The Bramble Bush

Author: Karl N. Llewellyn
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610271351
Format: PDF, ePub
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Written generations ago, but highly relevant today, The Bramble Bush remains one of the books most recommended for students to read when considering law school, just before beginning its study, or early in the first semester. Its first edition began as a collection from a series of introductory lectures given by legal legend Karl Llewellyn to new law students at Columbia University. It still speaks to law, legal reasoning, and exam-taking skills in a way that makes it a classic for each new generation. The Quid Pro Legal Legends Edition includes an extensive, practical, and modern Introduction by Stewart Macaulay, a senior law professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Macaulay updates the current reader on the book's continued relevance and application, offers a practical perspective to new law students, and places the original edition in its historical context. Simply put, Macaulay writes, this "is a book that anyone interested in law schools or law should read." The Quid Pro Books edition of the classic work also includes several unobtrusive annotations, to update the reader on legal terms and cultural references made in the original that may not be clear to today's reader. Moreover, this is a carefully proofread and presented edition, lacking the errors and scanning mistakes of other presses' editions in print. It is also available in paperback and clothbound formats from Quid Pro, including the annotations and new Introduction by Prof. Macaulay.

Jurisprudence

Author: Karl N. Llewellyn
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412813786
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Jurisprudence: Realism in Theory and Practice compiles many of Llewellyn's most important writings. For his time, the thirties through the fifties, Llewellyn offered fresh approaches to the study of law and society. Although these writings might not seem innovative today, because they have become widely applied in the contemporary world, they remain a testament to his. The ideas he advanced many decades ago have now become commonplace among contemporary jurisprudence scholars as well as social scientists studying law and legal issues. Legal realism, the ground of Llewellyn's theory, attempts to contextualize the practice of law. Its proponents argue that a host of extra-legal factors--social, cultural, historical, and psychological, to name a few--are at least as important in determining legal outcomes as are the rules and principles by which the legal system operates. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., book, The Common Law, is regarded as the founder of legal realism. Holmes stated that in order to truly understand the workings of law, one must go beyond technical (or logical) elements entailing rules and procedures. The life of the law is not only that which is embodied in statutes and court decisions guided by procedural law. Law is just as much about experience: about flesh-and-blood human beings doings things together and making decisions. Llewellyn's version of legal realism was heavily influenced by Pound and Holmes. The distinction between "law in books" and "law in action" is an acknowledgement of the gap that exists between law as embodied in criminal, civil, and administrative code books, and law. A fully formed legal realism insists on studying the behavior of legal practitioners, including their practices, habits, and techniques of action as well as decision-making about others. This classic studyis a foremosthistorical work on legal theory, and is essential for understanding the roots of this influential perspective.

Getting to Maybe

Author: Richard Michael Fischl
Publisher: Carolina Academic Press
ISBN: 161163217X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader’s performance. The book begins by describing the difference between educational cultures that praise students for “right answers,” and the law school culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such perplexing situations. But the authors don’t stop with mere description. Instead, Getting to Maybe teaches how to excel on law school exams by showing the reader how legal analysis can be brought to bear on examination problems. The book contains hints on studying and preparation that go well beyond conventional advice. The authors also illustrate how to argue both sides of a legal issue without appearing wishy-washy or indecisive. Above all, the book explains why exam questions may generate feelings of uncertainty or doubt about correct legal outcomes and how the student can turn these feelings to his or her advantage. In sum, although the authors believe that no exam guide can substitute for a firm grasp of substantive material, readers who devote the necessary time to learning the law will find this book an invaluable guide to translating learning into better exam performance. “This book should revolutionize the ordeal of studying for law school exams… Its clear, insightful, fun to read, and right on the money.” — Duncan Kennedy, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School “Finally a study aid that takes legal theory seriously… Students who master these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they will also learn to be better lawyers.” — Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School “If you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam hypothetical, get this book. If you don’t know how to play 'Czar of the Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do want to learn how to think like a lawyer—a good one—get this book. It's, quite simply, stone cold brilliant.” — Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website) Attend a Getting to Maybe seminar! Click here for more information.

