The Flat World and Education

Author: Linda Darling-Hammond
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807770627
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Argues that the education system in America needs to make drastic changes in order to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that protects every child's right to learn.

The flat world and education

Author: Linda Darling-Hammond
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780807749623
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawing on her broad experience, Darling-Hammond examines the roots of the U.S. modern education system and shows how the skills required for our 21st-century global economy cannot be learned in traditional education systems, which have been in place since the early 1900s. She identifies an "opportunity gap" that has evolved as new kinds of learning have become necessary - a gap where low-income students, students of colour, and English language learners often do not have the same access as others to qualified teachers, high-quality curriculum, and well-resourced classrooms. After setting the stage on current conditions in the U.S., Darling-Hammond offers a coherent approach for effective reform that focusses on creating successful systems, inducting and supporting quality teachers, designing effecting schools, establishing strong professional practice, and providing equitable and sufficient resources. The Flat World and Educationlays out what the U.S. needs to do in order to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that ensures every child the right to learn.

Education Research in the Public Interest

Author: Gloria Ladson-Billings
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774332
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Acclaimed African American scholar and teacher educator Gloria Ladson-Billings examines the field of teacher education through the accomplishments and contributions of well-known African American teacher educators—Lisa Delpit, Carl Grant, Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, Geneva Gay, Cherry McGee Banks, William Tate, and Joyce King. Using in-depth interviews and storytelling, Ladson-Billings depicts deeply personal portraits of these scholars’ experiences to confront race and racism, not only theoretically, but within their everyday professional lives in “the Big House” of the academy. Ladson-Billings gives these portraits even greater resonance and meaning by pairing these teacher educators with historical figures—such as Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, and Charlotte Forten—whose contributions to the struggle for social justice are a wellspring of hope and courage to all educators, and a tribute to African Americans whose political, scientific, and spiritual efforts made life better for us all. This compelling book is important reading for all educators who want to transform teacher education for the better. “The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education is enthused and excited about Ladson-Billings’s dynamic and provoking scholarship. Its focus on outstanding African American teacher educators is a major contribution to teacher education literature. This cutting-edge research is likely to prompt some of the best of unconventional teacher education thought.” —David G. Imig, President and CEO, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education “In this moving and original book, Gloria Ladson-Billings offers complex insights about the politics of scholarship, the experiences of scholars of color in universities, and the larger enterprise of teaching and teacher education for social justice.” —Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Lynch School of Education, Boston College and President of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) for 2004–05.

Integration Interrupted

Author: Karolyn Tyson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199793018
Format: PDF, ePub
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An all-too-popular explanation for why black students aren't doing better in school is their own use of the "acting white" slur to ridicule fellow blacks for taking advanced classes, doing schoolwork, and striving to earn high grades. Carefully reconsidering how and why black students have come to equate school success with whiteness, Integration Interrupted argues that when students understand race to be connected with achievement, it is a powerful lesson conveyed by schools, not their peers. Drawing on over ten years of ethnographic research, Karolyn Tyson shows how equating school success with "acting white" arose in the aftermath of Brown v. Board of Education through the practice of curriculum tracking, which separates students for instruction, ostensibly by ability and prior achievement. Only in very specific circumstances, when black students are drastically underrepresented in advanced and gifted classes, do anxieties about "the burden of acting white" emerge. Racialized tracking continues to define the typical American secondary school, but it goes unremarked, except by the young people who experience its costs and consequences daily. The rich narratives in Integration Interrupted throw light on the complex relationships underlying school behaviors and convincingly demonstrate that the problem lies not with students, but instead with how we organize our schools.

