Teaching College Writing to Diverse Student Populations

Author: Dana Ferris
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472033379
Format: PDF, ePub
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Statistical and anecdotal evidence documents that even states with relatively little ethnic or cultural diversity are beginning to notice and ask questions about long-term resident immigrants in their classes. As shifts in student population become more widespread, there is an even greater need for second language specialists, composition specialists, program administrators, and developers in colleges and universities to understand and adapt to the needs of the changing student audience(s). This book is designed as an introduction to the topic of diverse second language student audiences in U.S. post-secondary education. It is appropriate for those interested in working with students in academic settings, especially those students who are transitioning from secondary to post-secondary education. It provides a coherent synthesis and summary not only of the scope and nature of the changes but of their practical implications for program administration, course design, and classroom instruction, particularly for writing courses. For pre-service teachers and those new(er) to the field of working with L2 student writers, it offers an accessible and focused look at the “audience” issues with many practical suggestions. For teacher-educators and administrators, it offers a resource that can inform their own decision-making.

Generation 1 5 Meets College Composition

Author: Linda Harklau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135678596
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An increasing number of students graduate from U.S. high schools and enter college while still in the process of learning English. This group--the "1.5 generation"--consisting of immigrants and U.S. residents born abroad as well as indigenous language minority groups, is rapidly becoming a major constituency in college writing programs. These students defy the existing categories in most college writing programs, and in the research literature. Experienced in American culture and schooling, they have characteristics and needs distinct from the international students who have been the subject of most research and literature on ESL writing. Furthermore, in studies of mainstream college composition, basic writing, and diversity, these students' status as second-language learners is usually left unaddressed or even misconstrued as underpreparation. Nevertheless, research and pedagogical writings have yet to take up the particular issues entailed in teaching composition to this student population. The intent in this volume is to bridge this gap and to initiate a dialogue on the linguistic, cultural, and ethical issues that attend teaching college writing to U.S.-educated linguistically diverse students. This book is the first to address explicitly issues in the instruction of "1.5 generation" college writers. From urban New York City to midwestern land grant universities to the Pacific Rim, experienced educators and researchers discuss a variety of contexts, populations, programs, and perspectives. The 12 chapters in this collection, authored by prominent authorities in non-native language writing, are research based and conceptual, providing a research-based survey of who the students are, their backgrounds and needs, and how they are placed and instructed in a variety of settings. The authors frame issues, raise questions, and provide portraits of language minority students and the classrooms and programs that serve them. Together, the pieces paint the landscape of college writing instruction for 1.5 generation students and explore the issues faced by ESL and college writing programs in providing appropriate writing instruction to second-language learners arriving from U.S. high schools. This book serves not only to articulate an issue and set an agenda for further research and discussion, but also to suggest paths toward linguistic and cultural sensitivity in any writing classroom. It is thought-provoking reading for college administrators, writing teachers, and scholars and students of first- and second-language composition.

Dialogue on Writing

Author: Geraldine DeLuca
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135647526
Format: PDF, ePub
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Designed for courses on theories and methods of teaching college writing, this text is distinguished by its emphasis on giving teachers a foundation of knowledge for teaching writing to a diverse student body. As such, it is equally relevant for teacher training in basic writing, ESL, and first year composition, the premise being that in most colleges and universities today teachers of each of these types of courses encounter similar student populations and teaching challenges. Many instructors compile packets of articles for this course because they cannot find an appropriate collection in one volume. This text fills that gap. It includes in one volume: *the latest thinking about teaching and tutoring basic writing, ESL, and first year composition students; *seminal articles, carefully selected to be accessible to those new to the field, by classic authors in the field of composition and ESL, as well as a number of new voices; *attention to both theory and practice, but with an emphasis on practice; and *articles about non-traditional students, multiculturalism, and writing across the disciplines. The text includes suggestions for pedagogy and invitations for exploration to engage readers in reflection and in applications to their own teaching practice.

Transnational Writing Program Administration

Author: David S. Martins
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 0874219620
Format: PDF, Kindle
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While local conditions remain at the forefront of writing program administration, transnational activities are slowly and thoroughly shifting the questions we ask about writing curricula, the space and place in which writing happens, and the cultural and linguistic issues at the heart of the relationships forged in literacy work. Transnational Writing Program Administration challenges taken-for-granted assumptions regarding program identity, curriculum and pedagogical effectiveness, logistics and quality assurance, faculty and student demographics, innovative partnerships and research, and the infrastructure needed to support writing instruction in higher education. Well-known scholars and new voices in the field extend the theoretical underpinnings of writing program administration to consider programs, activities, and institutions involving students and faculty from two or more countries working together and highlight the situated practices of such efforts. The collection brings translingual graduate students at the forefront of writing studies together with established administrators, teachers, and researchers and intends to enrich the efforts of WPAs by examining the practices and theories that impact our ability to conceive of writing program administration as transnational. This collection will enable writing program administrators to take the emerging locations of writing instruction seriously, to address the role of language difference in writing, and to engage critically with the key notions and approaches to writing program administration that reveal its transnationality.

Linguistically Diverse Immigrant and Resident Writers

Author: Christina Ortmeier-Hooper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317298039
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Spotlighting the challenges and realities faced by linguistically diverse immigrant and resident students in U.S. secondary schools and in their transitions from high school to community colleges and universities, this book looks at programs, interventions, and other factors that help or hinder them as they make this move. Chapters from teachers and scholars working in a variety of contexts build rich understandings of how high school literacy contexts, policies such as the proposed DREAM Act and the Common Core State Standards, bridge programs like Upward Bound, and curricula redesign in first-year college composition courses designed to recognize increasing linguistic diversity of student populations, affect the success of this growing population of students as they move from high school into higher education.

The Education of Diverse Student Populations

Author: Guofang Wan
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402082045
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book takes up the challenge of examining the thorniest educational issue from a global perspective. It contributes to the evidence-based conversation among policy makers, educators, and researchers around the world about what works to improve the education outcomes and what can make a bigger difference for the education of diverse students. The eleven countries included — the United Kingdom, Austria, Canada, the United States, South Africa, Ghana, China, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, and New Zealand are unique, and yet overlap in the sense that they all face similar challenges of teaching diverse students. The authors, being education and cultural insiders, discuss country-specific policies, efforts, and best practices in the education of diverse students; share stories of success and failure; and explore current best practices from global, social, political, and economic perspectives. Built on previous theories and research, it describes diverse students’ experiences in the global and information age, and searches for effective policies and practices that help these students to perform better in school and in life. Readers are forced to step outside of their own experiences and commonly held beliefs about education. Conscious recognition that there are other ways of doing things may result in new approaches that we have not explored before. We hope the insights, lessons, and conclusions drawn from examining this pressing education issue from a global perspective will help nations to better understand and deal with it in their own educational system.

A New World of Writers

Author: Elaine Freedman Fredericksen
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780820455006
Format: PDF, ePub
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Most secondary school, college, and university students no longer fit into the -traditional- mold. Although they are from a variety of ethnic, language, and social backgrounds, each with different needs, writing can provide a key to success for them all. <I>A New World of Writers offers teaching methodologies that can be adapted to these new and changing student populations, enabling them to approach writing tasks with confidence and enthusiasm."

Real World Writing for Secondary Students

Author: Jessica Singer Early
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772356
Format: PDF
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One of the most important ways to scaffold a successful transition from high school to college is to teach real-world, gate-opening writing genres, such as college admission essays. This book describes a writing workshop for ethnically and linguistically diverse high school students, where students receive instruction on specific genre features of the college admission essay. The authors present both the theoretical grounding and the concrete strategies teachers crave, including an outline of specific workshop lessons, teaching calendars, and curricular suggestions. This text encourages secondary teachers to think of writing as a vital tool for all students to succeed academically and professionally. Appropriate for courses and teacher professional development, this accessible book: Reconceptualizes the ways in which writing can best serve marginalized students.Examines research-based curricular and teaching approaches for the secondary school classroom.Provides a writing workshop framework for creating a college admissions essay complete with lesson-planning materials, activities, handouts, bibliographic resources, and more.Includes student perspectives and work samples, offering insight into the lives and struggles of diverse adolescents. In this important book, Jessica Early and Meredith DeCosta describe a readily replicable set of activities that provides motivated, meaningful opportunities for writing development and helps potential first-generation higher education students gain university admission. From the Foreword byCharles Bazerman, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, University of California Santa Barbara This is a book about opening doors, about demystifying writing tasks that can keep many students on the outside. The authors take on a major writing challenge the college application essay and through careful instruction help students use their real life stories to master it. It is teaching at its best, and democracy at its best. Thomas Newkirk, University of New Hampshire This groundbreaking book has the best qualities of an exemplary research study while also providing us with a handbook of practical wisdom and engaging lessons for teaching writing to a diverse population of secondary students. It is certain to inspire and instruct all English teachers and composition researchers who care about helping traditionally marginalized and underprepared students discover and demonstrate that they are qualified to enter college. Sheridan Blau, Teachers College, Columbia University"

The Discovery of Competence

Author: Eleanor Kutz
Publisher: Boynton/Cook Pub
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book documents a ten-year collaboration, which was itself a journey of discovery. It offers an account of the authors' work together, through which they came to appreciate their students' capacities as writers and learners, and tells how their thinking about teaching was transformed in the process. The Discovery of Competence shows how the writing classroom can be reconceived as an environment for collaborative inquiry by students and teachers. It presents new ways of thinking about program design, redefines the nature of writing assessment, and offers alternative conceptions of multicultural curricula. Drawing on students' writing and research, it suggests how teachers can recognize their students' competence and help them build on it systematically in the writing classroom. While the book speaks to all teachers of writing, it will be of considerable interest to those who work with diverse student populations, including ESL students. The authors make it clear that the writing classroom is not simply a place for certifying that students can demonstrate the linguistic practices of the university, but a place where both students and their teachers may build on their competence and realize their possibilities as writers and learners.