The Cold War

Author: Ronald E. Powaski
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199879583
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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For half of the twentieth century, the Cold War gripped the world. International relations everywhere--and domestic policy in scores of nations--pivoted around this central point, the American-Soviet rivalry. Even today, much of the world's diplomacy grapples with chaos created by the Cold War's sudden disappearance. Here indeed is a subject that defies easy understanding. Now comes a definitive account, a startlingly fresh, clear eyed, comprehensive history of our century's longest struggle. In The Cold War, Ronald E. Powaski offers a new perspective on the great rivalry, even as he provides a coherent, concise narrative. He wastes no time in challenging the reader to think of the Cold War in new ways, arguing that the roots of the conflict are centuries old, going back to Czarist Russia and to the very infancy of the American nation. He shows that both Russia and America were expansionist nations with messianic complexes, and the people of both nations believed they possessed a unique mission in history. Except for a brief interval in 1917, Americans perceived the Russian government (whether Czarist or Bolshevik) as despotic; Russians saw the United States as conspiring to prevent it from reaching its place in the sun. U.S. military intervention in Russia's civil war, with the aim of overthrowing Lenin's upstart regime, entrenched Moscow's fears. Soviet American relations, difficult before World War II--when both nations were relatively weak militarily and isolated from world affairs--escalated dramatically after both nations emerged as the world's major military powers. Powaski paints a portrait of the spiraling tensions with stark clarity, as each new development added to the rivalry: the Marshall Plan, the communist coup in Czechoslovakia, the Berlin blockade, the formation of NATO, the first Soviet nuclear test. In this atmosphere, Truman found it easy to believe that the Communist victory in China and the Korean War were products of Soviet expansionism. He and his successors extended their own web of mutual defense treaties, covert actions, and military interventions across the globe--from the Caribbean to the Middle East and, finally to Southeast Asia, where containment famously foundered in the bog of Vietnam. Powaski skillfully highlights the domestic politics, diplomatic maneuvers, and even psychological factors as he untangles the knot that bound the two superpowers together in conflict. From the nuclear arms race, to the impact of U.S. recognition of China on detente, to Brezhnev's inflexible persistence in competing with America everywhere, he casts new light on familiar topics. Always judicious in his assessments, Powaski gives due credit to Reagan and especially Bush in facilitating the Soviet collapse, but also notes that internal economic failure, not outside pressure, proved decisive in the Communist failure. Perhaps most important, he offers a clear eyed assessment of the lasting distortions the struggle wrought upon American institutions, raising questions about whether anyone really won the Cold War. With clarity, fairness, and insight, he offers the definitive account of our century's longest international rivalry.

Natural Enemies

Author: Robert C. Grogin
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739101605
Format: PDF, Docs
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In an attempt to explain the seemingly a priori antagonisms of the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War, Natural Enemies stands apart from previous literature on the topic. Looking at modern European history and the rise of the United States as a super-power, Robert C. Grogin contends that the Cold War eventually arose out of the clash of two ideologically motivated political systems. Grogin helps us see how the conflict between an American, Wilsonian-inspired politics and Soviet Leninist ideology developed into a gulf that was bound to be antagonistic from the start. The various postwar crises and failed attempts at detente frame this struggle, as Grogin charts the geopolitical trajectory of the conflict until its final dissolution. With an eye toward understanding the impact of this period on subsequent world events, Natural Enemies presents an integrated and original interpretation of Cold War history.

The Cold War

Author: David Painter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134742525
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Cold War dominated international relations for forty-five years. It shaped the foreign policies of the United States and the Soviet Union and deeply affected their societies, domestic situations and their government institutions. Hardly any part of the world escaped its influence. David Painter provides a compact and analytical study that examines the origins, course, and end of the Cold War. His overview is global in perspective, with an emphasis on the Third World as well as the contested regions of Asia and Central America, and a strong consideration of economic issues. He includes discussion of: the global distribution of power the arms race the world economy. The Cold War gives a concise, original and interdisciplinary introduction to this international state of affairs, covering the years between 1945 and 1990.

