The Best Poor Man s Country

Author: James T. Lemon
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393008043
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
In many respects early Pennsylvania was the prototype of North American development. Its conservative defense of liberal individualism, its population of mixed national and religious origins, its dispersed farms, county seats, and farm-service villages, and its mixed crop and livestock agriculture served as models for much of the rural Middle West. To many western Europeans in the eighteenth century life in early Pennsylvania offered a veritable paradise and refuge from oppression. Some called it "the best poor man's country in the world." The Best Poor Man's Country was the winner of the Albert J. Beveridge Award of the American Historical Society.

Converging Worlds

Author: Louise A. Breen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136596747
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Providing a survey of colonial American history both regionally broad and "Atlantic" in coverage, Converging Worlds presents the most recent research in an accessible manner for undergraduate students. With chapters written by top-notch scholars, Converging Worlds is unique in providing not only a comprehensive chronological approach to colonial history with attention to thematic details, but a window into the relevant historiography. Each historian also selected several documents to accompany their chapter, found in the companion primary source reader. Converging Worlds: Communities and Cultures in Colonial America includes: timelines tailored for every chapter chapter summaries discussion questions lists of further reading, introducing students to specialist literature fifty illustrations. Key topics discussed include: French, Spanish, and Native American experiences regional areas such as the Midwest and Southwest religion including missions, witchcraft, and Protestants the experience of women and families. With its synthesis of both broad time periods and specific themes, Converging Worlds is ideal for students of the colonial period, and provides a fascinating glimpse into the diverse foundations of America. For additional information and classroom resources please visit the Converging Worlds companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415964999.

Diversity and Accommodation

Author: Michael J. Puglisi
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9780870499692
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
An exciting new book that reveals both the diversity of Virginia's Appalachian culture and that of the scholars working on it. -- Daniel B. Thorp, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityFocusing on the early Virginia frontier, the essays in Diversity and Accommodation stress the importance of cultural pluralism in backcountry society and the need to replace stereotypical images with realistic conclusions based on a detailed case-study approach.The contributors to this collection argue that traditional views -- of ethnic and cultural isolation, of German clannishness and Scots-Irish individualism -- contain a kernel of truth but are far too restrictive and simplistic. While acknowledging that distinct ethnic and cultural groups did exist on the Virginia frontier and that their effect on the development and heritage of the region was significant, these scholars show that accommodation, adaptation, exchange, and coexistence among such groups played a more important part in the cultural dynamics of the area than previous studies have indicated.Drawing on the methods and findings of various disciplines -- including social history, archaeology, ethnic studies, and material culture studies -- the essays encompass key aspects and phases of the Virginia frontier experience. Among the topics covered are the earliest trade relationships between English Virginians and the Native American societies, the impact of immigrants from Ulster and the Rhineland, the African American presence and the nature of slavery in the region, and the development of community ties in southwest Virginia. The final section examines the ways in which backcountry architecture reflected both the earlysettlers' backgrounds as well as their adaptations to their new environment.With their fresh insights and innovative analysis, the essays in Diversity and Accommodation make an important contribution to the growing body of scholarship on the role of the frontier and backcountry regions in American history.

The Way of Improvement Leads Home

Author: John Fea
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812206398
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The Way of Improvement Leads Home traces the short but fascinating life of Philip Vickers Fithian, one of the most prolific diarists in early America. Born to Presbyterian grain-growers in rural New Jersey, he was never quite satisfied with the agricultural life he seemed destined to inherit. Fithian longed for something more—to improve himself in a revolutionary world that was making upward mobility possible. While Fithian is best known for the diary that he wrote in 1773-74 while working as a tutor at Nomini Hall, the Virginia plantation of Robert Carter, this first full biography moves beyond his experience in the Old Dominion to examine his inner life, his experience in the early American backcountry, his love affair with Elizabeth Beatty, and his role as a Revolutionary War chaplain. From the villages of New Jersey, Fithian was able to participate indirectly in the eighteenth-century republic of letters—a transatlantic intellectual community sustained through sociability, print, and the pursuit of mutual improvement. The republic of letters was above all else a rational republic, with little tolerance for those unable to rid themselves of parochial passions. Participation required a commitment to self-improvement that demanded a belief in the Enlightenment values of human potential and social progress. Although Fithian was deeply committed to these values, he constantly struggled to reconcile his quest for a cosmopolitan life with his love of home. As John Fea argues, it was the people, the religious culture, and the very landscape of his "native sod" that continued to hold Fithian's affections and enabled him to live a life worthy of a man of letters.

A Fictive People

Author: Ronald J. Zboray
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 019507582X
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
This text aims to explode two notions that are commonplace in American cultural histories of the 19th century: that the spread of literature was a simple force for the democratization of taste, and that there was a body of 19th-century literature that reflected "a nation of readers."

Economic geography

Author: James O. Wheeler
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Provides readers with a solid background in the theories of economic geography, while examining contemporary issues. Updated edition integrates new recent research on industrial geography using information published within the last ten years with an added global emphasis. Features a new chapter on interdependent global economies and improved figures and graphics, including updated tables throughout the text.