The Chickamauga Campaign Barren Victory

Author: David Powell
Publisher: Savas Beatie
ISBN: 1611213290
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Barren Victory is the third and concluding volume of the magisterial Chickamauga Campaign Trilogy, a comprehensive examination more than a decade in the making of one of the most important and complex military operations of the Civil War. The first installment, A Mad Irregular Battle, introduced readers to the major characters of this sweeping drama and carried them from the Union crossing of the Tennessee River in August 1863 up through the bloody but inconclusive combat of the first and second days of the battle (September 18 and 19, 1863). Glory or the Grave, the trilogy’s second volume, focused on September 20—the decisive third day of fighting that included the Confederate breakthrough of the late morning and the desperate Union final stand on Horseshoe Ridge. This installment drew to a close at nightfall. Barren Victory, David Powell’s final installment, examines the immediate aftermath of this great battle with unprecedented clarity and detail. The narrative opens at dawn on Monday, September 21, 1863, with Union commander William S. Rosecrans in Chattanooga and most of the rest of his Federal army in Rossville, Georgia. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg has won the signal victory of his career, but has yet to fully grasp that fact or the fruits of his success. Unfortunately for the South, three grueling days of combat has broken down the Army of Tennessee and made a vigorous pursuit nearly impossible. In addition to carefully examining the decisions made by each army commander and their consequences, Powell sets forth the dreadful costs of the fighting in terms of the human suffering involved. Barren Victory concludes with the most detailed order of battle (including unit strengths and losses) for Chickamauga ever compiled, and a comprehensive bibliography. David Powell’s The Chickamauga Campaign Trilogy is now complete, with the fighting in the hills and valleys of North Georgia finally receiving the extensive treatment it has so long deserved.

The Chickamauga Campaign

Author: Steven E. Woodworth
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809329808
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From mid-August to mid-September 1863, Union major general William S. Rosecrans’s Army of the Cumberland maneuvered from Tennessee to north Georgia in a bid to rout Confederate general Braxton Bragg’s Army of Tennessee and blaze the way for further Union advances. Meanwhile, Confederate reinforcements bolstered the numbers of the Army of Tennessee, and by the time the two armies met at the Battle of Chickamauga, in northern Georgia, the Confederates had gained numerical superiority. Although the Confederacy won its only major victory west of the Appalachians, it failed to achieve the truly decisive results many high-ranking Confederates expected. In The Chickamauga Campaign,Steven E. Woodworth assembles eight thought-provoking new essays from an impressive group of authors to offer new insight into the complex reasons for this substantial, yet ultimately barren, Confederate victory. This broad collection covers every angle of the campaign, from its prelude to its denouement, from the points of view of key players of all ranks on both sides. In addition to analyzing the actions taken by Union leaders Thomas L. Crittenden, Alexander McCook, and James S. Negley, and Confederate commanders Braxton Bragg, Patrick Cleburne, Daniel Harvey Hill, Thomas C. Hindman, James Longstreet, and Alexander P. Stewart, the book probes the campaign’s impact on morale in the North and South, and concludes with an essay on the campaign’s place in Civil War memory. The final essay pays particular attention to Union veteran Henry Van Ness Boynton, the founder and developer of Chickamauga and Chattanooga State Military Park, whose achievements helped shape how the campaign would be remembered. This second volume in the Civil War Campaigns in the Heartland seriesprovides a profound understanding of the campaign’s details as well as its significance to Civil War history. Contributors: John R. Lundberg Alexander Mendoza David Powell Ethan S. Rafuse William G. Robertson Timothy B. Smith Lee White Steven E. Woodworth

