The Adams Jefferson Letters

Author: Lester J. Cappon
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807838926
Format: PDF, ePub
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An intellectual dialogue of the highest plane achieved in America, the correspondence between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson spanned half a century and embraced government, philosophy, religion, quotidiana, and family griefs and joys. First meeting as delegates to the Continental Congress in 1775, they initiated correspondence in 1777, negotiated jointly as ministers in Europe in the 1780s, and served the early Republic--each, ultimately, in its highest office. At Jefferson's defeat of Adams for the presidency in 1800, they became estranged, and the correspondence lapses from 1801 to 1812, then is renewed until the death of both in 1826, fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence. Lester J. Cappon's edition, first published in 1959 in two volumes, provides the complete correspondence between these two men and includes the correspondence between Abigail Adams and Jefferson. Many of these letters have been published in no other modern edition, nor does any other edition devote itself exclusively to the exchange between Jefferson and the Adamses. Introduction, headnotes, and footnotes inform the reader without interrupting the speakers. This reissue of The Adams-Jefferson Letters in a one-volume unabridged edition brings to a broader audience one of the monuments of American scholarship and, to quote C. Vann Woodward, 'a major treasure of national literature.'

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Religion and Politics in the U S

Author: Barbara A. McGraw
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470657332
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Religion and Politics in the U.S. provides a broad, inclusive, and rich range of chapters, in the study of religion and politics. Arranged in their historical context, chapters address themes of history, law, social and religious movements, policy and political theory. Broadens the parameters of this timely subject, and includes the latest work in the field Draws together newly-commissioned essays by distinguished authors that are cogent for scholars, while also being in a style that is accessible to students. Provides a balanced and inclusive approach to religion and politics in the U.S. Engages diverse perspectives from various discourses about religion and politics across the political and disciplinary spectra, while placing them in their larger historical context

Abigail and John Adams

Author: G. J. Barker-Benfield
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226037444
Format: PDF, Docs
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During the many years that they were separated by the perils of the American Revolution, John and Abigail Adams exchanged hundreds of letters. Writing to each other of public events and private feelings, loyalty and love, revolution and parenting, they wove a tapestry of correspondence that has become a cherished part of American history and literature. With Abigail and John Adams, historian G. J. Barker-Benfield mines those familiar letters to a new purpose: teasing out the ways in which they reflected—and helped transform—a language of sensibility, inherited from Britain but, amid the revolutionary fervor, becoming Americanized. Sensibility—a heightened moral consciousness of feeling, rooted in the theories of such thinkers as Descartes, Locke, and Adam Smith and including a “moral sense” akin to the physical senses—threads throughout these letters. As Barker-Benfield makes clear, sensibility was the fertile, humanizing ground on which the Adamses not only founded their marriage, but also the “abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity” they and their contemporaries hoped to plant at the heart of the new nation. Bringing together their correspondence with a wealth of fascinating detail about life and thought, courtship and sex, gender and parenting, and class and politics in the revolutionary generation and beyond, Abigail and John Adams draws a lively, convincing portrait of a marriage endangered by separation, yet surviving by the same ideas and idealism that drove the revolution itself. A feast of ideas that never neglects the real lives of the man and woman at its center, Abigail and John Adams takes readers into the heart of an unforgettable union in order to illuminate the first days of our nation—and explore our earliest understandings of what it might mean to be an American.

Founding Friendships

Author: Cassandra A. Good
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199376182
Format: PDF
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"When Harry Met Sally" is only the most iconic of popular American movies, books, and articles that pose the question of whether friendships between men and women are possible. In Founding Friendships, Cassandra A. Good shows that this question was embedded in and debated as far back as the birth of the American nation. Indeed, many of the nation's founding fathers had female friends but popular rhetoric held that these relationships were fraught with social danger, if not impossible. Elite men and women formed loving, politically significant friendships in the early national period that were crucial to the individuals' lives as well as the formation of a new national political system, as Cassandra Good illuminates. Abigail Adams called her friend Thomas Jefferson "one of the choice ones on earth," while George Washington signed a letter to his friend Elizabeth Powel with the words "I am always Yours." Their emotionally rich language is often mistaken for romance, but by analyzing period letters, diaries, novels, and etiquette books, Good reveals that friendships between men and women were quite common. At a time when personal relationships were deeply political, these bonds offered both parties affection and practical assistance as well as exemplified republican values of choice, freedom, equality, and virtue. In so doing, these friendships embodied the core values of the new nation and represented a transitional moment in gender and culture. Northern and Southern, famous and lesser known, the men and women examined in Founding Friendships offer a fresh look at how the founding generation defined and experienced friendship, love, gender, and power.

First Thoughts

Author: Edith Belle Gelles
Publisher: Twayne Pub
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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"The Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party, two Continental Congresses and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution and the War of 1812, the presidencies of George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson - all these events occurred during the lifetime of Abigail Adams. Adams, in a voluminous body of correspondence, recorded in vivid detail not only these historic events but also their effects on her community, her family, and herself. Too often viewed narrowly as the wife of John Adams and the mother of John Quincy Adams, Abigail Adams was an important literary and historical figure in her own right. Her letters are filled with perceptive observations; they demonstrate great spontaneity, intelligence, and sincerity; and they depict in equal measure both the quotidian and the historic during the early years of the Republic." "Asserting that Abigail Adams's collected letters are "the best account that exists from the pre- to the post-Revolutionary period in America of a woman's life and world," Edith B. Gelles, a noted Adams expert and the author of Portia: The World of Abigail Adams, presents this first study to examine Adams's letters from the dual standpoints of biography and literary analysis. Adopting a topical, episodic approach, Gelles highlights Adams's letter-writing persona while giving due recognition to her achievements as wife, mother, sister, daughter friend, and patriot."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved