The Constitution religion

Author: Robert S. Alley
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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It has been sixty years since the Supreme Court first addressed the subject of "Church and State" under what has come to be known as the incorporation doctrine, interpreting the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution as extending the First Amendment "religion clauses" to state and municipal actions. Edited with a carefully prepared historical introduction that places the First Amendment in the context of eighteenth-century debates over religious freedom, The Constitution and Religion offers a fresh analysis of the amendment's origins. In a collection of fifty recent and historical decisions concerning freedom of religion, Robert S. Alley places readers at the heart of the national debate, presenting the cases without editorial comment. By carefully extracting extended footnoting and citations that, in the full text, tend to separate legal opinions from public interest, Alley has cast the justices' thoughts in a format that captures the drama and, frequently, the eloquence of the prose that is, for now, the law of the land.

Religious Liberty and the American Supreme Court

Author: Vincent Phillip Munoz
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442250321
Format: PDF, ePub
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Throughout American history, legal battles concerning the First Amendment’s protection of religious liberty have been among the most contentious issue of the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution. This book represents the most authoritative and up-to-date overview of the landmark cases that have defined religious freedom in America.

That Godless Court

Author: Ronald Bruce Flowers
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 9780664228910
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The religion clauses of the First Amendment, which seem simple and clear, have been and continue to be controversial in their application. Church-state issues have never been more complex, controversial, and divisive than they are today. In this helpful and instructive book, Ronald B. Flowers explains clearly and concisely the intricacies and implications of Supreme Court decisions in the volatile area of church-state relations. This is an ideal primer for those Americans who have listened to the debates about what the Supreme Court has and has not said about the relationship between church and state, and where the boundaries between the two have been eroded. It is also ideal for use in the classroom, specifically in undergraduate courses in religion and the court, introductions to U.S. constitutional law, constitutional law and politics, and the Supreme Court. The book is also a helpful tool for pastors, clarifying contemporary church-state issues that impact their churches and parishioners directly and indirectly.

Religion and the American Constitutional Experiment

Author: Joel A. Nichols
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190459425
Format: PDF, Docs
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"This new edition of a classic textbook provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary overview of the history, theology, and law of American religious liberty. The authors offer a balanced and accessible analysis of First Amendment cases and controversies, and compare them to both the original teachings of the American founders and current international norms of religious liberty"--

SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE

Author: Philip HAMBURGER
Publisher: 清华大学出版社有限公司
ISBN: 9780674007345
Format: PDF, Docs
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In a powerful challenge to conventional wisdom, Philip Hamburger argues that the separation of church and state has no historical foundation in the First Amendment. The detailed evidence assembled here shows that eighteenth-century Americans almost never invoked this principle. Although Thomas Jefferson and others retrospectively claimed that the First Amendment separated church and state, separation became part of American constitutional law only much later. Hamburger shows that separation became a constitutional freedom largely through fear and prejudice. Jefferson supported separation out of hostility to the Federalist clergy of New England. Nativist Protestants (ranging from nineteenth-century Know Nothings to twentieth-century members of the K.K.K.) adopted the principle of separation to restrict the role of Catholics in public life. Gradually, these Protestants were joined by theologically liberal, anti-Christian secularists, who hoped that separation would limit Christianity and all other distinct religions. Eventually, a wide range of men and women called for separation. Almost all of these Americans feared ecclesiastical authority, particularly that of the Catholic Church, and, in response to their fears, they increasingly perceived religious liberty to require a separation of church from state. American religious liberty was thus redefined and even transformed. In the process, the First Amendment was often used as an instrument of intolerance and discrimination.

Church state Constitutional Issues

Author: Donald L. Drakeman
Publisher: Praeger Pub Text
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume explores the often-debated and always topical issue of the relationship between church and state as outlined in the First Amendment. Drakeman takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the meaning of the establishment clause, demonstrating how the studies of law, religion, history, and political science provide insight into this relationship which, since the nation's inception, has been difficult to define. These viewpoints combine to offer a new interpretation of the establishment clause, marking the work as a valuable tool toward further understanding of this complex issue.

The Establishment Clause

Author: Leonard W. Levy
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146962043X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Leonard Levy's classic work examines the circumstances that led to the writing of the establishment clause of the First Amendment: 'Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion. . . .' He argues that, contrary to popular belief, the framers of the Constitution intended to prohibit government aid to religion even on an impartial basis. He thus refutes the view of 'nonpreferentialists,' who interpret the clause as allowing such aid provided that the assistance is not restricted to a preferred church. For this new edition, Levy has added to his original arguments and incorporated much new material, including an analysis of Jefferson's ideas on the relationship between church and state and a discussion of the establishment clause cases brought before the Supreme Court since the book was originally published in 1986.

Religious Liberty in the Supreme Court

Author: Terry Eastland
Publisher: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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"Twenty-five" cases, decided bewteen 1940 and 1992, including the upholding of a Minnesota law in the 1983 Mueller v. Allen case, are "introduced, excerpted, and annotated", with editorial comment on "fifteen of the cases ... from such sources as the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Christian Century, and The New Republic", as well as "comment on trends in the Court's religion-clause jurisprudence and their implications for our public life" by three legal scholars. Includes index of cases and judges.

Witnessing Their Faith

Author: Jay Alan Sekulow
Publisher: Sheed & Ward
ISBN: 146167543X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When it was ratified in 1791, the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States sought to protect against two distinct types of government actions that interfere with religious liberty: the establishment of a national religion and interference with individual rights to practice religion.

Church State and Original Intent

Author: Donald L. Drakeman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521119189
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This provocative book shows how the justices of the United States Supreme Court have used constitutional history, portraying the Framers' actions in a light favoring their own views about how church and state should be separated. Drakeman examines church-state constitutional controversies from the Founding Era to the present, arguing that the Framers originally intended the establishment clause only as a prohibition against a single national church.