Excellence for All

Author: Jack Schneider
Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press
ISBN: 0826518109
Format: PDF, Mobi
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By the early twenty-first century, a startling consensus had emerged about the overall aim of American school reform. In an era of political discord, and in a field historically known for contentiousness, the notion of promoting educational excellence for all students was a distinct point of bipartisan agreement. Shaped by a corps of entrepreneurial reformers intent on finding "what works" and taking it to scale, this hybrid vision won over the nation's most ambitious and well-resourced policy leaders at foundations and nonprofits, in state and federal government, and in urban school districts from coast to coast. "Excellence for all" might, at first glance, appear to be nothing more than a rhetorical flourish. Who, after all, would oppose the idea of a great education for every student? Yet it is hardly a throwaway phrase. Rather, it represents a surprising fusion of educational policy approaches that had been in tense opposition throughout the twentieth century--those on the right favoring social efficiency, and those on the left supporting social justice. This book seeks to understand why the "excellence for all" vision took hold at the time it did, unpacks the particular beliefs and assumptions embedded in it, and details the often informal coalition building that produced this period of consensus. Examining the nation's largest urban school districts (Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York), the author details three major reform efforts in chapters titled "The Right Space: The Small Schools Movement"; "The Right Teachers: Teach for America"; and "The Right Curriculum: Expanding Advanced Placement."

Global Migration Diversity and Civic Education

Author: James A. Banks
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807775215
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Mass migration and globalization are creating new and deep challenges to education systems the world over. In this volume, some of the world’s leading researchers in multicultural education and immigration discuss critical issues related to cultural sustainability, structural inclusion, and social cohesion. The authors consider how global migration is forcing nation-states to reexamine and reinvent the ways in which they socialize and educate diverse groups for citizenship and civic engagement. These chapters also address how schools can help migrant and immigrant groups attain the knowledge, values, and skills required to become fully participating citizens, while retaining important aspects of their home, community, languages, and culture. Case studies from the United States and Israel are used to illustrate how these concepts are manifested in two immigrant nations. Contributors: Tali Aderet-German, Ayman K. Agbaria, James A. Banks, Zvi Bekerman, Miriam Ben-Peretz, Amy K. Marks, Minas Michikyan, John P. Myers, Sonia Nieto, Carola Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, Guadalupe Valdés, and Gregory White “An invaluable guide to understanding the multiple complexities and challenges involved in designing a transformative multicultural civic education.” —Robert F. Arnove, Indiana University, Bloomington “This impressive volume offers valuable insights to teachers, teacher educators, and researchers concerned with preparing youth to be participating democratic citizens.” —Carole L. Hahn, Emory University “This important book outlines a set of urgent issues for both scholars and practitioners committed to the fuller expression worldwide of education for democracy.” —Margaret Crocco,Michigan State University “A stellar group of scholars integrates the migration question into issues related to teaching and learning, as well as teacher preparation.” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin–Madison “This visionary book highlights research, theory, and practices that can be used to help all students become effective and engaged citizens.” —Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford University and President of the Learning Policy Institute

Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education

Author: James A. Banks
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412981522
Format: PDF, Kindle
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With 695 signed entries with cross-references and recommended readings, the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education, Four-Volume Set, in both print and electronic formats, presents research and statistics, case studies and best practices, policies and programs at pre- and post-secondary levels.

Teaching for Equity in Complex Times

Author: Jamy Stillman
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774901
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In schools serving high concentrations of bilingual learners, it can be especially challenging for teachers to maintain commitments to equity-minded instruction while meeting the demands of new educational policies, including national standards. This book details how one school integrated equity pedagogy into a standards-based curriculum and produced exemplary levels of achievement. As the authors illustrate, however, the school’s dual commitment to bilingual education and standards-based reform engendered numerous complex tensions. Specifically, the authors describe teachers’ attempts to balance demands for rigor and content coverage within their high-performing school and with their diverse student population. They identify specific tensions that emerged around the following issues: the degree of academic struggle that is generative for student learning and the point at which such struggle becomes counterproductivethe holding of high expectations for all learners and the provision of differentiated, student-centered learning experiencesthe CCSS emphasis on engaging students around more complex text and the contested determination of what constitutes complexity in text and in teachingthe influence of high-stakes accountability on school norms and practices, including teachers’ interpretations and enactment of new national standardsthe performance pressures placed on teachers in today’s educational policy context "This book offers welcome guidance on dialogical teaching to socially committed teachers and teacher educators." —Linda Valli, University of Maryland A must-read for those interested in transformative teacher learning." —Kris D. Gutiérrez, Carol Liu Professor, GSE, University of California, Berkeley