Teaching and Learning English Literature

Author: Ellie Chambers
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1847877230
Format: PDF, Kindle
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'It is scarcely possible to imagine a truly educated person who cannot read well. Yet it is not clear how or even if courses in literature actually work. How can teachers of English help students in their developmental journey toward becoming skillful readers and educated persons? This is the complex question that Chambers and Gregory address in Teaching and Learning English Literature. The authors consider practical matters such as course design and student assessment but do not shirk larger historical and theoretical issues. In a lucid and non-polemical fashion - and occasionally with welcome humor - Chambers and Gregory describe the what, why, and how of "doing" literature, often demonstrating the techniques they advocate. Veteran teachers will find the book rejuvenating, a stimulus to examining purposes and methods; beginning teachers may well find it indispensable' - Professor William Monroe, University of Houston 'The transatlantic cooperation of Ellie Chambers and Marshall Gregory has produced an outstanding book that ought to be on the shelves of anyone involved in the teaching of English Literature, as well as anyone engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning in general or in any discipline. As they say, "the teaching of English Literature plays a central role in human beings' search for meaning" although others in other disciplines may make this claim for theirs too. If so, they will still learn a great deal from this book; anyone looking for no more than a means of satisfying the demands of governments that look for simplistic quality measures and economic relevance, let them look elsewhere. This is a book for now and for all times' - Professor Lewis Elton, Visiting Professor, University of Manchester, Honorary Professor, University College London This is the third in the series Teaching and Learning the Humanities in Higher Education. The book is for beginning and experienced teachers of literature in higher education. The authors present a comprehensive overview of teaching English literature, from setting teaching goals and syllabus-planning through to a range of student assessment strategies and methods of course or teacher evaluation and improvement. Particular attention is paid to different teaching methods, from the traditional classroom to newer collaborative work, distance education and uses of electronic technologies. All this is set in the context of present-day circumstances and agendas to help academics and those in training become more informed and better teachers of their subject. The book includes: - how literature as a discipline is currently understood and constituted - what it means to study and learn the subject - what 'good teaching' is, with fewer resources for teaching, larger student numbers, an emphasis on 'user-pay' principles and vocationalism. This is an essential text for teachers of English Literature in universities and colleges worldwide. The Teaching & Learning in the Humanities series, edited by Ellie Chambers and Jan Parker, is for beginning and experienced lecturers. It deals with all aspects of teaching individual arts and humanities subjects in higher education. Experienced teachers offer authoritative suggestions on how to become critically reflective about discipline-specific practices.

Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities

Author: Stephen Siperstein
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317423232
Format: PDF, Docs
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Climate change is an enormous and increasingly urgent issue. This important book highlights how humanities disciplines can mobilize the creative and critical power of students, teachers, and communities to confront climate change. The book is divided into four clear sections to help readers integrate climate change into the classes and topics they are already teaching as well as engage with interdisciplinary methods and techniques. Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities constitutes a map and toolkit for anyone who wishes to draw upon the strengths of literary and cultural studies to teach valuable lessons that engage with climate change.

A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Format: PDF, ePub
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Globally Networked Teaching in the Humanities

Author: Alexandra Schultheis Moore
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317625579
Format: PDF, Docs
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As colleges and universities in North America increasingly identify "internationalization" as a key component of the institution’s mission and strategic plans, faculty and administrators are charged with finding innovative and cost-effective approaches to meet those goals. This volume provides an overview and concrete examples of globally-networked learning environments across the humanities from the perspective of all of their stakeholders: teachers, instructional designers, administrators and students. By addressing logistical, technical, pedagogical and intercultural aspects of globally-networked teaching, this volume offers a unique perspective on this form of curricular innovation through internationalization. It speaks directly to the ways in which new technologies and pedagogies can promote humanities-based learning for the future and with it the broader essential skills of intercultural sensitivity, communication and collaboration, and critical thinking.

