The Hohokam millennium

Author: Suzanne K. Fish
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For a thousand years they flourished in the arid lands now part of Arizona. They built extensive waterworks, ballcourts, and pyramids, made beautiful pottery and jewelry, and engaged in wide-ranging trade networks. Then, slowly, their civilization faded and trans-muted into something no longer Hohokam. Are today's Tohono O'odham their heirs or their conquerors? The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and pyramids they built, and much more.

Mimbres lives and landscapes

Author: Margaret Cecile Nelson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691243
Format: PDF, ePub
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The well-illustrated essays in this book offer the latest archaeological research on the ancient Mimbres to explain what we know and what questions still remain about men and women's lives, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of the dramatic pottery designs.

Ancient Puebloan Southwest

Author: John Kantner
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521788809
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Ancient Puebloan Southwest traces the evolution of Puebloan society in the American Southwest from the emergence of the Chaco and Mimbres traditions in the AD 1000s through the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the sixteenth century. The 2004 book focuses on the social and political changes that shaped Puebloan people over the centuries, emphasizing how factors internal to society impacted on cultural evolution, even in the face of the challenging environment that characterizes the American Southwest. The underlying argument is that while the physical environment both provides opportunities and sets limitations to social and political change, even more important evolutionary forces are the tensions between co-operation and competition for status and leadership. Although relying primarily on archaeological data, the book also includes oral histories, historical accounts, and ethnographic records as it introduces readers to the deep history of the Puebloan Southwest.

Hisat sinom

Author: Christian Eric Downum
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691120
Format: PDF, Docs
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When the Spanish conquistadors first came to northern Arizona, they proclaimed it the "sierra sin agua," mountains without water, because of the peculiar absence of rivers and streams. But this harsh, beautiful land below the snow-capped San Francisco Peaks has long nourished humans, including the ancestors of today's Hopis, the Hisatsinom. Showcasing new research from Wupatki, Sunset Crater, and Walnut Canyon, this book tells the story of the diverse, mobile, and adaptive peoples who inhabited this region and borrowed from their Ancestral Pueblo and Hohokam neighbors while maintaining distinctive styles of their own.

Aztec Salmon and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan

Author: Paul F. Reed
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
ISBN: 0826359930
Format: PDF
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Often overshadowed by the Ancestral Pueblo centers at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, the Middle San Juan is one of the most dynamic territories in the pre-Hispanic Southwest, interacting with Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde as well as the surrounding regions. This ancient Puebloan heartland was instrumental in tying together Chaco and Mesa Verde cultures to create a distinctive blend of old and new, local and nonlocal. The contributors to this book attribute the development of Salmon and Aztec to migration and colonization by people from Chaco Canyon. Rather than fighting for control over the territory, Chaco migrants and local leaders worked together to build the great houses of Aztec and Salmon while maintaining their identities and connections with their individual homelands. As a result of this collaboration, the Middle San Juan can be seen as one of the ancient Puebloan heartlands that made important contributions to contemporary Puebloan society.

The peopling of Bandelier

Author: Robert P. Powers
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Few visitors to the stunning Frijoles Canyon at Bandelier National Monument realize that its depths embrace but a small part of the archaeological richness of the vast Pajarito Plateau west of Santa Fe, New Mexico. In this beautifully illustrated book, archaeologists, historians, ecologists, and Pueblo contributors tell a deep and sweeping story of the region. Beginning with its first Paleo-Indian residents, through its Ancestral Pueblo florescence in the 14th and 15th centuries, to its role in the birth of American archaeology and the nuclear age, and concluding with its enduring centrality in the lives of Keresan and Tewa Indian peoples today, the plateau remains a place where the mysterious interplay of human culture and magnificent landscapes is written in its mesas and canyons. A must read for anyone interested in Southwestern archaeology and Native peoples.

Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest

Author: Stephen Plog
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780500286937
Format: PDF, ePub
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Documents some of the most relevant moments of America's prehistoric past as reflected by its ancient Southwest cultures, offering insight into the lesser-known sophistication of such people as the Anasazi, the Hohokam, and the Mogollon. Original.

Archaeology of the Southwest

Author: Linda S. Cordell
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781598746754
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The long awaited third edition of this well-known textbook continues to be the go-to text and reference for anyone interested in Southwestern archaeology, including the latest in current research, debates, and topical syntheses as well as increased coverage of Paleoindian and Archaic periods and the Casas Grandes phenomenon.

A History of the Ancient Southwest

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."

An Archaeology of Doings

Author: Severin M. Fowles
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691564
Format: PDF, ePub
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"There is an unsettling paradox in the anthropology of religion. Modern understandings of "religion" emerged out of a specifically Western genealogy, and recognizing this, many anthropologists have become deeply suspicious of claims that such understandings can be applied with fidelity to premodern or non-Western contexts. And yet, archaeologists now write about "religion" and "ritual" with greater ease than ever, even though their deeply premodern and fully non-Western objects of study would seem to make the use of these concepts especially fraught. In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos--prior to missionization--did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as "doings." Fowles then outlines a new archaeology of doings that takes us far beyond the familiar terrain of premodern religion."--Publisher's website.