Teaching U S History

Author: Diana Turk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135184259
Format: PDF, Docs
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Teaching U.S. History offers an innovative approach to social studies teaching by connecting historians to real-world social studies classrooms and social studies teachers. In an unusual, even unprecedented, dialogue between scholars and practitioners, this book weds historical theory and practice with social studies pedagogy. Seven chapters are organized around key US History eras and events from the time of slavery through the Civil Rights Movement and are complemented by detailed discussions of a particular methodological approach, including primary source analysis, oral history and more. Interviews with historians open each chapter to bring the reader into important conversations about the most cutting edge issues in U.S. history today and are followed by essays from expert teachers on the rewards and challenges of implementing these topics in the classroom. Each chapter also includes a wealth of practical resources including suggested key documents or artifacts; a lesson plan for middle school and another suitable for high school; and suggested readings and questions for further study. Teaching U.S. History is a must read for any aspiring or current teacher who wants to think critically about how to teach U.S. history and make historical discussions come alive in the school classrooms where the nation’s students learn.

Teaching Recent Global History

Author: Diana B. Turk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136638369
Format: PDF, ePub
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Teaching Recent Global History explores innovative ways to teach world history, beginning with the early 20th century. The authors’ unique approach unites historians, social studies teachers, and educational curriculum specialists to offer historically rich, pedagogically innovative, and academically rigorous lessons that help students connect with and deeply understand key events and trends in recent global history. Highlighting the best scholarship for each major continent, the text explores the ways that this scholarship can be adapted by teachers in the classroom in order to engage and inspire students. Each of the eight main chapters highlights a particularly important event or theme, which is then complemented by a detailed discussion of a particular methodological approach. Key features include: • An overarching narrative that helps readers address historical arguments; • Relevant primary documents or artifacts, plus a discussion of a particular historical method well-suited to teaching about them; • Lesson plans suitable for both middle and secondary level classrooms; • Document-based questions and short bibliographies for further research on the topic. This invaluable book is ideal for any aspiring or current teacher who wants to think critically about how to teach world history and make historical discussions come alive for students.

Inspiring Participatory Democracy

Author: Tom Hayden
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317257499
Format: PDF
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The famous 1962 Port Huron Statement by the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) introduced the concept of participatory democracy to popular discourse and practice. In Inspiring Participatory Democracy Tom Hayden, one of the principal architects of the statement, analyses its historical impact and relevance to today's movements. Inspiring Participatory Democracy includes the full transcript of the Port Huron statment and shows how it played an important role in the movements for black civil rights, against the Vietnam war and for the Freedom of Information Act. Published during the year of Port Huron's 50th anniversary, Inspiring Participatory Democracy will be of great interest to readers interested in social history, politics and social activism.

Whitewashing War

Author: Christopher Leahey
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807771686
Format: PDF, ePub
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Whitewashing War explores perhaps the most critical issue social studies educators presently face: How do we teach our students about war? In this timely book, Christopher Leahey investigates how the political struggles over the social studies curriculum, the corporate domination of the textbook and testing industry, and the curricular constraints of the No Child Left Behind Act combine to stifle historical inquiry and deprive students of meaningful social studies instruction. Using the controversial Vietnam War as a case study, Leahey holds textbook narratives up to the light, illuminating how the adoption process, interpretive framework, and selection of evidence combine to transform the past into thinly veiled historical myths. By attending to questions traditionally ignored in history education, this dynamic book: Challenges educators to rethink their pedagogical approaches to military conflict, American and otherwise. Calls on teachers to develop students’ critical sensibilities to ask questions, conduct research, evaluate evidence, and make meaning of the past. Provides classroom lessons for history educators and students to engage in rich, intellectual encounters with the historical record. Christopher R. Leahey teaches world history in upstate New York. His articles have appeared in Social Education and The Social Studies. “If students are to be prepared for the challenges of the 21st century, then we need to provide inspired, interdisciplinary instruction that can provide the skills, values and knowledge to enable our future citizens with the possibility, promise, and perspective to transform their world. Whitewashing War provides that solid interdisciplinary framework for teachers and students to teach and learn about the myth of war.” —Critical Education “Leahey echoes a concern expressed by others that history textbooks fail to address the realities of war.” —CHOICE “The crowning achievement of Whitewashing War is that it clearly illustrates the necessity of pursuing rational answers about why things are as they are (or were as they were). It becomes clear upon reading this book that, if we help our students pursue rational answers in the course of creating personally meaningful understandings of the world, they will figure out just what it is that needs to be done.” —From the Foreword by E. Wayne Ross, University of British Columbia “The author has done a masterful job of exploring issues of historiography, pedagogy, textbook debates, and critical thinking. Through a deep examination of two historical turning points in the Vietnam War, he has contrasted the known facts of these periods with the accounts contained in the textbooks.” —Rick Ayers, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley “A passionate and powerful analysis. Christopher Leahey provides penetrating insight into how Americans teach about their wars. As such, his book is an invaluable aid to understanding the past and its connection to our current predicament.” —Fredrik Logevall, Cornell University “Whitewashing War challenges the fundamental assumptions underlying the corporate regime of standards, textbooks, and testing and exposes the distortions, manipulation, and lies that result. Leahey builds a compelling case for critical inquiry and dialogue. Highly recommended!” —Ronald W. Evans, San Diego State University, author of The Social Studies Wars

