The Letters of John and Abigail Adams

Author: John Adams
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1625584423
Format: PDF
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Adams is remembered for the many letters she wrote to her husband while he stayed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the Continental Congresses. John frequently sought the advice of Abigail on many matters, and their letters are filled with intellectual discussions on government and politics. The letters serve as eyewitness accounts of the American Revolutionary War home front.

John Abigail Adams

Author: Judith St. George
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780439404723
Format: PDF
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Explores the unique partnership of American statesman John Adams and his wife Abigail, using excerpts from the couples letters.

My Dearest Friend

Author: John Adams
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674026063
Format: PDF
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Presents a collection of letters between John and Abigail Adams that chronicle their lives and the events that surrounded them.

The Book of Abigail and John

Author: Abigail Adams
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 9781555535223
Format: PDF, Docs
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The letters of John and Abigail Adams are laid bare here, chronicling their long love affair, political opinions, and humor in 226 letters and diary entries and providing an intimate glimpse of early American history. Simultaneous.

First Thoughts

Author: Edith Belle Gelles
Publisher: Twayne Pub
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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"The Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party, two Continental Congresses and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution and the War of 1812, the presidencies of George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson - all these events occurred during the lifetime of Abigail Adams. Adams, in a voluminous body of correspondence, recorded in vivid detail not only these historic events but also their effects on her community, her family, and herself. Too often viewed narrowly as the wife of John Adams and the mother of John Quincy Adams, Abigail Adams was an important literary and historical figure in her own right. Her letters are filled with perceptive observations; they demonstrate great spontaneity, intelligence, and sincerity; and they depict in equal measure both the quotidian and the historic during the early years of the Republic." "Asserting that Abigail Adams's collected letters are "the best account that exists from the pre- to the post-Revolutionary period in America of a woman's life and world," Edith B. Gelles, a noted Adams expert and the author of Portia: The World of Abigail Adams, presents this first study to examine Adams's letters from the dual standpoints of biography and literary analysis. Adopting a topical, episodic approach, Gelles highlights Adams's letter-writing persona while giving due recognition to her achievements as wife, mother, sister, daughter friend, and patriot."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Adams Jefferson Letters

Author: Lester J. Cappon
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807838926
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An intellectual dialogue of the highest plane achieved in America, the correspondence between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson spanned half a century and embraced government, philosophy, religion, quotidiana, and family griefs and joys. First meeting as delegates to the Continental Congress in 1775, they initiated correspondence in 1777, negotiated jointly as ministers in Europe in the 1780s, and served the early Republic--each, ultimately, in its highest office. At Jefferson's defeat of Adams for the presidency in 1800, they became estranged, and the correspondence lapses from 1801 to 1812, then is renewed until the death of both in 1826, fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence. Lester J. Cappon's edition, first published in 1959 in two volumes, provides the complete correspondence between these two men and includes the correspondence between Abigail Adams and Jefferson. Many of these letters have been published in no other modern edition, nor does any other edition devote itself exclusively to the exchange between Jefferson and the Adamses. Introduction, headnotes, and footnotes inform the reader without interrupting the speakers. This reissue of The Adams-Jefferson Letters in a one-volume unabridged edition brings to a broader audience one of the monuments of American scholarship and, to quote C. Vann Woodward, 'a major treasure of national literature.'

Abigail Adams

Author: Edith B. Gelles
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136804870
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this book, Edith B. Gelles asserts that Abigail Adams' vivid, insightful letters are "the best account that exists from the pre to the post-Revolutionary period in America of a woman's life and world." Adams' spontaneous, witty letters serve dual purposes for the modern reader: it provides an intriguing first hand account of pivotal historical events and it shows how these events from the Boston Tea Party to the War of 1812 entered the private sphere. Included in the book is a chronology, notes and reference section and a selected bibliography. This book will be a must for all scholars of American literature, history and politics seeking to understand this literary figure.

Familiar Letters of John Adams and His Wife Abigail Adams

Author: Charles Francis Adams
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 9780266250104
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Excerpt from Familiar Letters of John Adams and His Wife Abigail Adams: During the Revolution, With a Memoir of Mrs. Adams The memorials of that generation by whose efforts the inde pendence of the United States was achieved are in great abun dance. There is hardly an event of importance, from the year 1765 to the date of the definitive treaty of peace with Great Britain, in September, 1783, which has not been recorded, either by the industry of actors upon the scene or by the indefatigable labors of a succeeding class of students. These persons have devoted themselves, with a highly commendable zeal, to the investigation of all particulars, even the most mi nute, that relate to this interesting period. The individuals called to appear most conspicuously in the Revolution have many of them left voluminous collections of papers, which, as time passes, find their way to the light by publication, and furnish important illustrations of the feelings and motives under which the contest was carried on. The actors are thus made to stand in bold relief before us. We not only see the public record, but the private commentary also; and these, taken in connec tion with the contemporaneous histories, all of which, however defective in philosophical analysis, are invaluable depositories of facts related by living witnesses, will serve to transmit to pos terity the details for a narration in as complete a form as will in all probability ever be attained by the imperfect faculties of man. Admitting these observations to be true, there is, neverthe less, a distinction to be drawn between the materials for a his tory of action and those for one of feeling; between the labors of men aiming at distinction among their fellow-beings, and the private, familiar sentiments that run into the texture of the social system, without remark or the hope of observation. Here it is that something like a void in our annals appears still to exist. Our history is for the most part wrapped up in the forms of office. The great men of the Revolution, in theeyes of posterity, are many of them like heroes of a mytholog ical age. They are seen, chiefly, when conscious that they are upon a theatre, where individual sentiment must be some times disguised, and often sacrificed, for the public good. Statesmen and Generals rarely say all they think or feel. The consequence is that, in the papers which come from them, they are made to assume a uniform of grave hue, which, though it doubtless exalts the opinion entertained of their perfections, somewhat diminishes the interest with which later generations scan their character. Students of human nature seek for ex amples of man under circumstances of difficulty and trial; man as he is, not as he would appear; but there are many reasons why they may be often baffled in the search. We look for the workings of the heart, when those of the head alone are pre sented to us. We watch the emotions of the spirit, and yet find clear traces only of the working of the intellect. The solitary meditation, the confidential whisper to a friend, never meant to reach the ear of the multitude, the secret wishes, not blazoned forth to catch applause, the fluctuations between fear and hope that most betray the springs of action, these are the guides to character, which most frequently vanish with the moment that called them forth, and leave nothing to posterity but those coarser elements for judgment that are found in elaborated results. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com