The Fast Runner

Author: Michael Robert Evans
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803228414
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
"The Fast Runner": Filming the Legend of Atanarjuat takes readers behind the cameras, introducing them to the culture, history, traditions, and people that made this movie extraordinary. Michael Robert Evans explores how the epic film, perhaps the most significant text ever produced by indigenous filmmakers, artfully married the latest in video technology with the traditional storytelling of the Inuit. Tracing Atanarjuat from inception through production to reception, Evans shows how the filmmakers managed this complex intercultural "marriage"; how Igloolik Isuma Productions, the world's premier indigenous film company, works; and how Inuit history and culture affected the film's production, release, and worldwide response. His book is a unique, enlightening introduction and analysis of a film that serves as a model of autonomous media production for the more than 350 million indigenous people around the world.

Atanarjuat

Author: Paul Apak Angilirq
Publisher: Coach House Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
A naked man running for his life across the ice, his hair flying ... Paul Apak Angilirq and Zacharias Kunuk grew up hearing the incredible legend of Atanarjuat, The Fast Runner. So, when they became filmmakers, the project they were most eager to tackle was the story of love, murder, revenge and shamanism that had haunted them since childhood. And tackle it they did. Atanarjuat, The Fast Runner, the first feature film scripted in the Inuktitut language and made almost entirely by Inuit filmmakers and actors, has become a legend of its own, even taking the Caméra d'Or prize for best first feature at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival. This book presents the entire screenplay of Atanarjuat in a dual-language edition (in both Inuktitut syllabics and English), and contextualizes it with interviews with the filmmakers, detailed explorations of the legend of Atanarjuat and of the Inuit culture and large full-colour photos with detailed captions throughout. It is, simultaneously, a document of a spectacular film and an incredible culture.

Smoke Signals

Author: Joanna Hearne
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803244622
Format: PDF
Download Now
Smoke Signals is a historical milestone in Native American filmmaking. Released in 1998 and based on a short-story collection by Sherman Alexie, it was the first wide-release feature film written, directed, coproduced, and acted by Native Americans. The most popular Native American film of all time, Smoke Signals is also an innovative work of cinematic storytelling that demands sustained critical attention in its own right. Embedded in Smoke Signals’s universal story of familial loss and renewal are uniquely Indigenous perspectives about political sovereignty, Hollywood’s long history of misrepresentation, and the rise of Indigenous cinema across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Joanna Hearne’s work foregrounds the voices of the filmmakers and performers—in interviews with Alexie and director Chris Eyre, among others—to explore the film’s audiovisual and narrative strategies for speaking to multiple audiences. In particular, Hearne examines the filmmakers’ appropriation of mainstream American popular culture forms to tell a Native story. Focusing in turn on the production and reception of the film and issues of performance, authenticity, social justice, and environmental history within the film’s text and context, this in-depth introduction and analysis expands our understanding and deepens our enjoyment of a Native cinema landmark.

The Layers of Magazine Editing

Author: Michael Robert Evans
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231502788
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Unlike the myriad writing manuals that emphasize grammar, sentence structure, and other skills necessary for entry-level editing jobs, this engaging book adopts a broader view, beginning with the larger topics of audience, mission, and tone, and working its way down, layer by layer, to the smaller questions of grammar and punctuation. Based on Michael Evans's years of experience as an editor and supplemented by invaluable observations from the editors of more than sixty magazines—including The Atlantic, Better Homes and Gardens, Ebony, Esquire, and National Geographic—this book reveals the people-oriented nature of the job.

The Language of the Inuit

Author: Louis-Jacques Dorais
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773581766
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The culmination of forty years of research, The Language of the Inuit maps the geographical distribution and linguistic differences between the Eskaleut and Inuit languages and dialects. Providing details about aspects of comparative phonology, grammar, and lexicon as well as Inuit prehistory and historical evolution, Louis-Jacques Dorais shows the effects of bilingualism, literacy, and formal education on Inuit language and considers its present status and future. An enormous task, masterfully accomplished, The Language of the Inuit is not only an anthropological and linguistic study of a language and the broad social and cultural contexts where it is spoken but a history of the language’s speakers.

Tribal Television

Author: Dustin Tahmahkera
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618680
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Tribal Television: Viewing Native People in Sitcoms

Isuma

Author: Michael Robert Evans
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Since director Zacharias Kunuk was awarded the Camera d'Or Award at Cannes in 2001, Igloolik Isuma Productions has been among the most well-known and influential indigenous film companies in the world. Isuma's premier movie, Atanarjuat (The Fast Runner) - the first-ever feature film produced by the Inuit and presented entirely in the Inuktitut language - has received numerous awards and critical acclaim.

Media Worlds

Author: Faye D. Ginsburg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520928164
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This groundbreaking volume showcases the exciting work emerging from the ethnography of media, a burgeoning new area in anthropology that expands both social theory and ethnographic fieldwork to examine the way media—film, television, video—are used in societies around the globe, often in places that have been off the map of conventional media studies. The contributors, key figures in this new field, cover topics ranging from indigenous media projects around the world to the unexpected effects of state control of media to the local impact of film and television as they travel transnationally. Their essays, mostly new work produced for this volume, bring provocative new theoretical perspectives grounded in cross-cultural ethnographic realities to the study of media.

Lost in the Barrens

Author: Farley Mowat
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart
ISBN: 9781551991856
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Awasin, a Cree Indian boy, and Jamie, a Canadian orphan living with his uncle, the trapper Angus Macnair, are enchanted by the magic of the great Arctic wastes. They set out on an adventure that proves longer and more dangerous than they could have imagined. Drawing on his knowledge of the ways of the wilderness and the implacable northern elements, Farley Mowat has created a memorable tale of daring and adventure. When first published in 1956, Lost in the Barrens won the Governor-General’s Award for Juvenile Literature, the Book-of-the-Year Medal of the Canadian Association of Children’s Librarians and the Boys’ Club of America Junior Book Award.

Navajo Talking Picture

Author: Randolph Lewis
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803240821
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Navajo Talking Picture, released in 1985, is one of the earliest and most controversial works of Native cinema. It is a documentary by Los Angeles filmmaker Arlene Bowman, who travels to the Navajo reservation to record the traditional ways of her grandmother in order to understand her own cultural heritage. For reasons that have often confused viewers, the filmmaker persists despite her traditional grandmother’s forceful objections to the apparent invasion of her privacy. What emerges is a strange and thought-provoking work that abruptly calls into question the issue of insider versus outsider and other assumptions that have obscured the complexities of Native art. Randolph Lewis offers an insightful introduction and analysis of Navajo Talking Picture, in which he shows that it is not simply the first Navajo-produced film but also a path-breaking work in the history of indigenous media in the United States. Placing the film in a number of revealing contexts, including the long history of Navajo people working in Hollywood, the ethics of documentary filmmaking, and the often problematic reception of Native art, Lewis explores the tensions and mysteries hidden in this unsettling but fascinating film.