uprising. Throughout, the book assesses how criminal legal practice used violence strategically, administering horrific punishments in some cases and in others accommodating with local communities and popular concepts of justice.