Rebellion in Black and White

Author: Robert Cohen
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421408503
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Rebellion in Black and White offers a panoramic view of how southern students promoted desegregation, racial equality, free speech, academic freedom, world peace, gender equity, sexual liberation, Black Power, and the personal freedoms associated with the counterculture of the decade."--Page 4 of cover.

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Format: PDF, Docs
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

The Idea of History

Author: Robin George Collingwood
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0192853066
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Newly restored and re-edited edition of the philosophic classic.

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too

Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807028029
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in science classrooms as a young man of color, Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on and approach to teaching in urban schools. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike--both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally"--

Teacher Education for Diversity

Author: Elizabeth Walton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351806572
Format: PDF
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Foregrounding the diversity that characterises various educational settings, this book discusses how histories and geographies of oppression, exclusion and marginalisation have impacted on teacher education. Contributors draw on first-hand experiences of living and working in countries including Brazil, China, South Africa, New Zealand and Malawi. Positioned in a geographical and metaphorical ‘Global South’, the book draws critical attention to debates which have been otherwise marginalised in relation to those conducted in the ‘Global North’. Chapters address difference and diversity on both a conceptual and empirical level, acknowledging the significance of various global trends including increased migration and urbanisation; and broadening understandings of race, religion, gender, sexuality and dis/ability. Taken together, these chapters reveal the extent of the work which still remains to be done in the field of teacher education for diversity. The issues discussed are of global significance, making this text key reading for teachers, teacher educators, and those concerned with the advancement of social justice and reduction of inequality through education.

Becoming Teachers of Inner city Students

Author: James C. Jupp
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462093717
Format: PDF
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Becoming Teachers of Inner-city Students takes on the continuing challenges of White teachers in increasingly de facto re-segregated schools of the present. Drawing on the author’s eighteen years of experience as a classroom teacher and his research on White teachers of inner-city students, Becoming Teachers provides key discussions on professional identity for preservice teachers, professional educators, and researchers interested in diversity education or urban education. Driving at complex recognitions of race, class, culture, language, and gender as a basis for teaching and learning with diverse urban students, the author’s and other White teachers’ life and teaching stories move beyond prescriptive models of professional identity for preservice and professional teachers to “follow.” Instead, life and teaching stories in Becoming Teachers demonstrate again and again that in teaching the personal is political, professional knowledges are forged in practice, and – overall – that becoming a professional teacher is a process that draws on one’s experiences and inner-most convictions. Becoming Teachers, updating Vivian Paley’s White Teacher and reworking Christine Sleeter’s multicultural research on White teachers’ race-evasive identities, moves discussions on White teacher identity toward a second wave of race-visible professional identity for White teachers in the present. James Jupp’s book is an instruction on how to keep the democratic educational experiment on the workbench... – Roger Slee, Professor and Director of the Victoria Institute for Education, Diversity, and Life Long Learning at Victoria University, Melbourne James Jupp thoughtfully explicates the complexity of the social justice literature in education related to race, class, culture, language, gender and other differences in classrooms. Jupp is one of the leading scholars in education who challenges static notions of difference and opens up new curriculum spaces for a second wave of critical race work. Challenging the field to consider more nuanced possibilities that will advance social justice in the present, Jupp provides generous readings for new intercultural alliances. Jupp’s Becoming Teachers of Inner-city Students offers a fresh understanding for those who are looking for new ways to understand teachers’ lives and professional identities. – Patrick Slattery, Professor of Curriculum, Texas A&M University Jupp does the hard work, here, of understanding where we have been in conceptualizing the racial identities of White teachers. And then he does something harder. With abundant intelligence, courage, and generosity, Jupp opens up new pathways for our thinking and feeling and action. Read this book. – Timothy Lensmire, Associate Professor of Curriculum & Instruction, University of Minnesota