The Deaf Community in America

Author: Melvia M. Nomeland
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786488549
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The deaf community in the West has endured radical changes in the past centuries. This work of history tracks the changes both in the education of and the social world of deaf people through the years. Topics include attitudes toward the deaf in Europe and America and the evolution of communication and language. Of particular interest is the way in which deafness has been increasingly humanized, rather than medicalized or pathologized, as it was in the past. Successful contributions to the deaf and non-deaf world by deaf individuals are also highlighted. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

A Place of Their Own

Author: John V. Van Cleve
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9780930323493
Format: PDF
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Emphasizing the sense of community that deafness fosters, rather than its less positive aspects, this text focuses on the development of the American deaf community during the nineteenth century

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

The Other Side of Silence

Author: Arden Neisser
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9780930323646
Format: PDF
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Examines the use of sign language by the deaf and discusses the education and social conditions of deaf people in the United States

Signs of Resistance

Author: Susan Burch
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814798942
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Much contemporary political philosophy has been a debate between utilitarianism on the one hand and Kantian, or rights-based ethic has recently faced a growing challenge from a different direction, from a view that argues for a deeper understanding of citizenship and community than the liberal ethic allows. The writings collected in this volume present leading statements of rights-based liberalism and of the communitarian, or civic republican alternatives to that position. The principle of selection has been to shift the focus from the familiar debate between utilitarians and Kantian liberals in order to consider a more powerful challenge ot the rights-based ethic, a challenge indebted, broadly speaking, to Aristotle, Hegel, and the civic republican tradition. Contributors include Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, Alasdair MacIntyre.

Inside Deaf Culture

Author: Carol PADDEN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674041755
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Inside Deaf Culture relates deaf people's search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of deaf people for generations to come. They describe how deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century deaf clubs and deaf theatre, and profile controversial contemporary technologies." Cf. Publisher's description.

Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language

Author: Nora Ellen GROCE
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067450397X
Format: PDF, Docs
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From the seventeenth century to the early years of the twentieth, the population of Martha’s Vineyard manifested an extremely high rate of profound hereditary deafness. In stark contrast to the experience of most deaf people in our own society, the Vineyarders who were born deaf were so thoroughly integrated into the daily life of the community that they were not seen—and did not see themselves—as handicapped or as a group apart. Deaf people were included in all aspects of life, such as town politics, jobs, church affairs, and social life. How was this possible? On the Vineyard, hearing and deaf islanders alike grew up speaking sign language. This unique sociolinguistic adaptation meant that the usual barriers to communication between the hearing and the deaf, which so isolate many deaf people today, did not exist.

Sociolinguistics and Deaf Communities

Author: Adam C. Schembri
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107051940
Format: PDF
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This book provides an up-to-date overview of the main areas of the sociolinguistics of sign languages.