The Hollywood propaganda of World War II

Author: Robert Fyne
Publisher: Scarecrow Pr
ISBN: 9780810833104
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An in-depth study that examines WWII movies, analyzing many motifs, stereotypes, ficiton-as-fact, distortions, and prevarications that permeate this genre.

Hollywood Enlists

Author: Ralph Donald
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442277270
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book explores how the Hollywood studios used sophisticated strategies of propaganda to ideologically unite the country during WWII. Through such films as Casablanca, They Were Expendable, and others, the studios appealed to the public’s sense of nationalism, demonized the enemy, and stressed that wartime sacrifices would result in triumph.

Hollywood Goes to War

Author: Clayton R. Koppes
Publisher: Tauris Parke Paperbacks
ISBN: 9781860646058
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The drama, imagery and fantasy of 1940s films was enlisted to inspire the US war effort during World War II. This book looks at the propaganda, politics and persuasion that conspired to produce memorable movies such as Casablanca, and the thankfully forgotten Hillbilly Blitzkreig.

We ll Always Have the Movies

Author: Robert McLaughlin
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813171377
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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We’ll Always Have the Movies explores how movies made in Hollywood during World War II were vehicles for helping Americans understand the war. Far from being simplistic, flag-waving propaganda designed to evoke emotional reactions, these films offered audiences narrative structures that formed a foundation for grasping the nuances of war. These films asked audiences to consider the implications of the Nazi threat, they put a face on both our enemies and allies, and they explored changing wartime gender roles. We’ll Always Have the Movies reveals how film after film repeated the narratives, character types, and rhetoric that made the war and each American’s role in it comprehensible. Robert L. McLaughlin and Sally E. Parry have screened more than 600 movies made between 1937 and 1946—including many never before discussed in this context—and have analyzed the cultural and historical importance of these films in explaining the war to moviegoers. Pre-Pearl Harbor films such as Sergeant York, Foreign Correspondent, and The Great Dictator established the rationale for the war in Europe. After the United States entered the war, films such as Air Force, So Proudly We Hail! and Back to Bataan conveyed reasons for U.S. involvement in the Pacific. The Hitler Gang, Sahara, and Bataan defined our enemies; and Mrs. Miniver, Mission to Moscow, and Dragon Seed defined our allies. Some movies—The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek, Hail the Conquering Hero, and Lifeboat among them—explored homefront anxieties about the war’s effects on American society. Of the many films that sought to explain the politics behind and the social impact of the war—and why it concerned Americans—Casablanca is perhaps one of the most widely recognized. McLaughlin and Parry argue that Rick’s Café Américain serves as a United Nations, sheltering characters who represent countries being oppressed by Germany. At Rick’s, these characters learn that they share a common love of freedom, which is embodied in patriotism; from this commonality, they overcome their differences and work together to solve a conflict that affects them all. As the representative American, Rick Blain (Humphrey Bogart) cannot idly stand by in the face of injustice, and he ultimately sides with those being oppressed. Bogart’s character is a metaphor for America, which could also come out of its isolationism to be a true world leader and unite with its allies to defeat a common enemy. Collectively, Hollywood’s war-era films created a mythic history of the war that, even today, has more currency than the actual events of World War II.

Radio Goes to War

Author: Gerd Horten
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520240618
Format: PDF, Docs
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"By focusing on the medium of radio during World War II, Horten has provided us with a window into an important change in radio broadcasting that has previously been ignored by historians. The depth of research, the book's contribution to our understanding of radio and the war make Radio Goes to War an outstanding work."—Lary May, author of The Big Tomorrow: Hollywood and the Politics of the American Way "Radio broadcasting, and its impact on American life, still remains a neglected area of our national history. Radio Goes to War demonstrates conclusively how short-sighted that omission is. As we enter what is sure to be another era of contested claims of government control over freedom of speech, the controversies and compromises of wartime broadcasting sixty years ago provide an ominous example of difficult decisions to be made in the future. The alliance of big business, advertising, and wartime propaganda that Horten so convincingly illuminates takes on a heightened significance, especially as this relationship has tightened in the last several decades. When radio and television go to war again, will they follow the same course? This is cautionary reading for our new century."—Michele Hilmes, author of Radio Voices: American Broadcasting 1922-1952

Making Movies Black

Author: Thomas Cripps
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195360349
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This is the second volume of Thomas Cripps's definitive history of African-Americans in Hollywood. It covers the period from World War II through the civil rights movement of the 1960s, examining this period through the prism of popular culture. Making Movies Black shows how movies anticipated and helped form America's changing ideas about race. Cripps contends that from the liberal rhetoric of the war years--marked as it was by the propaganda catchwords brotherhood and tolerance--came movies that defined a new African-American presence both in film and in American society at large. He argues that the war years, more than any previous era, gave African-American activists access to centers of cultural influence and power in both Washington and Hollywood. Among the results were an expanded black imagery on the screen during the war--in combat movies such as Bataan, Crash Dive, and Sahara; musicals such as Stormy Weather and Cabin in the Sky; and government propaganda films such as The Negro Soldier and Wings for this Man (narrated by Ronald Reagan!). After the war, the ideologies of both black activism and integrationism persisted, resulting in the 'message movie' era of Pinky, Home of the Brave, and No Way Out, a form of racial politics that anticipated the goals of the Civil Rights Movement. Delving into previously inaccessible records of major Hollywood studios, among them Warner Bros., RKO, and 20th Century-Fox, as well as records of the Office of War Information in the National Archives, and records of the NAACP, and interviews with survivors of the era, Cripps reveals the struggle of both lesser known black filmmakers like Carlton Moss and major figures such as Sidney Poitier. More than a narrative history, Making Movies Black reaches beyond the screen itself with sixty photographs, many never before published, which illustrate the mood of the time. Revealing the social impact of the classical Hollywood film, Making Movies Black is the perfect book for those interested in the changing racial climate in post-World War II American life.

Long Ago and Far Away

Author: Robert Fyne
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 0810866846
Format: PDF, Docs
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After scrutinizing hundreds of screenplays, Robert Fyne has written an in-depth study of World War II films, analyzing the different storylines, points-of-view, and contemporary events found in each. In Long Ago and Far Away: Hollywood and the Second World War, Fyne examines WWII films from 1941 to the present, explaining how the content and mood in these productions paralleled national mores and politics. From Above and Beyond to Zone Troopers and The Best Years of Our Lives to Flags of Our Fathers, this is a compelling look at how filmmakers have dramatized this pivotal period in history. For historians, movie watchers, or social commentators, Long Ago and Far Away, complete with an elaborate filmography, offers new information about Hollywood's diverse interpretations of the Good War.

Projections of War

Author: Thomas Doherty
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231116350
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this lively cultural history, Doherty demonstrates that wartime Hollywood was not a rigidly controlled propaganda machine, as is often assumed, but an ad-hoc collaborative effort between the government and film industry.