The Atchafalaya River Basin

Author: Bryan P. Piazza
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623490391
Format: PDF, Docs
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In this comprehensive, one-volume reference, Nature Conservancy scientist Bryan P. Piazza poses five key questions: —What is the Atchafalaya River Basin? —Why is it important? —How have its hydrology and natural habitats been managed? —What is its current state? —How do we ensure its survival? For more than five centuries, the Atchafalaya River Basin has captured the flow of the Mississippi River, becoming its main distributary as it reaches the Gulf of Mexico in south Louisiana. This dynamic environment, comprising almost a million acres of the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Mississippi River Deltaic Plain, is perhaps best known for its expansive swamp environments dominated by baldcypress, water tupelo, and alligators. But the Atchafalaya River Basin contains a wide range of habitats and one of the highest levels of biodiversity on the North American continent. Piazza has compiled and synthesized the body of scientific knowledge for the Atchafalaya River Basin, documenting the ecological state of the basin and providing a baseline of understanding. His research provides a crucial resource for future planning. He evaluates some common themes that have emerged from the research and identifies important scientific questions that remain unexplored.

Designing the Bayous

Author: Martin Reuss
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 160344632X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Originally published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, this history of the Louisiana Atchafalaya Basin was hailed as a balanced yet unflinching account of the transformation of an area that has endured perhaps more human manipulation than any other natural environment in the nation. Reuss provides a new preface to bring us up-to-date on the state of the basin, which remains both an engineering contrivance and natural wonder.

River Music

Author: Ann McCutchan
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603443223
Format: PDF
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"Louisiana?s Atchafalaya River Basin, the heart and soul of Acadiana, or Cajun country, is the focus of this compelling narrative by Ann McCutchan. A masterful weaving of cultural and environmental history, River Music also tells the life story of Louisiana musician, naturalist, and sound documentarian Earl Robicheaux. With Robicheaux as her guide, McCutchan embarks on a musical, visual, literary, and historical tour of the Atchafalaya, where bayous, swamps, marshes, and river delta country have long sustained nature and culture, even as industry has changed both the landscape and the people. Along the way, she and Robicheaux pay homage to distinctive voices of the region?s singular soundscape, including Acadian and Native American elders, birds, frogs, alligators, wind, water, and weather, which Robicheaux chronicles in archival recordings and musical compositions for museum exhibits, radio programs, and repositories such as the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. A CD of Robicheaux's soundscapes is included with the book"--Dust jacket flap.

Islands in the Rainforest

Author: Stéphen Rostain
Publisher: Left Coast Press
ISBN: 1598746340
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Covers the area between the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, the Cassiquiare Canal, and the Atlantic Ocean (Guyana, French Guiana, Suriname, parts of Brazil, parts of Venezuela).

The Louisiana Coast

Author: Gay M. Gomez
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 160344033X
Format: PDF, ePub
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A extensively illustrated guide to Louisiana's endangered and sensitive coastal wetland environment in the wake of Hurricane Katrina looks at the effects of the region on human life while exploring its vast network of bayous, natural levees, cypress swamps, marshes, and barrier islands, as well as the flora and fauna that make the wetlands their home.

C C Lockwood s Atchafalaya

Author: C. C. Lockwood
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807132593
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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At nearly 1.4 million acres, the Atchafalaya Basin in south central Louisiana comprises America's largest swamp wilderness. Award-winning nature photographer C. C. Lockwood is the foremost chronicler of this natural treasure. What began as a curious side-trip in 1973 became a decades-long love affair, and for more than thirty years, Lockwood has explored the Atchafalaya's waters and captured its haunting beauty on film. Now, twenty-five years after the publication of his first book, he returns to his favorite subject in C. C. Lockwood's Atchafalaya. Lockwood revisits and reflects on the places he has frequented most in the swamp, recalling his escapades both long past and recent among gators and skeeters. He shares the thoughts of basin residents about how the Atchafalaya has changed over time, for better and for worse. Increases and decreases in various bird and other animal populations, changes in water levels and consistency, flora mainstays and trees gone missing, burgeoning aquatic vegetation - all are keenly observed by this explorer. Lockwood finds undiminished the seductive seasonal and diurnal moods of the swamp: autumn and spring, sunset and moonrise, as breathtaking now as in the past. In nearly one hundred color photographs, Lockwood documents the Atchafalaya's timeless beauty. He shows amazingly diverse and abundant wildlife, rookeries with thousands of egrets and herons, waters with billions of crawfish, and ridges with deer, squirrel, and woodcock. Waters run deep in Lockwood's soul, as evidenced in his intimate treatment of the meandering bayous fringed with bald cypress trees, the many glassy lakes reflecting vegetation into double images, and the mighty Atchafalaya River - the lifeline of the swamp.

The World s Largest Wetlands

Author: Lauchlan H. Fraser
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521834049
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Experts share their understanding of the ecology of large wetlands, their significance and their conservation.

A World After Climate Change and Culture Shift

Author: Jim Norwine
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400773536
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this book, an international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century (c.2100). This book begins by detailing the current state of knowledge about these two ongoing, accelerating and potentially world-transforming changes: climate change, in the form of global warming, and a profound emerging shift of normative cultural condition toward the assumptions and values often associated with so-called postmodernity, such as tolerance, diversity, self-referentiality, and dubiety replaced with certainty. Next, the contributors imagine, explain and debate the most likely consequent transformations of human and natural ecologies and economies that will take place by the end of the 21st-century. In 16 compellingly original, provocative and readable chapters, A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift presents a one-of-a-kind vision of our current age as a “hinge” or axial century, one driven by the most radical combined change of nature and culture since the rise of agriculture at the end of the last Ice Age some 10 millennia ago. This book is highly recommended to scholars and students of the environmental and social sciences, as well as to all readers interested in how changes in nature and culture will work together to reshape our world and ourselves. "I cannot think of a book more geared to advancing the art and science of geography." - Yi-Fu Tuan, J. K. Wright and Vilas Professor Emeritus of Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison "Outstanding," "unique," and "exceptional timeliness of topic and ambition ofvision". - Richard Marston, University Distinguished Professor, Kansas State University; past president, Association of American Geographers

An Empire of Air and Water

Author: Siobhan Carroll
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812246780
Format: PDF, ePub
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Planetary spaces such as the poles, the oceans, the atmosphere, and subterranean regions captured the British imperial imagination. Intangible, inhospitable, or inaccessible, these blank spaces—what Siobhan Carroll calls "atopias"—existed beyond the boundaries of known and inhabited places. The eighteenth century conceived of these geographic outliers as the natural limits of imperial expansion, but scientific and naval advances in the nineteenth century created new possibilities to know and control them. This development preoccupied British authors, who were accustomed to seeing atopic regions as otherworldly marvels in fantastical tales. Spaces that an empire could not colonize were spaces that literature might claim, as literary representations of atopias came to reflect their authors' attitudes toward the growth of the British Empire as well as the part they saw literature playing in that expansion. Siobhan Carroll interrogates the role these blank spaces played in the construction of British identity during an era of unsettling global circulations. Examining the poetry of Samuel T. Coleridge and George Gordon Byron and the prose of Sophia Lee, Mary Shelley, and Charles Dickens, as well as newspaper accounts and voyage narratives, she traces the ways Romantic and Victorian writers reconceptualized atopias as threatening or, at times, vulnerable. These textual explorations of the earth's highest reaches and secret depths shed light on persistent facets of the British global and environmental imagination that linger in the twenty-first century.