The Apache Wars

Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Publisher: Crown Pub
ISBN: 0770435815
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"Describes the violent history between the frontiersmen and the Native Americans in the Southwestern borderlands by following Mickey Free, a mixed-blood warrior who played a pivotal role in the fighting as he pursued the Apache Kid."--NoveList.

The Apache Wars

Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0770435831
Format: PDF, Mobi
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They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides-the Apaches and the white invaders-blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who moved uneasily between the worlds of the Apaches and the American soldiers, he was never trusted by either but desperately needed by both. A fellow scout described him simply as ohalf-Irish, half-Mexican, and all son-of-a-bitch.o He was the only man Geronimo ever feared. He played a pivotal role in this long war for the desert Southwest from its beginning in 1861 until its end in 1890 with his pursuit of the renegade scout Apache Kid. This is Mickey Free's story but also the story of his contemporaries- the great Apache leaders Mangas Coloradas, Cochise, and Victorio; the soldiers Kit Carson, O. O. Howard, George Crook, and Nelson Miles; the scouts and frontiersmen Al Sieber, Tom Horn, Tom Jeffords, and Texas John Slaughter; the great White Mountain scout Alchesay and the Apache female warrior Lozen; the fierce Apache warrior Geronimo; and the Apache Kid. These lives shaped the violent history of the deserts and mountains of the Southwestern borderlands-a bleak and unforgiving world where the one-eyed, deeply scarred Mickey Free was at home.

The Apache Wars

Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0770435823
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the tradition of Empire of the Summer Moon, a stunningly vivid historical account of the manhunt for Geronimo and the 25-year Apache struggle for their homeland. They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides--the Apaches and the white invaders—blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who moved uneasily between the worlds of the Apaches and the American soldiers, he was never trusted by either but desperately needed by both. He was the only man Geronimo ever feared. He played a pivotal role in this long war for the desert Southwest from its beginning in 1861 until its end in 1890 with his pursuit of the renegade scout, Apache Kid. In this sprawling, monumental work, Paul Hutton unfolds over two decades of the last war for the West through the eyes of the men and women who lived it. This is Mickey Free's story, but also the story of his contemporaries: the great Apache leaders Mangas Coloradas, Cochise, and Victorio; the soldiers Kit Carson, O. O. Howard, George Crook, and Nelson Miles; the scouts and frontiersmen Al Sieber, Tom Horn, Tom Jeffords, and Texas John Slaughter; the great White Mountain scout Alchesay and the Apache female warrior Lozen; the fierce Apache warrior Geronimo; and the Apache Kid. These lives shaped the violent history of the deserts and mountains of the Southwestern borderlands--a bleak and unforgiving world where a people would make a final, bloody stand against an American war machine bent on their destruction.

Phil Sheridan and His Army

Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806176571
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Paul Hutton’s study of Phil Sheridan in the West is authoritative, readable, and an important contribution to the literature of westward expansion. Although headquartered in Chicago, Sheridan played a crucial role in the opening of the West. His command stretched from the Missouri to the Rockies and from Mexico to Canada, and all the Indian Wars of the Great Plains fell under his direction. Hutton ably narrates and interprets Sheridan’s western career from the perspective of the top command rather than the battlefield leader. His book is good history and good reading."–Robert M. Utley

Apache Voices

Author: Sherry Robinson
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
ISBN: 0826318487
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the 1940s and 1950s, long before historians fully accepted oral tradition as a source, Eve Ball (1890-1984) was taking down verbatim the accounts of Apache elders who had survived the army's campaigns against them in the last century. These oral histories offer new versions--from Warm Springs, Chiricahua, Mescalero, and Lipan Apache--of events previously known only through descriptions left by non-Indians. A high school and college teacher, Ball moved to Ruidoso, New Mexico, in 1942. Her house on the edge of the Mescalero Apache Reservation was a stopping-off place for Apaches on the dusty walk into town. She quickly realized she was talking to the sons and daughters of Geronimo, Cochise, Victorio, and their warriors. After winning their confidence, Ball would ultimately interview sixty-seven people. Here is the Apache side of the story as told to Eve Ball. Including accounts of Victorio's sister Lozen, a warrior and medicine woman who was the only unmarried woman allowed to ride with the men, as well as unflattering portrayals of Geronimo's actions while under attack, and Mescalero scorn for the horse thief Billy the Kid, this volume represents a significant new source on Apache history and lifeways. "Sherry Robinson has resurrected Eve Ball's legacy of preserving Apache oral tradition. Her meticulous presentation of Eve's shorthand notes of her interviews with Apaches unearths a wealth of primary source material that Eve never shared with us. "Apache Voices is a must read!"--Louis Kraft, author of Gatewood & Geronimo "Sherry Robinson has painstakingly gathered from Eve Ball's papers many unheard Apache voices, especially those of Apache women. This work is a genuine treasure trove. In the future, no one who writes about the Apaches or the conquest of Apacheria can ignore this collection."--Shirley A. Leckie, author of Angie Debo: Pioneering Historian

