Teaching the Silk Road

Author: Jacqueline M. Moore
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438431031
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Advocating a global as opposed to a Eurocentric perspective in the college classroom, discusses why and how to teach about China’s Silk Road. The romance of the Silk Road journey, with its exotic locales and luxury goods, still excites the popular imagination. But study of the trade routes between China and central Asia that flourished from about 200 BCE to the 1500s can also greatly enhance contemporary higher education curricula. Indeed, with people, plants, animals, ideas, and beliefs traversing it, the Silk Road is both a metaphor of globalization and an early example of it. Teaching the Silk Road highlights the reasons to incorporate this material into a variety of courses and shares resources to facilitate that process. It is intended for those who are not Silk Road or Asian specialists but who wish to embrace a global history and civilizations perspective in teaching, as opposed to the more traditional approach that focuses on cultures in isolation. The book explores both classroom and experiential learning and is intentionally interdisciplinary. Each essay focuses on pedagogical strategies or themes that teachers can use to bring the Silk Road into the classroom. “Based on years of experience, the authors of Teaching the Silk Road offer sound strategies for both stand-alone courses on aspects of the route and mainstreaming what has been uncovered in three decades of research into existing courses in a variety of disciplines.” — H-Net Reviews (H-Asia) “This collection of essays and personal reflections allows the reader to listen in on a relaxed conversation on teaching the topic of the Silk Road. It offers a nice blueprint for integrating the Silk Road into new or existing curricula.” — J. Michael Farmer, author of The Talent of Shu: Qiao Zhou and the Intellectual World of Early Medieval Sichuan

An Introduction to Chinese Culture through the Family

Author: Howard Giskin
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791450475
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
An Introduction to Chinese Culture through the Family covers a central element of Chinese culture, the idea of family, or jia. Written for both beginners and specialists, this book considers the role of family--literally, metaphorically, and as an organizing principle--in the creation of the Chinese worldview. Individual chapters explore philosophy, art, language, music, folk literature, fiction, architecture, film, and women and gender.

Cow Boys and Cattle Men

Author: Jacqueline M. Moore
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814757391
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Why do killers deserve punishment? How should the law decide? These are the questions Samuel H. Pillsbury seeks to answer in this important new book on the theory and practice of criminal responsibility. In an argument both traditional and fresh, Pillsbury holds that persons deserve punishment according to the evil they choose to do, regardless of their psychological capacities. Using real case examples, he offers concrete proposals for legal reform, urging that modern preoccupations with subjective aspects of wrongdoing be replaced with rules that focus more on the individual's motives.

The New Silk Road Diplomacy

Author: Hasan H. Karrar
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 077485894X
Format: PDF
Download Now
With the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, independent states such as Kazakhstan sprang up along China's western frontier. Suddenly, Beijing was forced to confront internal challenges to its authority at its border as well as international competition for energy and authority in Central Asia. Hasan Karrar traces how China cooperated with Russia and the Central Asian republics to stabilize the region, facilitate commerce, and build an energy infrastructure to import the region's oil. While China's gradualist approach to Central Asia prioritized multilateral diplomacy, it also brought Beijing into direct competition with the United States, which views Central Asia as vital to its strategic interests.

The Journey of Maps and Images on the Silk Road

Author: Philippe Forêt
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9047424972
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Drawing on evidence from the many civilizations that shared the Silk Road, this book examines specific cases of the mobility of maps and images through the centuries.

Booker T Washington W E B Du Bois and the Struggle for Racial Uplift

Author: Jacqueline M. Moore
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780842029940
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This book traces the argument between Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois, which began in 1903 when Du Bois published The Souls of Black Folk, which included an attack on Washington, his association with Tuskegee Institute's industrial education program, and accommodationism. The clash between Du Bois and Washington escalated over the next 12 years. Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Struggle for Racial Uplift is an excellent resource for courses in African American history, race relations, and minority and ethnic politics.

Student Study Guide to The Ancient Chinese World

Author: Terry Kleeman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190293608
Format: PDF
Download Now
The Student Study Guides are important and unique components that are available for each of the books in The World in Ancient Times series. Each of the Student Study Guides is designed to be used with the main text at school or sent home for homework assignments. The activities in the Student Study guide will help students get the most out of their history books. Each student study guide includes a chapter-by-chapter two-page lesson that uses a variety of interesting activities to help a student master history and develop important reading and study skills.

Leading the Race

Author: Jacqueline M. Moore
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813919034
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Historians of the African American experience after Reconstruction have tended to imply that the black elite served only their own interests, that their exclusive control of black institutions precluded efforts to improve the status of African Americans in general. In Leading the Race, Jacqueline M. Moore reevaluates the role of this black elite by examining how their self-interest interacted with the needs of the black community in Washington, D.C., the center of black society at the turn of the century. Immediately following Reconstruction, black elites did concern themselves with creating social distinctions, but, Moore argues, the conditions of Jim Crow segregation quickly forced their transformation into a racially conscious group. Studying this transformation in detail, Moore focuses on Washington, D.C., whose leading men and women would be equalled in brilliance only by those of Harlem in the 1920s. The small group who made up a black social elite in Washington from 1880 to 1920 faced many challenges to their economic and social status. The rise of segregation and disenfranchisement of African Americans in the South led to disillusionment with the Reconstruction promise of biracial cooperation and assimilation, and the end of Home Rule in the District cut the few political ties between blacks and whites. In the struggle to maintain their status, the black elite created new strategies of racial advancement that tied them inseparably to the black community while establishing their claim to lead it. This new elite became more open to men and women of exceptional abilities and achievements, basing judgments on merit rather than on family background or skin color. As these blacks lost faith in assimilation, they began to build a solid community base from which to speak out against racism.