Teaching and Learning History

Author: Geoff Timmins
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761947738
Format: PDF, Mobi
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'This book, informed by exceptionally wide inquiry into current history teaching practices in the English-speaking world, is a real achievement. The authors convey current context and challenges with great insight, and they move through possibilities in sequencing, content, skills and assessment, without strident comment, extending our knowledge of options and pitfalls in the process' - Peter N. Stearns, Provost, George Mason University 'Comprehensive, persuasive, and at all times accessible in style and argument, this text both encourages and empowers university historians to review and enhance their teaching practices. All key facets of programme development are explored with reference to an extensive and well-chosen range of international examples. The chapter on the historian's skills and qualities of mind is one of several that I will be referring to frequently' - Jeanine Graham, Senior Lecturer, History, University of Waikato '... the varied findings make fascinating reading ... this book should be required reading for everyone involved in teaching history: there is plenty here for us all to learn from' - ESCalate 'In providing such a clear, informative and thoughtful exploration of the current state of history in higher education, and in helping to raise the quality of critical debate about its future, this book contributes greatly to the growing scholarship of teaching and learning in the discipline. It should also become a vital resource for all historians who wish to honour the old dictum that, in teaching as in research, the one duty we owe history is to rewrite it' - Professor Paul Hyland, Director of History in the Subject Centre for History, Classics and Archaeology '[E]xtremely useful... provides a thought-provoking and useful discussion concerning the task of actually teaching history at university level... This timely book needs to be read widely, and the many issues it raises should command our closest attention' - Higher Education Review Over the last 10 years or so, history as an academic discipline has become steeped in controversy and introspection. Additional areas of interest have opened up, fresh perspectives and approaches have been offered, and new teaching and learning strategies have been advocated. There has been an increasing emphasis on producing well-qualified graduates equipped with the skills, knowledge and attitudes to cope with the changing demands of the world of work. This book suggests how these issues may be managed. The authors identify and discuss the underlying principles, and consider ways in which they can be applied at module and programme levels. The Teaching & Learning in the Humanities series, edited by Ellie Chambers and Jan Parker, is for beginning and experienced lecturers. It deals with all aspects of teaching individual arts and humanities subjects in higher education. Experienced teachers offer authoritative suggestions on how to become critically reflective about discipline-specific practices.

Service Learning and Literary Studies in English

Author: Laurie Grobman
Publisher: Modern Language Association of America
ISBN: 9781603292016
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Service learning can help students develop a sense of civic responsibility and commitment, often while addressing pressing community needs and having positive, lasting effects on the communities engaged. One important goal of literary studies is to understand the ethical dimensions of the world, and thus service learning, by broadening and complicating the environments students consider, is well suited to the literature classroom. Whether through a public literacy project that demonstrates the relevance of literary study or community-based research that brings literary theory to life, student collaboration with community partners brings social awareness to the study of literary texts and helps students and teachers engage literature in new ways. In their introduction to Service Learning and Literary Studies in English, the volume editors trace the history of service learning in the United States, including the debate about literature's role, and outline the best practices of the pedagogy. The essays that follow cover American literature, English and world literature, creative nonfiction and memoir, literature-based writing, and cross-disciplinary studies. Contributors describe a wide variety of service-learning projects, including a course on the Harlem Renaissance in which students lead a community writing workshop, an English capstone seminar in which seniors design programs for public libraries, and a creative nonfiction course in which first-year students work with elderly community members to craft life narratives. The volume closes with a list of resources for practitioners and researchers in the field.

Successful University Teaching in Times of Diversity

Author: Nicola Rolls
Publisher: Palgrave
ISBN: 9781137536686
Format: PDF, Docs
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The book offers a lively, engaging and potentially transformative introduction to the ideas, insights and practical know-how that a modern university teacher requires. Bringing together contributors with extensive practical teaching experience as well as pedagogical expertise, it uses accessible language and real cases to explore everyday teaching challenges and provide strategies and techniques for stimulating deep and satisfying learning.

The Art of Freedom Teaching the Humanities to the Poor

Author: Earl Shorris
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393081273
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A book describing the author's astonishing success in bringing the study of the humanities to poor people in many cultures through The Clemente Course in the Humanities, work for which he was awarded a National Medal in the Humanities by President Clinton. It shows, often through lively anecdote, the crucial difference that understanding ones own culture and history makes in improving and empowering poor people. The last chapter of the book will describe the introduction, this year, of the CCH into a major US public school system, as a pilot program in one of the poorest black high schools in Chicago.

Team based Learning in the Social Sciences and Humanities

Author: Michael Sweet
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 1579226108
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a unique, powerful, and proven form of small-group learning that is being increasingly adopted in higher education to achieve high levels of student engagement, critical thinking, and retention. TBL has been used successfully in both small and large classes, in computer-supported and online classes, in nearly every discipline, and in countries around the world. This book introduces the practical elements of TBL and how to apply them in the social sciences and humanities, paying particular attention to the specification of learning goals, which can be a unique challenge in our fields. The core of the book consists of examples of how TBL has been incorporated into the cultures of disciplines as varied as economics, education, literature, politics, psychology, and theatre. At a time of increasing course sizes, and emphasis on learning outcomes, TBL offers the means to meet such demands while helping students learn course content in deeper and more accessible ways than they have in the past.