The Cheyenne Way

Author: Karl Nickerson Llewellyn
Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc.
ISBN: 9781575887173
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Cheyenne Indians are one of the most famous tribes of the Great American Plains. While they lived a nomadic, semi-pastoral, hunting existence, the Cheyenne still abided by a clear and well-organized legal and social system. In an effort to examine the way of the Cheyenne more closely, authors Karl N. Llewellyn (a specialist in law) and E. Adamson Hoebel (an anthropologist) decided to perform a field investigation in the summer of 1936. The result of their work was The Cheyenne Way, an illuminating study of the guidance of group conduct without violence in a primitive society having no organized government. It presents 53 cases recorded in the words of Cheyenne informants, ranging from the crime of murder to breaches upon domestic relations. The authors adopted the inductive case-method of American law schools as an exploratory technique to probe Cheyenne jurisprudence. Because the tribe had a non-literate culture, it was necessary to resort to extensive field work to find the case histories recorded only in the memories of tribal storytellers. Prior to delving into the cases, Llewellyn and Hoebel detail the historical background, origin, and development of the Council of Forty-four, the tribal council of civil chiefs that was not only the supreme policy-making body, but which also possessed many judicial functions. After discussing the cases dealing with the Council, the volume explores other elements of the Cheyenne legal system as they related to the military societies, homicide and the supernatural, marriage and sex, property and inheritance, and informal pressures and the integration of the individual. The Cheyenne Way created an abundance of discussion in the legal, academic, and North American Indian communities when it was originally published in 1941, and the relevance of this exceptional work endures for members of these communities today

1l of a Ride

Author: Andrew McClurg
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781634607896
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Assigned as required or recommended reading at law schools throughout the country, 1L of a Ride provides a candid, comprehensive roadmap to both academic and emotional success in law school's crucial first year. Told in an accessible first-person voice, covered topics in the revised and updated third edition include pre-planning, top student fears, first-year curriculum, the Socratic and case methods of teaching, effective class participation, top habits of successful students, essential study techniques, legal research and writing, exam strategies, maintaining well-being, and much more. Combines anecdotes, comments from law students, empirical research, and authentic samples of signature documents from the 1L experience, including exam questions, Socratic dialogue, and student case-briefs, class notes, and course outlines. McClurg is an award-winning professor who has taught at six different law schools.

Natural Law in Court

Author: R. H. Helmholz
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674504615
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Natural-law theory grounds human laws in universal truths of God’s creation. The task of the judicial system was to build an edifice of positive law on natural law’s foundations. R. H. Helmholz shows how lawyers and judges made and interpreted natural law arguments in the West, and concludes that historically it has advanced the cause of justice.

Law in America

Author: Lawrence M. Friedman
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 1588362507
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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“Law in America is a little gem. It is a peerless introduction to our legal history—concise, clear, tellingly told, and beautifully written. The greatest living historian of American law has done it again.” —Stanley N. Katz, former president of the American Society for Legal History and the Organization of American Historians “All societies have laws, but neither all laws nor all legal systems are alike. No one has thought more deeply or written more clearly about the peculiar role of law in American life than Lawrence Friedman. In this trenchant, illuminating book, he distills a lifetime of scholarship and teaching into a concise and provocative explanation of the role that law has played in shaping the distinctive contours of American history and culture.” —David M. Kennedy, professor of history at Stanford University and author of Freedom from Fear Throughout America’s history, our laws have been a reflection of who we are, of what we value, of who has control. They embody our society’s genetic code. In the masterful hands of the subject’s greatest living historian, the story of the evolution of our laws serves to lay bare the deciding struggles over power and justice that have shaped this country from its birth pangs to the present. Law in America is a supreme example of the historian’s art, its brevity a testament to the great elegance and wit of its composition.