Die Sowjetunion 1917 1991

Author: Manfred Hildermeier
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110398893
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Soviet Union shaped the 20th century like no other nation except the United States. In the 1960s and 70s, it was justifiably viewed as the second world superpower. M. Hildermeier reviews the most important developmental phases, inflection points, and disruptions in Soviet history. An updated research section includes Stalinism, Brezhnev’s "developed socialism," and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union A Very Short Introduction

Author: Stephen Lovell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199238480
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Almost twenty years after the Soviet Union's end, what are we to make of its existence? Was it a heroic experiment, an unmitigated disaster, or a viable if flawed response to the modern world? What was the Soviet Union like? How did it evolve over seven decades? What was the relationship between the regime and the general population? This introduction blends political history with an investigation into the society and culture at the time. The author examines aspects of patriotism, mass culture, political violence, poverty, and ideology; and provides answers to some of the big questions about the Soviet experience.

Russia America and the Cold War 1949 1991

Author: Martin McCauley
Publisher: Pearson Education
ISBN: 9780582784826
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Looks at the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union, including the turning points of the Cold War, the effect of the arms race on the Soviet Union, and what each country learned from the confrontation.

The Cold War A Very Short Introduction

Author: Robert J. McMahon
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191577588
Format: PDF, ePub
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The massive disorder and economic ruin following the Second World War inevitably predetermined the scope and intensity of the Cold War. But why did it last so long? And what impact did it have on the United States, the Soviet Union, Europe, and the Third World? Finally, how did it affect the broader history of the second half of the twentieth century - what were the human and financial costs? This Very Short Introduction provides a clear and stimulating interpretive overview of the Cold War, one that will both invite debate and encourage deeper investigation. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Gorbatschow

Author: William Taubman
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406700454
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Im Ausland verehrt und bewundert als der Mann, der das Tor zu einem neuen Zeitalter aufstieß, gilt er bei seinen Landsleuten als Schwächling und Totengräber des sowjetischen Imperiums: Michail Gorbatschow ist für die einen ein überragender Staatsmann und für die anderen ein Versager. Pulitzerpreisträger William Taubman legt nun die grundlegende Biographie dieser Jahrhundertgestalt vor – akribisch recherchiert, fundiert im Urteil und fesselnd geschrieben. Als Michail Gorbatschow 1985 mit 54 Jahren jüngster Generalsekretär in der Geschichte der KPdSU wurde, war die Sowjetunion eine von zwei Supermächten. Doch nur vier Jahre später hatten Perestroika und Glasnost die Sowjetunion für immer verändert und Gorbatschow mehr Feinde als Freunde. Seine Politik beendete den Kalten Krieg. Doch im Jahr darauf musste er nach einem gescheiterten Putsch – ohne es zu wollen – dem Kollaps jenes Imperiums zuschauen, das er zu retten versucht hatte. William Taubman schildert in seinem Buch, wie ein Bauernjunge vom Lande es bis an die Spitze im Kreml bringt, sich mit Amerikas erzkonservativem Präsidenten Ronald Reagan anfreundet und es der UdSSR und dem Ostblock erlaubt, sich aufzulösen, ohne Zuflucht zur Gewalt zu nehmen. Wer war dieses „Rätsel Gorbatschow“ – ein wahrhaft großer Politiker oder ein Mann, der an seinen eigenen Fehlern scheiterte und an Mächten, gegen die er nicht gewinnen konnte?

The Cold War

Author: Joseph Smith
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631191384
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book provides a concise analysis of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union during the whole period of the Cold War from 1945 to 1991. It explains the rise of the two superpowers immediately after World War II. The author describes the growing confrontation between East and West in Europe dating from the announcement of the Truman Doctrine in 1949 to the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961. Full attention is paid to the extension of the conflict beyond Europe. The analysis covers superpower relations in the 1970s and the developments of the 1980s that led to the end of the Cold War.