Teaching American History in a Global Context

Author: Carl J. Guarneri
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317459016
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This comprehensive resource is an invaluable teaching aid for adding a global dimension to students' understanding of American history. It includes a wide range of materials from scholarly articles and reports to original syllabi and ready-to-use lesson plans to guide teachers in enlarging the frame of introductory American history courses to an international view.The contributors include well-known American history scholars as well as gifted classroom teachers, and the book's emphasis on immigration, race, and gender points to ways for teachers to integrate international and multicultural education, America in the World, and the World in America in their courses. The book also includes a 'Views from Abroad' section that examines problems and strategies for teaching American history to foreign audiences or recent immigrants. A comprehensive, annotated guide directs teachers to additional print and online resources.

Global Americans

Author: Maria Montoya
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337515698
Format: PDF, Mobi
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GLOBAL AMERICANS speaks to an increasingly diverse population of students who seek to understand the place of the United States in a shifting global, social, cultural, and political landscape. America’s national experience and collective history have always been subject to transnational forces and affected by global events and conditions. In recognition of this reality, this insightful new text presents a history of North America and then the United States in which world events and processes are central rather than colorful sidelights. The narrative recovers the global aspects of America’s past and helps students understand the origins of the interconnected world in which they live. By weaving together stories, analysis, interpretation, visual imagery, and primary sources from across time and place, this book presents a revised history that reflects America’s -- and Americans’ -- relationship to events and peoples across the continent and beyond. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Remembering America

Author: Lawrence R. Samuel
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803280858
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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American history is ubiquitous, underscoring everything from food to travel to architecture and design. It is also emotionally charged, frequently crossing paths with political and legal issues. In Remembering America, Lawrence R. Samuel examines the place that American history has occupied within education and popular culture and how it has continually shaped and reflected our cultural values and national identity. The story of American history, Samuel explains, is not a straight line but rather one filled with twists and turns and ups and downs, its narrative path as winding as that of the United States as a whole. Organized around six distinct eras of American history ranging from the 1920s to the present, Samuel shows that our understanding of American history has often generated struggle and contention as ideologically opposed groups battled over ownership of the past. As women and minorities gained greater power and a louder voice in the national conversation, our perspectives on American history became significantly more multicultural, bringing race, gender, and class issues to the forefront. These new interpretations of our history helped to reshape our identity on both a national and an individual level. Samuel argues that the fight for ownership of our past, combined with how those owners have imparted history to our youth, crucially affects who we are. Our interpretation and expression of our country’s past reflects how that self-identity has changed over the last one hundred years and created a strong sense of our collective history—one of the few things Americans all have in common.

Foreign Relations

Author: Donna R. Gabaccia
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400842220
Format: PDF, ePub
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Histories investigating U.S. immigration have often portrayed America as a domestic melting pot, merging together those who arrive on its shores. Yet this is not a truly accurate depiction of the nation's complex connections to immigration. Offering a brand-new global history of the subject, Foreign Relations takes a comprehensive look at the links between American immigration and U.S. foreign relations. Donna Gabaccia examines America’s relationship to immigration and its debates through the prism of the nation’s changing foreign policy over the past two centuries. She shows that immigrants were not isolationists who cut ties to their countries of origin or their families. Instead, their relations to America were often in flux and dependent on government policies of the time. An innovative history of U.S. immigration, Foreign Relations casts a fresh eye on a compelling and controversial topic.

America on the World Stage

Author: Gary W. Reichard
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252075528
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A fresh perspective on United States history, emphasizing a global context

America Compared Since 1865

Author: Carl J. Guarneri
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780618318575
Format: PDF
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Ideal for instructors seeking to present U.S. history in a global context, this innovative reader pairs comparative readings on key issues such as slavery, immigration, imperialism, civil rights, and western expansion. Introductions to the selections provide historical context for the issue at hand, background information on the countries being compared, and discussion of ideas or arguments contained in the selections.

Global Americans A History of the United States

Author: Maria Montoya
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0618833102
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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GLOBAL AMERICANS speaks to an increasingly diverse population of students who seek to understand the place of the United States in a shifting global, social, cultural, and political landscape. America’s national experience and collective history have always been subject to transnational forces and affected by global events and conditions. In recognition of this reality, this insightful new text presents a history of North America and then the United States in which world events and processes are central rather than colorful sidelights. The narrative recovers the global aspects of America’s past and helps students understand the origins of the interconnected world in which they live. By weaving together stories, analysis, interpretation, visual imagery, and primary sources from across time and place, this book presents a revised history that reflects America’s -- and Americans’ -- relationship to events and peoples across the continent and beyond. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Why You Can t Teach United States History without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469621215
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.

Teaching American History

Author: Gary J. Kornblith
Publisher: Bedford/st Martins
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Teaching American History: Essays Adapted from the Journal of American History, 2001-2007 brings together a selection of articles from the "Textbooks and Teaching" section of the Journal of American History. Editors Gary J. Kornblith and Carol Lasser have compiled a set of thought-provoking essays from a wide range of top scholars that helps instructors of the U.S. survey consider pedagogy, assessment, re-centered narratives, "uncoverage," as well as textbooks and other course materials. Each part of the book focuses on a different aspect of teaching the survey. Part I introduces an on-line roundtable discussion on teaching the U.S. survey. Part II features articles reflecting on the role of the textbook in the U.S. survey. Part III, "Teaching Outside the Box," contains a selection of articles on incorporating sports, theater, oral history, field experience, service learning, field trips, and the Web into teaching and learning. Part IV challenges teachers to think about the connection between teaching, learning, and testing. Finally, Part V includes articles about bringing the narratives of marginalized people to the center of American history.

Historians Across Borders

Author: Nicolas Barreyre
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520279298
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In this stimulating and highly original study of the writing of American history, twenty-four scholars from eleven European countries explore the impact of writing history from abroad. Six distinguished scholars from around the world add their commentaries. Arguing that historical writing is conditioned, crucially, by the place from which it is written, this volume identifies the formative impact of a wide variety of institutional and cultural factors that are commonly overlooked. Examining how American history is written from Europe, the contributors shed light on how history is written in the United States and, indeed, on the way history is written anywhere. The innovative perspectives included in Historians across Borders are designed to reinvigorate American historiography as the rise of global and transnational history is creating a critical need to understand the impact of place on the writing and teaching of history. This book is designed for students in historiography, global and transnational history, and related courses in the United States and abroad, for US historians, and for anyone interested in how historians work.