The Legal Epic

Author: Alison A. Chapman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022643527X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The seventeenth century saw some of the most important jurisprudential changes in England’s history, yet the period has been largely overlooked in the rich field of literature and law. Helping to fill this gap, The Legal Epic is the first book to situate the great poet and polemicist John Milton at the center of late seventeenth-century legal history. Alison A. Chapman argues that Milton’s Paradise Lost sits at the apex of the early modern period’s long fascination with law and judicial processes. Milton’s world saw law and religion as linked disciplines and thought therefore that in different ways, both law and religion should reflect the will of God. Throughout Paradise Lost, Milton invites his readers to judge actions using not only reason and conscience but also core principles of early modern jurisprudence. Law thus informs Milton’s attempt to “justify the ways of God to men” and points readers toward the types of legal justice that should prevail on earth. Adding to the growing interest in the cultural history of law, The Legal Epic shows that England’s preeminent epic poem is also a sustained reflection on the role law plays in human society.

National Reckonings

Author: Ryan Hackenbracht
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501731084
Format: PDF, Kindle
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During the tumultuous years of the English Revolution and Restoration, national crises like civil wars and the execution of the king convinced Englishmen that the end of the world was not only inevitable but imminent. National Reckonings shows how this widespread eschatological expectation shaped nationalist thinking in the seventeenth century. Imagining what Christ's return would mean for England's body politic, a wide range of poets, philosophers, and other writers—including Milton, Hobbes, Winstanley, and Thomas and Henry Vaughan,—used anticipation of the Last Judgment to both disrupt existing ideas of the nation and generate new ones. Ryan Hackenbracht contends that nationalism, consequently, was not merely a horizontal relationship between citizens and their sovereign but a vertical one that pitted the nation against the shortly expected kingdom of God. The Last Judgment was the site at which these two imagined communities, England and ecclesia (the universal church), would collide. Harnessing the imaginative space afforded by literature, writers measured the shortcomings of an imperfect and finite nation against the divine standard of a perfect and universal community. In writing the nation into end-times prophecies, such works as Paradise Lost and Leviathan offered contemporary readers an opportunity to participate in the cosmic drama of the world's end and experience reckoning while there was still time to alter its outcome.

Literature and the Law of Nations 1580 1680

Author: Christopher N. Warren
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198719345
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 is a literary history of international law, which seeks to revise the ways scholars understand early modern English literature in relation to the history of international law.

The Complete Literary Guide to the Bible

Author: Leland Ryken
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 0310877423
Format: PDF, ePub
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The EditorsLeland Ryken Wheaton College (Illinois) Tremper Longman III Westminster Theological Seminary The Authors Fredrick Buechner Novelist John Sailhamer Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Wilson G. Baroody (deceased) Arizona State UniversityWilliam F. Gentrup Arizona State UniversityKenneth R.R. Gros Louis Indiana University Willard Van Antwerpen Indiana University Nancy Tischler The Pennsylvania State University V. Philips Long Covenant Theological Seminary Michael Hagan North American Baptist Seminary Richard L. Pratt, Jr. Reformed Theological Seminary Douglas Green Yale University Wilma McClarty Southern College Jerry A. Gladson First Christian Church, Garden Grove, California Raymond C. Van Leeouwen Calvin Theological Seminary G. Lloyd Carr Gordon College Richard Patterson Liberty University James H. Sims The University of Southern Mississippi Branson L. Woodard, Jr. Liberty University Amberys R. Whittle Georgia Southern University John H. Augustine Yale University Michael Travers Grand Rapids Baptist College Marianne Meye Thompson Fuller Theological Seminary John W. Sider Westmont College Carey C. Newman Palm Beach Atlantic CollegeWilliam G. Doty The University of Alabama/Tuscaloosa Chaim Potak Novelist Gene Warren Doty University of Missouri-Rolla Sidney Greidanus Calvin Theological Seminary

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit

Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 364110498X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.

Rethinking the Turn to Religion in Early Modern English Literature

Author: Gregory Kneidel
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9780230573680
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Offering new readings of major eary modern English poets such as Spenser, Milton and Donne, Kneidel counters the trend among literary critics to associate early modern religion with Pauline inwardness and self-formation by showing how these writers took Saint Paul as a model of rhetorical skill and political acumen.