The Long Arc of Justice

Author: Richard D. Mohr
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231135211
Format: PDF
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Richard D. Mohr adopts a humanistic and philosophical approach to assessing public policy issues affecting homosexuals. His nuanced case for legal and social acceptance applies widely held ethical principles to various issues, including same-sex marriage, AIDS, and gays in the military. Mohr examines the nature of prejudices and other cultural forces that work against lesbian and gay causes and considers the role that sexuality plays in national rituals. In his support of same-sex marriage, Mohr defines matrimony as the development and maintenance of intimacy through which people meet their basic needs and carry out their everyday living, and he contends that this definition applies equally to homosexual and heterosexual couples. By drawing on culturally, legally, and ethically based arguments, Mohr moves away from tired political rhetoric and reveals the important ways in which the struggle for gay rights and acceptance relates to mainstream American society, history, and political life.

Gay and Lesbian Rights A Reference Handbook 2nd Edition

Author: David E. Newton
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598843079
Format: PDF, Docs
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This thoroughly updated edition provides readers with the background and resources needed to understand one of the greatest civil rights issues of our time. • Includes selections from laws and court cases relating to various aspects of the gay/lesbian civil rights movement • Chronicles an exhaustive list of important events in the gay and lesbian civil rights movement in the United States and Europe

Sex from Plato to Paglia M Z

Author: Alan Soble
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313334252
Format: PDF, ePub
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More than 150 alphabetically arranged entries on topics, thinkers, religions, movements, and concepts locate sexuality in its humanistic and social contexts.

Forcing the Spring

Author: Jo Becker
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143127233
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A groundbreaking work of reportage by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jo Becker,Forcing the Spring is the definitive account of five remarkable years in American civil rights history, when the United States experienced a tectonic shift on the issue of marriage equality. Focusing on the historic legal challenge of California's ban on same-sex marriage, Becker offers a gripping, behind-the scenes narrative told with the lightning pace of a great legal thriller. Taking the reader from the Oval Office to the Supreme Court ruling, from state-by-state campaigns to the landmark decision overturning DOMA, Forcing the Springis political and legal journalism at its finest. 'Not just the definitive account of the battle for same-sex marriage rights but a thrilling and compassionate one too. Grade A.' Entertainment Weekly'A stunningly intimate story.' The New York Times Book Review'Becker's account of the hearings, and her analysis of the complictated legal theories involved in the long appeals process, are excellent. Her writing about the four plaintiffs in the case - the true emotional heroes of this book - is particularly affecting.' Richard Socarides, The New Yorker

Minimizing Marriage

Author: Elizabeth Brake
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199911975
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Even in secular and civil contexts, marriage retains sacramental connotations. Yet what moral significance does it have? This book examines its morally salient features -- promise, commitment, care, and contract -- with surprising results. In Part One, "De-Moralizing Marriage," essays on promise and commitment argue that we cannot promise to love and so wedding vows are (mostly) failed promises, and that marriage may be a poor commitment strategy. The book contends with the most influential philosophical accounts of the moral value of marriage to argue that marriage has no inherent moral significance. Further, the special value accorded marriage sustains amatonormative discrimination - discrimination against non-amorous or non-exclusive caring relationships such as friendships, adult care networks, polyamorous groups, or urban tribes. The discussion raises issues of independent interest for the moral philosopher such as the possibilities and bounds of interpersonal moral obligations and the nature of commitment. The central argument of Part Two, "Democratizing Marriage," is that liberal reasons for recognizing same-sex marriage also require recognition of groups, polyamorists, polygamists, friends, urban tribes, and adult care networks. Political liberalism requires the disestablishment of monogamous amatonormative marriage. Under the constraints of public reason, a liberal state must refrain from basing law solely on moral or religious doctrines; but only such doctrines could furnish reason for restricting marriage to male-female couples or romantic love dyads. Restrictions on marriage should thus be minimized. But public reason can provide a strong rationale for minimal marriage: care, and social supports for care, are a matter of fundamental justice. Part Two also responds to challenges posed by property division on divorce, polygyny, and supporting parenting, and builds on critiques of marriage drawn from feminism, queer theory, and race theory. It argues, using the example of minimal marriage, for the compatibility of liberalism and feminism.

Wedlocked

Author: Katherine Franke
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479815748
Format: PDF, ePub
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The staggering string of victories by the gay rights movement’s campaign for marriage equality raises questions not only about how gay people have been able to successfully deploy marriage to elevate their social and legal reputation, but also what kind of freedom and equality the ability to marry can mobilize. Wedlocked turns to history to compare today’s same-sex marriage movement to the experiences of newly emancipated black people in the mid-nineteenth century, when they were able to legally marry for the first time. Maintaining that the transition to greater freedom was both wondrous and perilous for newly emancipated people, Katherine Franke relates stories of former slaves’ involvements with marriage and draws lessons that serve as cautionary tales for today’s marriage rights movements. While “be careful what you wish for” is a prominent theme, they also teach us how the rights-bearing subject is inevitably shaped by the very rights they bear, often in ways that reinforce racialized gender norms and stereotypes. Franke further illuminates how the racialization of same-sex marriage has redounded to the benefit of the gay rights movement while contributing to the ongoing subordination of people of color and the diminishing reproductive rights of women. Like same-sex couples today, freed African-American men and women experienced a shift in status from outlaws to in-laws, from living outside the law to finding their private lives organized by law and state licensure. Their experiences teach us the potential and the perils of being subject to legal regulation: rights—and specifically the right to marriage—can both burden and set you free.

Don t Tell Me to Wait

Author: Kerry Eleveld
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465073492
Format: PDF, ePub
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As a candidate in 2008, Barack Obama distanced himself from same-sex marriage, saying he believed marriage was “a sacred union” between a man and a woman. In 2012, he did just the opposite, proclaiming it was “important” for him to affirm the right of same-sex couples to marry. This dramatic about-face put the most powerful man in the world at the front of the battle for gay rights, giving LGBT Americans and their advocates an invaluable ally in their struggle for freedom. Just one year later, the Supreme Court would strike down key provisions of the Defense of Marriage Act, and no Democratic presidential nominee would ever again shun marriage equality. As former Advocate journalist Kerry Eleveld shows, Obama's support transformed the issue of gay rights from a political liability into an electoral imperative, and in Don't Tell Me to Wait she offers a boots-on-the-ground account of how gay rights activists pushed the president to this political tipping point. Obama's “evolution” on marriage equality was not the result of a benevolent politician who entered the Oval Office with a wealth of good intentions. Rather, pressure from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender activists changed the conversation, issue by issue. As a result of the protests and outcry following the passage of California's same-sex marriage ban, Obama realized that overturning the military's “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” policy was the one 2008 campaign promise he couldn't ignore. While pledges to other progressive constituencies fell apart during Obama's first two years in office, the LGBT rights movement protested the administration's fecklessness early and often. By the time the sun set on the 111th Congress, the “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” repeal had become the sole piece of major progressive legislation to become law. The repeal's overwhelming success and popularity paved the way for other LGBT advances, including the president's eventual embrace of the freedom to marry. With unprecedented access and unparalleled insights into this hot-button issue, Don't Tell Me to Wait captures a critical moment in LGBT history and demonstrates the power of activism to change the course of a presidency—and a nation.

A More Perfect Union

Author: Richard D. Mohr
Publisher: Beacon Press (MA)
ISBN: 9780807079331
Format: PDF
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Why Straight America Must Stand Up for Gay Rights. Shows how the most basic and widely held values of American society demand justice for gays and lesbians.