Failure in the Saddle

Author: David Powell
Publisher: Savas Beatie
ISBN: 1611210569
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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WINNER, 2010, RICHARD HARWELL AWARD, GIVEN BY THE CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE OF ATLANTA Confederate cavalry has a storied and favorable relationship with the history of the Civil War. Tales of raids and daring exploits create a whiff of lingering romance about the horse soldiers of the Lost Cause. Sometimes, however, romance obscures history. In August 1863 William Rosecrans' Union Army of the Cumberland embarked on a campaign of maneuver to turn Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee out of Chattanooga, one of the most important industrial and logistical centers of the Confederacy. Despite the presence of two Southern cavalry corps (nearly 14,000 horsemen) under legendary commanders Nathan Bedford Forrest and Joe Wheeler, Union troops crossed the Tennessee River unopposed and unseen, slipped through the passes cutting across the knife-ridged mountains, moved into the narrow valleys, and turned Bragg's left flank. Threatened with the loss of the railroad that fed his army, Bragg had no choice but to retreat. He lost Chattanooga without a fight. After two more weeks of maneuvering, skirmishing, and botched attacks Bragg struck back at Chickamauga, where he was once again surprised by the position of the Union army and the manner in which the fighting unfolded. Although the combat ended with a stunning Southern victory, Federal counterblows that November reversed all that had been so dearly purchased. David A. Powell's Failure in the Saddle: Nathan Bedford Forrest, Joseph Wheeler, and the Confederate Cavalry in the Chickamauga Campaign is the first in-depth attempt to determine what role the Confederate cavalry played in both the loss of Chattanooga and the staggering number of miscues that followed up to, through, and beyond Chickamauga. Powell draws upon an array of primary accounts and his intimate knowledge of the battlefield to reach several startling conclusions: Bragg's experienced cavalry generals routinely fed him misleading information, failed to screen important passes and river crossings, allowed petty command politics to routinely influence their decision-making, and on more than one occasion disobeyed specific and repeated orders that may have changed the course of the campaign. Richly detailed and elegantly written, Failure in the Saddle offers new perspectives on the role of the Rebel horsemen in every combat large and small waged during this long and bloody campaign and, by default, a fresh assessment of the generalship of Braxton Bragg. This judiciously reasoned account includes a guided tour of the cavalry operations, several appendices of important information, and original cartography. It is essential reading for students of the Western Theater. About the Author: David A. Powell is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute (Class of 1983) with a BA in history. He has published numerous articles in magazines, more than fifteen historical simulations of various battles, and is the co-author (with David A. Friedrichs) of The Maps of Chickamauga: An Atlas of the Chickamauga Campaign, Including the Tullahoma Operations, June 22-September 23, 1863, a selection of the History and Military book clubs.

Chickamauga and Chattanooga

Author: John Bowers
Publisher: Harper Perennial
ISBN: 9780380725090
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the Autumn of 1863, a pair of remarkable military engagements took place on opposite sides of the Georgia-Tennessee border -- two battles marked by ferocity, genius, courage, astonishing ineptitude, and outrageous fortune that changed the course of the War Between the States. John Bowers, the man who brought one of the Confederacy's most capable and eccentric commanders to life in Stonewall Jackson, now tells the riveting story of two brutal months in the life of a young nation at war with itself. From the opening volleys at Chickamauga Creek to the final, shocking outcome several miles north at Chattanooga, Bowers brilliantly recreates the fire and fury of the decisive battles of America's Civil War. More than a dramatic account of stunning master strokes and fatal missed opportunities, it is also the unforgettable story of real people: Grant, Longstreet, Sherman, the fiery gambler Nathan Bedford Forrest, George H. Thomas, the tormented Union officer despised and disowned by his Virginia family, and the tragic, tenacious General Braxton Bragg, who, through incompetence, miscalculation, and blind folly, almost singlehandedly doomed the Confederate cause. At Chickamauga, the South won a battle. At Chattanooga, they lost the war. In the Autumn of 1863, a pair of remarkable military engagements took place on opposite sides of the Georgia-Tennessee border -- two battles marked by ferocity, genius, courage, astonishing ineptitude, and outrageous fortune that changed the course of the War Between the States. John Bowers, the man who brought one of the Confederacy's most capable and eccentric commanders to life in Stonewall Jackson, now tells the riveting story of two brutal months in the life of a young nation at war with itself. From the opening volleys at Chickamauga Creek to the final, shocking outcome several miles north at Chattanooga, Bowers brilliantly recreates the fire and fury of the decisive battles of America's Civil War. More than a dramatic account of stunning master strokes and fatal missed opportunities, it is also the unforgettable story of real people: Grant, Longstreet, Sherman, the fiery gambler Nathan Bedford Forrest, George H. Thomas, the tormented Union officer despised and disowned by his Virginia family, and the tragic, tenacious General Braxton Bragg, who, through incompetence, miscalculation, and blind folly, almost single-handedly doomed the Confederate cause.

