The Creation Evolution Debate

Author: Edward J. Larson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820336541
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Few issues besides evolution have so strained Americans' professed tradition of tolerance. Few historians besides Pulitzer Prize winner Edward J. Larson have so perceptively chronicled evolution's divisive presence on the American scene. This slim volume reviews the key aspects, current and historical, of the creation-evolution debate in the United States. Larson discusses such topics as the transatlantic response to Darwinism, the American controversy over teaching evolution in public schools, and the religious views of American scientists. He recalls the theological qualms about evolution held by some leading scientists of Darwin's time. He looks at the 2006 Dover, Pennsylvania, court decision on teaching Intelligent Design and other cases leading back to the landmark 1925 Scopes trial. Drawing on surveys that Larson conducted, he discusses attitudes of American scientists toward the existence of God and the afterlife. By looking at the changing motivations and backgrounds of the stakeholders in the creation-evolution debate--clergy, scientists, lawmakers, educators, and others--Larson promotes a more nuanced view of the question than most of us have. This is no incidental benefit for Larson's readers; it is one of the book's driving purposes. If we cede the debate to those who would frame it simplistically rather than embrace its complexity, warns Larson, we will not advance beyond the naive regard of organized religion as the enemy of intellectual freedom or the equally myopic myth of the scientist as courageous loner willing to die for the truth.

Evangelicals and Science in Historical Perspective

Author: David N. Livingstone
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195353969
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, evangelicals often took their place among prominent practicing scientists, and their perspectives exerted a considerable impact on the development of modern western science. Over the last century, however, evangelical scientists have become less visible, even as the focus of evangelical engagement has shifted to political and cultural spheres. Evangelicals and Science in Historical Perspective offers the first wide-ranging survey of the history of the encounter between evangelical Protestantism and science. Comprising papers by leading historians of science and religion, this collection shows that the questions of science have been central to the history of evangelicalism in the United States, as well as in Britain and Canada. It will be an invaluable resource for understanding the historical context of contemporary political squabbles, such as the debate over the status of creation science and the teaching of evolution.

Ideas and Movements that Shaped America From the Bill of Rights to Occupy Wall Street 3 volumes

Author: Michael Green
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610692527
Format: PDF, Docs
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America was founded on bold ideas and beliefs. This book examines the ideas and movements that shaped our nation, presenting thorough, accessible entries with sources that improve readers' understanding of the American experience. • Contains more than 200 entries from expert contributors on a wide variety of American ideas and movements, each accompanied by a relevant original document and helpful cross references • Covers ideas and movements across a broad sweep of U.S. history that enable readers to see recurring themes as well as how American thought has evolved • Presents U.S. history through a unique lens that enables students to better comprehend "the mindset of the American people," as opposed to the traditional study of history as a series of important events and people on a fixed timeline

Encyclopedia of Science and Technology Communication

Author: Susanna Hornig Priest
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 145226578X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For a free 30-day online trial to this title, visit www.sagepub.com/freetrial In the academic world, the term "science communication" refers both to a set of professions (such as science journalism and public information work) and to an interdisciplinary scholarly research specialization. Much of this research is aimed at improving our understanding of the best ways to communicate complex information, especially to people who are not scientists. Science communication specialists are concerned with giving people useful information about health, environment, and technology – as well as science itself. In order to do this, we also need to improve our understanding of how people think, form opinions, and process information. Additionally, professional practitioners in science communication are engaged in strategic and ethical decisions every day, such as: How should reporters cover the issue of climate change? Should the views of scientists who do not believe that climate change has been caused by human activity be included alongside the views of those who do, in order to give a "balanced" story, or does this mislead the public into thinking that both of these positions are equally accepted within the scientific community? The Encyclopedia of Science and Technology Communication provides information on the entire range of interrelated issues in this interdisciplinary field in one place, along with clear suggestions on where to begin the search for more. Geared towards undergraduate and graduate students in journalism, communication, mass communication, and media studies, as well as towards working journalists, public information officers, and public relations specialists, this encyclopedia introduces this vast, fascinating field while challenging the reader to question assumptions inherent in communication across disciplinary boundaries. Key Themes Associations and Organizations Audiences, Opinions, and Effects Challenges, Issues, and Controversies Changing Awareness, Opinion, And Behavior Critical Influences and Events Global and International Aspects Government Agencies (US) History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science Important Figures Journal Publications Key Cases and Current Trends Law, Policy, Ethics, and Beliefs Major Infrastructural Initiatives Practices, Strategies, and Tools Professional Roles and Careers Public Engagement Approaches Theory and Research Venues and Channels

Meditations of a Buddhist Skeptic

Author: B. Alan Wallace
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231530323
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A radical approach to studying the mind. Renowned Buddhist philosopher B. Alan Wallace reasserts the power of shamatha and vipashyana, traditional Buddhist meditations, to clarify the mind's role in the natural world. Raising profound questions about human nature, free will, and experience versus dogma, Wallace challenges the claim that consciousness is nothing more than an emergent property of the brain with little relation to universal events. Rather, he maintains that the observer is essential to measuring quantum systems and that mental phenomena (however conceived) influence brain function and behavior. Wallace embarks on a two-part mission: to restore human nature and to transcend it. He begins by explaining the value of skepticism in Buddhism and science and the difficulty of merging their experiential methods of inquiry. Yet Wallace also proves that Buddhist views on human nature and the possibility of free will liberate us from the metaphysical constraints of scientific materialism. He then explores the radical empiricism inspired by William James and applies it to Indian Buddhist philosophy's four schools and the Great Perfection school of Tibetan Buddhism. Since Buddhism begins with the assertion that ignorance lies at the root of all suffering and that the path to freedom is reached through knowledge, Buddhist practice can be viewed as a progression from agnosticism (not knowing) to gnosticism (knowing), acquired through the maintenance of exceptional mental health, mindfulness, and introspection. Wallace discusses these topics in detail, identifying similarities and differences between scientific and Buddhist understanding, and he concludes with an explanation of shamatha and vipashyana and their potential for realizing the full nature, origins, and potential of consciousness.

