The Deaf Community in America

Author: Melvia M. Nomeland
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786488549
Format: PDF
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The deaf community in the West has endured radical changes in the past centuries. This work of history tracks the changes both in the education of and the social world of deaf people through the years. Topics include attitudes toward the deaf in Europe and America and the evolution of communication and language. Of particular interest is the way in which deafness has been increasingly humanized, rather than medicalized or pathologized, as it was in the past. Successful contributions to the deaf and non-deaf world by deaf individuals are also highlighted. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

A Place of Their Own

Author: John V. Van Cleve
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9780930323493
Format: PDF, Docs
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Emphasizing the sense of community that deafness fosters, rather than its less positive aspects, this text focuses on the development of the American deaf community during the nineteenth century

The Other Side of Silence

Author: Arden Neisser
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9780930323646
Format: PDF
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Examines the use of sign language by the deaf and discusses the education and social conditions of deaf people in the United States

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, Docs
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Deaf World

Author: Lois Bragg
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814798527
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Argues that deaf Americans consider English secondary to American Sign Language, and have hence developed their own culture of behavior, values, beliefs, and expression within mainstream culture.

Deaf Culture

Author: Irene W. Leigh
Publisher: Plural Publishing
ISBN: 1597569941
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Gaillard in Deaf America a Portrait of the Deaf Community 1917

Author: Henri Gaillard
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563681226
Format: PDF, ePub
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In 1917, Henri Gaillard journeyed to the United States for the centennial celebration of the American School for the Deaf (ASD). The oldest school for deaf students in America, ASD had been confounded by renowned deaf French teacher Laurent Clerc, thus inspiring Gaillard's invitation. Gaillard visited deaf people everywhere he went and recorded his impressions in a detailed journal. His essays present a sharply focused portrait of the many facets of Deaf America during a pivotal year in its history. Gaillard crossed the Atlantic only a few weeks after the United States entered World War I. In his writings, he reports the efforts of American deaf leaders to secure employment for deaf workers to support the war effort. He also witnesses spirited speeches at the National Association of the Deaf convention decrying the replacement of sign language by oral education. Gaillard also depicts the many local institutions established by deaf Americans, such as Philadelphia's All Souls Church, founded in 1888 by the country's first ordained deaf pastor, and the many deaf clubs established by the first wave of deaf college graduates in their communities. His journal stands as a unique chronicle of the American Deaf community during a remarkable era of transition.

The Deaf Way

Author: Bruce N. Snider
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680267
Format: PDF, Docs
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Selected papers from the conference held in Washington DC, July 9-14, 1989.