The Legal Epic

Author: Alison A. Chapman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022643527X
Format: PDF, ePub
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The seventeenth century saw some of the most important jurisprudential changes in England’s history, yet the period has been largely overlooked in the rich field of literature and law. Helping to fill this gap, The Legal Epic is the first book to situate the great poet and polemicist John Milton at the center of late seventeenth-century legal history. Alison A. Chapman argues that Milton’s Paradise Lost sits at the apex of the early modern period’s long fascination with law and judicial processes. Milton’s world saw law and religion as linked disciplines and thought therefore that in different ways, both law and religion should reflect the will of God. Throughout Paradise Lost, Milton invites his readers to judge actions using not only reason and conscience but also core principles of early modern jurisprudence. Law thus informs Milton’s attempt to “justify the ways of God to men” and points readers toward the types of legal justice that should prevail on earth. Adding to the growing interest in the cultural history of law, The Legal Epic shows that England’s preeminent epic poem is also a sustained reflection on the role law plays in human society.

Milton s Angels

Author: Joad Raymond
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199560501
Format: PDF
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Milton's Angels is a study of writing - theological, scientific, political, and poetic - about angels in 16th-century and 17th-century Britain. It demonstrates that angels were integral to the Protestant imagination and argues that Paradise Lost is a poem about angels that is both shockingly literal and sublimely imaginative.

Literature and the Law of Nations 1580 1680

Author: Christopher N. Warren
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198719345
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 is a literary history of international law, which seeks to revise the ways scholars understand early modern English literature in relation to the history of international law.

Milton and the Making of Paradise Lost

Author: William Poole
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674983203
Format: PDF, Kindle
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William Poole recounts Milton's life as England’s self-elected national poet and explains how the greatest poem of the English language came to be written. How did a blind man compose this staggeringly complex, intensely visual work? Poole explores how Milton’s life and preoccupations inform the poem itself—its structure, content, and meaning.

Spenser Milton and the Redemption of the Epic Hero

Author: Christopher Bond
Publisher: University of Delaware
ISBN: 1611490677
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book studies the interplay of theology and poetics in the three great epics of early modern England, the Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and Paradise Regained. Bond examines how Spenser and Milton adapted the pattern of dual heroism developed in classical and Medieval works. Challenging the opposition between 'Calvinist,' 'allegorical' Spenser and 'Arminian,' 'dramatic' Milton, this book offers a new understanding of their doctrinal and literary affinities within the European epic tradition.

The Reformation of the Subject

Author: Linda Gregerson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521462778
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Faerie Queene and Paradise Lost, as defining monuments of English epic in an iconoclastic age.

Music at Midnight

Author: John Drury
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022613458X
Format: PDF
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Though he never published any of his English poems during his lifetime, George Herbert (1593–1633) is recognized as possibly the greatest religious poet in the language. Few English poets of his age still inspire such intense devotion today. In this richly perceptive biography, John Drury for the first time integrates Herbert’s poems fully into his life, enriching our understanding of both the poet’s mind and his work. As Drury writes in his preface, Herbert lived “a quiet life with a crisis in the middle of it.” Drury follows Herbert from his academic success as a young man, seemingly destined for a career at court, through his abandonment of those hopes, his devotion to the restoration of a church in Huntingdonshire, and his final years as a country parson. Because Herbert’s work was only published posthumously, it has always been difficult to know when or in what context Herbert wrote his poems. But Drury skillfully places readings of the poems into his narrative at biographically credible moments, allowing us to appreciate not only Herbert’s frame of mind while writing, but also the society that produced it. A sensitive critic of Herbert’s poems as well as a theologian, Drury does full justice to the spiritual dimension of Herbert’s work. In addition, he reveals the occasions of sorrow, happiness, regret, and hope that Herbert captured in his poetry and that led T. S. Eliot to write, “What we can confidently believe is that every poem . . . is true to the poet’s experience.” Painting a picture of a man torn between worldly ambition and spiritual life, Music at Midnight is an eloquent biography that breathes new life into some of the greatest English poems ever written.

Oscar Wilde and Classical Antiquity

Author: Alastair J. L. Blanshard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198789262
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Celebrated now and during his lifetime as a wit and aesthete, Oscar Wilde was also a talented classical scholar whose writings evince an enduring fascination with Graeco-Roman antiquity. Covering all the major genres of his literary output, from philosophical and critical writings to society plays, this volume explores the profound impact that ancient literature and thought had on his life and work and offers new perspectives on his most celebrated and canonicaltexts as well as close analyses of unpublished material.

A Preface to Paradise Lost

Author: C.S. Lewis
Publisher: Atlantic Publishers & Dist
ISBN: 9788126904563
Format: PDF, Docs
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Since Its Publication In 1942, C.S. Lewis S A Preface To Paradise Lost Has Remained And Continues To Remain An Indispensable Introductory Book For The Study Of Paradise Lost. Very Briefly, But With Remarkable Clarity And Precision, Lewis Touches On All The Important Aspects Of Paradise Lost: Form And Technique, Structure And Texture, Theological Disputes And Characterization Etc. Lewis Believes That A Poem Is A Public Activity Through Which The Poet Intends To Move His Readers. It Is, Therefore, Extremely Important To Know The Intention Of The Poet, To Know What The Poem Is, What It Was Intended To Do And How It Is Meant To Be Used. Accordingly, Lewis Tries To Identify The Originally Intended Meaning Of The Poem In Order To Help The Reader To Have An Access To Milton S Intentions. In The Process, The Elizabethan World Order, The Contemporary Theological Issues, The Differences Between De Doctrina And Paradise Lost, Critical Opinions On Milton S Style, Diction And Characterizations Particularly Satan, Eve, The Angels And Satan S Followers , Are All Brought To Bear On His Discussions In The Preface. The Book Is A Must For Any Student Of Paradise Lost.

Etymology and the Invention of English in Early Modern Literature

Author: Hannah Crawforth
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107471338
Format: PDF
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How did authors such as Jonson, Spenser, Donne and Milton think about the past lives of the words they used? Hannah Crawforth shows how early modern writers were acutely attuned to the religious and political implications of the etymology of English words. She argues that these lexically astute writers actively engaged with the lexicographers, Anglo-Saxonists and etymologists who were carrying out a national project to recover, or invent, the origins of English, at a time when the question of a national vernacular was inseparable from that of national identity. English words are deployed to particular effect – as a polemical weapon, allegorical device, coded form of communication, type of historical allusion or political tool. Drawing together early modern literature and linguistics, Crawforth argues that the history of English as it was studied in the period radically underpins the writing of its greatest poets.