Strasburg Rail Road

Author: Eric S. Conner and Steve Barrall
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467125075
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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When the Strasburg Rail Road was chartered in 1832, no one anticipated the myriad of obstacles the short line would encounter. What began as an afterthought in the early 19th century eventually became one of America's premier steam train excursions and the most visited heritage railroad in the continental United States. By 1957, the declining condition of its rails and the lack of freight and passenger service seemed to mark the end of the railroad, but it was given new life in 1958, and not even the wildest imagination foresaw the remarkable transformation and development this "Methuselah of railroads" would undergo. This book chronicles the unlikely success of America's oldest continuously operating railroad. Explore how and why Strasburg's four-and-a-half-mile line survived, and discover the story behind its ascension to prominence as an iconic, internationally known, small-town steam railroad.

Scranton Railroads

Author: David Crosby
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738565187
Format: PDF, ePub
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Founded as a small iron-making community, Scranton gained prominence as the "anthracite capital of the world" for the rich deposits of hard coal surrounding the city. Five railroads eventually served Scranton, attracted by the lucrative anthracite trade. The viability of these lines became directly linked to the coal industry, and the decline of this traffic in the 1950s had a devastating impact on the railroad industry in the northeastern United States. Following decades of decline, abandonments, and mergers, an unparalleled resurgence of freight traffic coupled with the development of "heritage railroading" has transformed Scranton into a destination for tourists and rail historians alike.

Horseshoe Curve

Author: David W. Seidel
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738557076
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Horseshoe Curve is known worldwide as an engineering achievement by the Pennsylvania Railroad. This landmark, located just west of Altoona, opened to traffic on February 15, 1854, and it enabled a railroad line to climb the Allegheny Mountains and the eastern continental divide. The Horseshoe Curve's construction impacted railroad design and development for mountainous terrain everywhere, enabling access to coal and other raw materials essential for the industrial age. J. Edgar Thomson, chief engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad, is widely recognized for his engineering and design of the Horseshoe Curve, a concept never utilized previously. Today the curve is still in use and sees approximately 70 trains daily. Through vintage photographs, Horseshoe Curve chronicles how this marvel remains one of the vital transportation arteries linking the east and west coasts of the United States.

Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania

Author: Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Publisher: Stackpole Books
ISBN: 9780811729567
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A guidebook to the museum in Strasburg, Pennsylvania, covering the history of the state's railroad industry, with a tour of the 100,000-square-foot exhibit hall, which displays dozens of historic locomotives and rolling stock significant to Pennsylvania's railroad heritage. A complete checklist of the museum's collection of rolling stock is included.

Street Railways of El Paso

Author: Ronald E. Dawson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738571140
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Spanish explorers traveling north from Mexico in 1581 crossed the Rio Grande at present-day El Paso and called the area El Paso Del Norte, or "the pass of the north." Two cities were linked together: Ciudad Juarez and El Paso. In 1881, the railroad brought even more people to El Paso. What had been a sleepy adobe town became a vibrant, bustling city. Public transportation was established with a mule-car system in 1882 and ran for 20 years. The first electric cars were introduced in 1902 and were also very successful, serving all parts of the city and establishing neighborhoods. At the zenith of the system, there were 63 miles of track, 17 routes, and over 100 streetcars. In those days, everyone used the electric cars.

Clark s Trading Post and the White Mountain Central Railroad

Author: Linda Eisenhart
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467129100
Format: PDF, Docs
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In 1928, Edward and Florence Clark opened a roadside attraction in Lincoln, New Hampshire, for visitors to the White Mountains. Ed Clark's Eskimo Sled Dog Ranch featured guided tours with its purebred Eskimo sled dogs and artifacts from Labrador, Canada. "The Stand" offered souvenirs, tonic, and maple products to motorists. Three black bears, Soggle, Toggle, and Woggle, joined the family in 1935, and the bears acted as the perfect visual attraction, gaining the attention of curious passersby. In 1949, Ed and Murray, sons of Florence and Edward, began training black bears for show work. The Clark brothers and their bears delighted guests with humor and hospitality as they entertained and educated the audience. Generations later, that philosophy lives on as the Clarks offer bear shows, rides on the White Mountain Central Railroad, family entertainment, and good, honest fun to visitors. There are up to 20 family members working at Clark's Trading Post on any given day, including fifth-generation descendants. All photographs used in the book are from the Clark family archives.

Pennsylvania Main Line Railroad Stations Philadelphia to Harrisburg

Author: Jim Sundman
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467116777
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"In 1857, the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) took over Pennsylvania's Main Line of Public Works, a state-owned railroad and canal system built in the 1830s. Costly to build and maintain, and never attracting the traffic needed to sustain it, the state was eager to let it go. Keeping the rail portion and combining it with its own lines, the PRR ultimately developed a well-built and well-run rail line from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh all while keeping the "main line" moniker. The eastern section between Philadelphia and Harrisburg was especially successful, particularly after the railroad built new communities along the line that were at first summer destinations and later year-round homes for daily commuters. Other towns and cities along the main line had a strong industrial or agricultural base needing rail access, and many of these communities had attractive train stations. Images of America: Pennsylvania Main Line Railroad Stations: Philadelphia to Harrisburg documents many of these passenger stations through vintage photographs and other images. Most are gone, but fortunately some still stand and are in use today."--From back cover.

Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge

Author: Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467124192
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Sunnyside Yard was built by the Pennsylvania Railroad as part of its massive New York Extension, the centerpiece of which was Pennsylvania Station in the heart of Manhattan. Opened in 1910, it is still the world's largest railroad passenger car storage yard. At the height of its operation in the 1930s, there were 79 tracks, with a capacity for 1,100 cars. Hell Gate Bridge was a joint venture of the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New Haven Railroad to construct a direct rail route for trains between New York City and the New England states. The main span is 1,017 feet between the towers, and it rises more than 300 feet from the East River to the top of the towers.