Gateway to the Confederacy

Author: Evan C. Jones
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807155098
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A collection of ten new essays from some of our finest Civil War historians working today, Gateway to the Confederacy offers a reexamination of the campaigns fought to gain possession of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Each essay addresses how Americans have misconstrued the legacy of these struggles and why scholars feel it necessary to reconsider one of the most critical turning points of the American Civil War. The first academic analysis that delineates all three Civil War campaigns fought from 1862 to 1863 for control of Chattanooga -- the trans-portation hub of the Confederacy and gateway to the Deep South -- this book deals not only with military operations but also with the campaigns' origins and consequences. The essays also explore the far-reaching social and political implications of the battles and bring into sharp focus their impact on postwar literature and commemoration. Several chapters revise the traditional portraits of both famous and con-troversial figures including Ambrose Bierce and Nathan Bedford Forrest. Others investigate some of the more salient moments of these cam-paigns such as the circumstances that allowed for the Confederate breakthrough assault at Chickamauga. Gateway to the Confederacy reassesses these pivotal battles, long in need of reappraisal, and breaks new ground as each scholar re-shapes a particular aspect of this momentous part of the Civil War. CONTRIBUTORS Russell S. Bonds Stephen Cushman Caroline E. Janney Evan C. Jones David A. Powell Gerald J. Prokopowicz William Glenn Robertson Wiley Sword Craig L. Symonds

Days of Glory

Author: Larry J. Daniel
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807148199
Format: PDF
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A potent fighting force that changed the course of the Civil War, the Army of the Cumberland was the North's second-most-powerful army, surpassed in size only by the Army of the Potomac. The Cumberland army engaged the enemy across five times more territory with one-third to one-half fewer men than the Army of the Potomac, and yet its achievements in the western theater rivaled those of the larger eastern army. In Days of Glory, Larry J. Daniel brings his analytic and descriptive skills to bear on the Cumberlanders as he explores the dynamics of discord, political infighting, and feeble leadership that stymied the army in achieving its full potential. Making extensive use of thousands of letters and diaries, Daniel creates an epic portrayal of the developing Cumberland army, from untrained volunteers to hardened soldiers united in their hatred of the Confederates.

Battle above the Clouds

Author: David Powell
Publisher: Savas Beatie
ISBN: 1611213789
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In October 1863, the Union Army of the Cumberland was besieged in Chattanooga, all but surrounded by familiar opponents: The Confederate Army of Tennessee. The Federals were surviving by the narrowest of margins, thanks only to a trickle of supplies painstakingly hauled over the sketchiest of mountain roads. Soon even those quarter-rations would not suffice. Disaster was in the offing. Yet those Confederates, once jubilant at having routed the Federals at Chickamauga and driven them back into the apparent trap of Chattanooga’s trenches, found their own circumstances increasingly difficult to bear. In the immediate aftermath of their victory, the South rejoiced; the Confederacy’s own disasters of the previous summer—Vicksburg and Gettysburg—were seemingly reversed. Then came stalemate in front of those same trenches. The Confederates held the high ground, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, but they could not completely seal off Chattanooga from the north. The Union responded. Reinforcements were on the way. A new man arrived to take command: Ulysses S. Grant. Confederate General Braxton Bragg, unwilling to launch a frontal attack on Chattanooga’s defenses, sought victory elsewhere, diverting troops to East Tennessee. Battle above the Clouds by David Powell recounts the first half of the campaign to lift the siege of Chattanooga, including the opening of the “cracker line,” the unusual night battle of Wauhatchie, and one of the most dramatic battles of the entire war: Lookout Mountain.

This Terrible Sound

Author: Peter Cozzens
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252065941
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Renders the furious ebb and flow of the two-day battle, capturing both the evolving strategies of each side and the horrendous experience of the fight. This book draws from hundreds of diaries, letters, memoirs, interviews, official reports, and regimental histories.

Blue Lightning

Author: Richard A. Baumgartner
Publisher:
ISBN:
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With a potent combination of rapid-firing Spencer rifles, aggressive and determined leadership, and unlimited confidence in themselves, the soldiers of Colonel John T. Wilder's mounted Lightning Brigade -- so christened during the summer of 1863 -- solidified a reputation in the savage battle of Chickamauga as one of the Union Army's hardest fighting and most effective combat organizations. His five Indiana and Illinois regiments, along with Eli Lilly's Indiana Battery, confronted troops from five different Confederate brigades during three clays of fighting, and badly bloodied them all. In Blue Lightning, author Richard A. Baumgartner skillfully blends dozens of first-person narratives, including eyewitness accounts from 60 Lightning Brigade officers and enlisted men, with 156 photographs -- many of them never before published -- to vividly depict one major segment of this brigade's proud history during the Civil War.

No Better Place to Die

Author: Peter Cozzens
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252062292
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Uses excerpts from the letters, diaries, and memoirs of the combatants to recreate the Tennessee battle, and assesses its influence on the outcome of the Civil War