The First Atomic Age

Author: Matthew Lavine
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137307226
Format: PDF
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At the close of the 19th century, strange new forms of energy arrested the American public's attention in ways that no scientific discovery ever had before. This groundbreaking cultural history tells the story of the first nuclear culture, one whose lasting effects would be seen in the familiar "atomic age" of the post-war twentieth century.

Three Mile Island

Author: Grace Halden
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317419936
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Three Mile Island explains the far-reaching consequences of the partial meltdown of Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island power plant on March 28, 1979. Though the disaster was ultimately contained, the fears it triggered had an immediate and lasting impact on public attitudes towards nuclear energy in the United States. In this volume, Grace Halden contextualizes the events at Three Mile Island and the ensuing media coverage, offering a gripping portrait of a nation coming to terms with technological advances that inspired both awe and terror. Including a selection of key primary documents, this book offers a fascinating resource for students of the history of science, technology, the environment, and Cold War culture.

Inventing Atmospheric Science

Author: James Rodger Fleming
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262033941
Format: PDF
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How scientists used transformative new technologies to understand the complexities of weather and the atmosphere, told through the intertwined careers of three key figures.

A Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Author: Christopher M. Nichols
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118913965
Format: PDF, ePub
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A Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era presents a collection of new historiographic essays covering the years between 1877 and 1920, a period which saw the U.S. emerge from the ashes of Reconstruction to become a world power. The single, definitive resource for the latest state of knowledge relating to the history and historiography of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Features contributions by leading scholars in a wide range of relevant specialties Coverage of the period includes geographic, social, cultural, economic, political, diplomatic, ethnic, racial, gendered, religious, global, and ecological themes and approaches In today’s era, often referred to as a “second Gilded Age,” this book offers relevant historical analysis of the factors that helped create contemporary society Fills an important chronological gap in period-based American history collections

Negro Building

Author: Mabel O. Wilson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520268423
Format: PDF, ePub
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Traces the evolution of black public history from the Civil War to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, giving voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content--Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, A. Philip Randolph, Horace Cayton, and Margaret Burroughs

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

Author: Thomas S. Kuhn
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226458148
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

The Rise of Experimental Biology

Author: Peter L. Lutz
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1592591639
Format: PDF, Docs
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Peter Lutz, PhD, brilliantly traverses the major milestones along the evolutionary path of biomedicine from earliest recorded times to the dawn of the 20th century. With an engaging narrative that will have you turning "just one more page" well into the night, this book revealingly demonstrates just how the modern scientific method has been shaped by the past. Along the way the reader is treated to some delightfully obscure anecdotes and a treasure trove of rich illustrations that chronicle the tortuous history of biomedical developments, ranging from the bizarre and amusing to the downright macabre. The reader will also be introduced to the major ideas shaping contemporary physiology and the social context of its development, and also gain an understanding of how advances in biological science have occasionally been improperly used to satisfy momentary social or political needs.

A Fabulous Kingdom

Author: Charles Officer
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0199837805
Format: PDF, ePub
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The second edition of A Fabulous Kingdom will explain the history of the arctic and describe the current scientific and environmental issues that threaten this fascinating region.

The Poetics of Natural History

Author: Christoph Irmscher
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813526157
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Poetics of Natural History is about the "daydreams" of early American naturalists (from 1730 to 1868) and the collections they created around these dreams. Christoph Irmscher explores how, through the acts of organizing physical artifacts and reflecting upon their collections through writings and images, naturalists from John Bartram to Louis Agassiz were making sense of themselves and their world. These collections allowed them, in a way, to collect themselves. In the first part of his book, Irmscher offers us a guided tour of the actual collections, beginning in Bartram's disorderly botanical garden in Philadelphia and taking us through the artful display of animals in Charles Wilson Peale's collections and, finally, to the "halls of humbug" of P. T. Barnum's American Museum. The second part of the book moves away from the collections, and explores natural history words and images. Irmscher unforgettably describes American collectors' fascination and horror with the American rattlesnake, and invokes the violent and beautiful world of American birds as described in John James Audubon's paintings and writings. His book ends with a description of Louis Agassiz's 1865 expedition to Brazil as seen through the eyes of the young William James, who reluctantly gathered Brazilian fish while his mentor assembled "proof" that some human beings were less human than others.

A Good and Wise Measure

Author: Francis M. Carroll
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802083586
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The story of the attempts to settle the original boundary between British North America and the United States. Though established by the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the boundary was plagued by ambiguities and errors in the document.