The Lost Boys of Zeta Psi

Author: Laurie A. Wilkie
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520260597
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
"Laurie Wilkie is making an important statement about the culture of fraternities, saving them from uncritical celebration on the one hand and the '"Animal House"' image on the other. She has given us a fascinating case study in the value and importance of the archaeology of the recent past."--Matthew Johnson, author of "Ideas of Landscape" "A fresh look at fraternity life, offering a nuanced view of its social benefits and shortcomings. This is an insightful and innovative interdisciplinary contribution to the emergent field of contemporary archaeology as well as to masculinity studies."--Mary Beaudry, author of "Findings: The Material Culture of Needlework and Sewing"

Black Feminist Archaeology

Author: Whitney Battle-Baptiste
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351573551
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Black feminist thought has developed in various parts of the academy for over three decades, but has made only minor inroads into archaeological theory and practice. Whitney Battle-Baptiste outlines the basic tenets of Black feminist thought and research for archaeologists and shows how it can be used to improve contemporary historical archaeology. She demonstrates this using Andrew Jackson?s Hermitage, the W. E. B. Du Bois Homesite in Massachusetts, and the Lucy Foster house in Andover, which represented the first archaeological excavation of an African American home. Her call for an archaeology more sensitive to questions of race and gender is an important development for the field.

Creating the College Man

Author: Daniel A. Clark
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299235335
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
How did a college education become so vital to American notions of professional and personal advancement? Reared on the ideal of the self-made man, American men had long rejected the need for college. But in the early twentieth century this ideal began to change as white men born in the U.S. faced a barrage of new challenges, among them a stultifying bureaucracy and growing competition in the workplace from an influx of immigrants and women. At this point a college education appealed to young men as an attractive avenue to success in a dawning corporate age. Accessible at first almost exclusively to middle-class white males, college funneled these aspiring elites toward a more comfortable and certain future in a revamped construction of the American dream. In Creating the College Man Daniel A. Clark argues that the dominant mass media of the era—popular magazines such as Cosmopolitan and the Saturday Evening Post—played an integral role in shaping the immediate and long-term goals of this select group of men. In editorials, articles, fiction, and advertising, magazines depicted the college man as simultaneously cultured and scientific, genteel and athletic, polished and tough. Such depictions underscored the college experience in powerful and attractive ways that neatly united the incongruous strains of American manhood and linked a college education to corporate success.

What Anthropologists Do

Author: Veronica Strang
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847885462
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
What is Anthropology? Why should you study it? What will you learn? And what can you do with it? What Anthropologists Do answers all these questions. And more. Anthropology is an astonishingly diverse and engaged subject that seeks to understand human social behaviour. What Anthropologists Do presents a lively introduction to the ways in which anthropologys unique research methods and cutting-edge thinking contribute to a very wide range of fields: environmental issues, aid and development, advocacy, human rights, social policy, the creative arts, museums, health, education, crime, communications technology, design, marketing, and business. In short, a training in Anthropology provides highly transferable skills of investigation and analysis. The book will be ideal for any readers who want to know what Anthropology is all about and especially for students coming to the study of Anthropology for the first time.

The Archaeology of Mothering

Author: Laurie A. Wilkie
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136755446
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Using archaeological materials recovered from a housesite in Mobile, Alabama, Laurie Wilkie explores how one extended African-American family engaged with competing and conflicting mothering ideologies in the post-Emancipation South.

Intellectual Manhood

Author: Timothy J. Williams
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618400
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
In this in-depth and detailed history, Timothy J. Williams reveals that antebellum southern higher education did more than train future secessionists and proslavery ideologues. It also fostered a growing world of intellectualism flexible enough to marry the era's middle-class value system to the honor-bound worldview of the southern gentry. By focusing on the students' perspective and drawing from a rich trove of their letters, diaries, essays, speeches, and memoirs, Williams narrates the under examined story of education and manhood at the University of North Carolina, the nation's first public university. Every aspect of student life is considered, from the formal classroom and the vibrant curriculum of private literary societies to students' personal relationships with each other, their families, young women, and college slaves. In each of these areas, Williams sheds new light on the cultural and intellectual history of young southern men, and in the process dispels commonly held misunderstandings of southern history. Williams's fresh perspective reveals that students of this era produced a distinctly southern form of intellectual masculinity and maturity that laid the foundation for the formulation of the post–Civil War South.

Journal of Northwest Anthropology

Author: Darby C. Stapp
Publisher: Northwest Anthropology
ISBN:
Format: PDF
Download Now
Modeling Precontact Land-Use in The Dalles: Site Types, Assemblage Structure, and Data Adequacy - Paul S. Solimano and Daniel M. Gilmour Stone Rings in the Umatilla National Forest, Southeastern Washington - R. Lee Lyman, Matthew T. Boulanger, and Dave N. Schmitt Insights on Adaptive Capacity: Three Indigenous Pacific Northwest Historical Narratives - Benedict J. Colombi and Courtland L. Smith At the Intersection of Orphaned Collections and Civic Engagement - Kali D.V. Oliver Public Archaeology in the West: A Case Study from Boise, Idaho - Mark Warner, Tracy Schwartz, Stacey Camp, Jessica Goodwin, Amanda Bielmann, and Tim Mace

The Archaeology of Anxiety

Author: Jeffrey Fleisher
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1493932314
Format: PDF
Download Now
Recent efforts to engage more explicitly with the interpretation of emotions in archaeology have sought new approaches and terminology to encourage archaeologists to take emotions seriously. This is part of a growing awareness of the importance of senses—what we see, smell, hear, and feel—in the constitution and reconstitution of past social and cultural lives. Yet research on emotion in archaeology remains limited, despite the fact that such states underpin many studies of socio-cultural transformation. The Archaeology of Anxiety draws together papers that examine the local complexities of anxiety as well as the variable stimuli—class or factional struggle, warfare, community construction and maintenance, personal turmoil, and responsibilities to (and relationships with) the dead—that may generate emotional responses of fear, anxiousness, worry, and concern. The goal of this timely volume is to present fresh research that addresses the material dimension of rites and performances related to the mitigation and negotiation of anxiety as well as the role of material culture and landscapes in constituting and even creating periods or episodes of anxiety.

Boomtown Saloons

Author: Kelly J. Dixon
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874177039
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
"The image of Old West saloons as sites of violence and raucous entertainment has been perpetuated by film and legend, but the true story of such establishments is far more complex. In Boomtown Saloons, archaeologist Kelly J. Dixon recounts the excavation of four historic saloon sites in Nevada's Virginia City, one of the West's most important boomtowns, and shows how the physical traces of this handful of disparate drinking places, affiliated with a range of ethnic and socioeconomic groups, offer a captivating new perspective on everyday life in the mining West."--Jacket.

Rethinking Campus Life

Author: Christine A. Ogren
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319756141
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
This edited volume explores the history of student life throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Chapter authors examine the expanding reach of scholarship on the history of college students; the history of underrepresented students, including black, Latino, and LGBTQ students; and student life at state normal schools and their successors, regional colleges and universities, and at community colleges and evangelical institutions. The book also includes research on drag and gender and on student labor activism, and offers new interpretations of fraternity and sorority life. Collectively, these chapters deepen scholarly understanding of students, the diversity of their experiences at an array of institutions, and the campus lives they built.