The Dome of Eden

Author: Stephen H. Webb
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630874221
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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What would biology look like if it took the problem of natural evil seriously? This book argues that biological descriptions of evolution are inherently moral, just as the biblical story of creation has biological implications. A complete account of evolution will therefore require theological input. The Dome of Eden does not try to harmonize evolution and creation. Harmonizers typically begin with Darwinism and then try to add just enough religion to make evolution more palatable, or they begin with Genesis and pry open the creation account just wide enough to let in a little bit of evolution. By contrast, Stephen Webb provides a theory of how evolution and theology fit together, and he argues that this kind of theory is required by the internal demands of both theology and biology. The Dome of Eden also develops a theological account of evolution that is distinct from the intelligent design movement. Webb shows how intelligent design properly discerns the inescapable dimension of purpose in nature but, like Darwinism itself, fails to make sense of the problem of natural evil. Finally, this book draws on the work of Karl Barth to advance a new reading of the Genesis narrative and the theology of Duns Scotus to provide the necessary metaphysical foundation for evolutionary thought.

Br cken bauen Naturwissenschaft und Religion

Author: Ted Peters
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
ISBN: 9783525569757
Format: PDF, Kindle
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English summary: This book collects essays by theologians and scientists, Christian and non-Christian, from around the world to engage in dialogue. German description: Das Projekt Bruckenbauen zwischen Naturwissenschaft und Religion wird immer bedeutender in unserer stark wissenschaftlich orientierten, sich aber religiosen Fragen erneut offnenden Zeit. Die renommierten und international bekannten Beitrager aus Naturwissenschaft, Philosophie und Theologie treten hier in einen kritischen Dialog ein, der die vermeintliche Kluft zwischen Naturwissenschaft und Religion (Buddhismus, Hinduismus, Islam, Judentum, Christentum) zu schlieaen sucht. Neben pragmatischen Betrachtungen spielt dabei das Spannungsfeld zwischen Religion und Ethik und den von Genetik, Neurowissenschaft und Evolutionstheorie gestellten Herausforderungen eine zentrale Rolle.

Der stumme Fr hling

Author: Rachel Carson
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406704220
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Der stumme Frühling erschien erstmals 1962. Der Titel bezieht sich auf das eingangs erzählte Märchen von der blühenden Stadt, in der sich eine seltsame, schleichende Seuche ausbreitet … Das spannend geschriebene Sachbuch wirkte bei seinem Erscheinen wie ein Alarmsignal und avancierte rasch zur Bibel der damals entstehendenÖkologie-Bewegung. ZumerstenMal wurde hier in eindringlichem Appell die Fragwürdigkeit des chemischen Pflanzenschutzes dargelegt. An einer Fülle von Tatsachen machte Rachel Carson seine schädlichen Auswirkungen auf die Natur und die Menschen deutlich. Ihre Warnungen haben seither nichts von ihrer Aktualität verloren.

A Magnificent Catastrophe

Author: Edward J. Larson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416568409
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title "They could write like angels and scheme like demons." So begins Pulitzer Prize-winner Edward Larson's masterful account of the wild ride that was the 1800 presidential election—an election so convulsive and so momentous to the future of American democracy that Thomas Jefferson would later dub it "America's second revolution." This was America's first true presidential campaign, giving birth to our two-party system and indelibly etching the lines of partisanship that have so profoundly shaped American politics ever since. The contest featured two of our most beloved Founding Fathers, once warm friends, facing off as the heads of their two still-forming parties—the hot-tempered but sharp-minded John Adams, and the eloquent yet enigmatic Thomas Jefferson—flanked by the brilliant tacticians Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, who later settled their own differences in a duel. The country was descending into turmoil, reeling from the terrors of the French Revolution, and on the brink of war with France. Blistering accusations flew as our young nation was torn apart along party lines: Adams and his elitist Federalists would squelch liberty and impose a British-style monarchy; Jefferson and his radically democratizing Republicans would throw the country into chaos and debase the role of religion in American life. The stakes could not have been higher. As the competition heated up, other founders joined the fray—James Madison, John Jay, James Monroe, Gouverneur Morris, George Clinton, John Marshall, Horatio Gates, and even George Washington—some of them emerging from retirement to respond to the political crisis gripping the nation and threatening its future. Drawing on unprecedented, meticulous research of the day-to-day unfolding drama, from diaries and letters of the principal players as well as accounts in the fast-evolving partisan press, Larson vividly re-creates the mounting tension as one state after another voted and the press had the lead passing back and forth. The outcome remained shrouded in doubt long after the voting ended, and as Inauguration Day approached, Congress met in closed session to resolve the crisis. In its first great electoral challenge, our fragile experiment in constitutional democracy hung in the balance. A Magnificent Catastrophe is history writing at its evocative best: the riveting story of the last great contest of the founding period.