ONCE THEY MOVED LIKE THE WIND COCHISE GERONIMO

Author: David Roberts
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451639880
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During the westward settlement, for more than twenty years Apache tribes eluded both US and Mexican armies, and by 1886 an estimated 9,000 armed men were in pursuit. Roberts (Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative) presents a moving account of the end of the Indian Wars in the Southwest. He portrays the great Apache leaders—Cochise, Nana, Juh, Geronimo, the woman warrior Lozen—and U.S. generals George Crock and Nelson Miles. Drawing on contemporary American and Mexican sources, he weaves a somber story of treachery and misunderstanding. After Geronimo's surrender in 1886, the Apaches were sent to Florida, then to Alabama where many succumbed to malaria, tuberculosis and malnutrition and finally in 1894 to Oklahoma, remaining prisoners of war until 1913. The book is history at its most engrossing. —Publishers Weekly

Indeh

Author: Ethan Hawke
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
ISBN: 1455564109
Format: PDF, ePub
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INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The year is 1872. The place, the Apache nations, a region torn apart by decades of war. The people, like Goyahkla, lose his family and everything he loves. After having a vision, the young Goyahkla approaches the Apache leader Cochise, and the entire Apache nation, to lead an attack against the Mexican village of Azripe. It is this wild display of courage that transforms the young brave Goyakhla into the Native American hero Geronimo. But the war wages on. As they battle their enemies, lose loved ones, and desperately cling on to their land and culture, they would utter, "Indeh," or "the dead." When it looks like lasting peace has been reached, it seems like the war is over. Or is it? INDEH captures the deeply rich narrative of two nations at war-as told through the eyes of Naiches and Geronimo-who then try to find peace and forgiveness. INDEH not only paints a picture of some of the most magnificent characters in the history of our country, but it also reveals the spiritual and emotional cost of the Apache Wars. Based on exhaustive research, INDEH offers a remarkable glimpse into the raw themes of cultural differences, the horrors of war, the search for peace, and, ultimately, retribution. The Apache left an indelible mark on our perceptions about the American West, and INDEH shows us why.

Mickey Free

Author: Allan Radbourne
Publisher:
ISBN:
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"On January 27, 1861, an Apache raiding party attacked John Ward's ranch in the Sonoita Valley of southeastern Arizona and carried off Ward's thirteen-year-old stepson, Felix Telles. Thus began a remarkable odyssey in which a young Mexican American boy was transformed into an Apache warrior and eventually served as Indian Scout for the U.S. Army. Nicknamed "Mickey Free," after a popular fictional character ... he moved effortlessly between three cultures and [became a major participant in the Southwest Indian conflicts]. In this thoughtful and engaging biography, Allan Radbourne employs three decades of research in archival records, printed sources, and Apache oral tradition to tell the story of Mickey Free and the Indian Scouts who played hitherto unappreciated roles in the Apache wars of the 1870s and 1880s and the application of reservation policy"--Fly leaf.

Al Sieber

Author: Dan L. Thrapp
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806188669
Format: PDF, ePub
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General George Crook planned and organized the principal Apache campaign in Arizona, and General Nelson Miles took credit for its successful conclusion on the 1800s, but the men who really won it were rugged frontiersmen such as Al Sieber, the renowned Chief of Scouts. Crook relied on Sieber to lead Apache scouts against renegade Apaches, who were adept at hiding and raiding from within their native terrain. In this carefully researched biography, Dan L. Thrapp gives extensive evidence for Sieber’s expertise, noting that the expeditions he accompanied were highly successful whereas those from which he was absent met with few triumphs. Perhaps the greatest tribute to his abilities was paid by a San Carlos Apache who, no matter how miserable life might become, because, he said, Sieber would find him even if he left no tracks.

Geronimo

Author: Geronimo
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1626366845
Format: PDF, Docs
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First published in 1906, Geronimo is the collaborative work between Geronimo, chief of the Chiricahua Apache, and author S. M. Barrett. The latter was given special permission from President Theodore Roosevelt to interview Geronimo while he was a prisoner of war at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. What Barrett recorded is a blunt, firsthand account of the twenty-five years Geronimo spent fighting the U.S. government. In Geronimo, the famous Native American discusses the history of the Apache people—where they came from, their early life, and their tribal customs and manners. Geronimo expresses his personal views on how the white men who settled in the West negatively affected his tribe, from wrongs done to his people and removal from their homeland to Geronimo’s imprisonment and forced surrender. “I am thankful that the President of the United States has given me permission to tell my story. I hope that he and those in authority under him will read my story and judge whether my people have been rightly treated.” —Geronimo This is the perfect book for anyone interested in the history of America and its native peoples, and this true-life account—from one of the most well-known figures in our country’s history—is both thrilling and sobering.