The Lowest Rung

Author: Mark Peel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521537599
Format: PDF, ePub
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This 2003 book is a fascinating and moving portrait of the people who are suffering in a more divided and less egalitarian Australian society. Based on the author's conversations with hundreds of people living in three areas commonly described as 'disadvantaged' - Inala in Queensland, Mount Druitt in New South Wales and Broadmeadows in Victoria - this is a book in which impoverished Australians, who are often absent from debates about poverty, tell their own stories. Some are funny, others are sad. There are stories about loss, despair and an uncertain future they can hardly bear to tell. But there are also stories about hope, and the capacity of poorer people to imagine and create a fairer world. Rather than focusing on abstractions such as the underclass, this book provides an intimate account of real people's fears, hopes and dilemmas in the face of growing inequality, entrenched unemployment, and fading opportunities for the young.

Diversity in Australia s Music

Author: Dorottya Fabian
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527520668
Format: PDF
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This volume showcases academic research into the rich diversity of music in Australia from colonial times to the present. Starting with an overview of developments during the past 50 years, the contributions discuss Western and non-western genres (opera, film, dance, choral, chamber); the history of music-making in particular cosmopolitan and regional centres (Canberra, Brisbane, the Hunter Valley, Alice Springs); old, new, and experimental compositions; and a variety of performers and ensembles active at particular points in time. In addition, cultural tropes and music as social practice are also explored, providing a rich tapestry of music and music-making in the country. The volume thus serves as a model for representing and approaching multicultural musical societies in an inclusive and comprehensive manner.

Letters of the Catholic Poor

Author: Lindsey Earner-Byrne
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316844951
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This innovative study of poverty in Independent Ireland between 1920 and 1940 is the first to place the poor at its core by exploring their own words and letters. Written to the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, their correspondence represents one of the few traces in history of Irish experiences of poverty, and collectively they illuminate the lives of so many during the foundation decades of the Irish state. This book keeps the human element central, so often lost when the framework of history is policy, institutions and legislation. It explores how ideas of charity, faith, gender, character and social status were deployed in these poverty narratives and examines the impact of poverty on the lives of these writers and the survival strategies they employed. Finally, it considers the role of priests in vetting and vouching for the poor and, in so doing, perpetuating the discriminating culture of charity.

The Poverty Wars

Author: Peter Saunders
Publisher: UNSW Press
ISBN: 9780868408101
Format: PDF, ePub
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Argues that as a nation Australia can afford to eliminate financial poverty. The fact we don't do so is a matter of choice, not affordability - as the experience of other countries demonstrates.

Australia

Author: Anthony Moran
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415944977
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this book Anthony Moran traces the development of contemporary Australian society in the global age, focusing on four major themes: settler/indigenous relations; economics and culture since the 1980s and their impact on national identity; the effects of increasing diversity fostered by globalization; and the transformation of Australian social space wrought by globalization.

Miss Cutler and the Case of the Resurrected Horse

Author: Mark Peel
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226653668
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Social workers produced thousands of case files about the poor during the interwar years. Analyzing almost two thousand such case files and traveling from Boston, Minneapolis, and Portland to London and Melbourne, Miss Cutler and the Case of the Resurrected Horse is a pioneering comparative study that examines how these stories of poverty were narrated and reshaped by ethnic diversity, economic crisis, and war. Probing the similarities and differences in the ways Americans, Australians, and Britons understood and responded to poverty, Mark Peel draws a picture of social work that is based in the sometimes fraught encounters between the poor and their interpreters. He uses dramatization to bring these encounters to life—joining Miss Cutler and that resurrected horse are Miss Lindstrom and the fried potatoes and Mr. O’Neil and the seductive client—and to give these people a voice. Adding new dimensions to the study of charity and social work, this book is essential to understanding and tackling poverty in the twenty-first century.

Fear of Food

Author: Carol Bacchi
Publisher: Spinifex Press
ISBN: 9781876756321
Format: PDF, Docs
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Incorporating diary entries and reflections, this personal account of one mother's struggles during the first 12 months of her son's life to get him to eat openly confronts the social challenges mothers encounter, including insensitive doctors, the marketing of maternity in the media, postpartum depression, and social isolation. The stinging question What if I don't love my child enough? is explored in this highly personal and moving story that argues mothers must speak out about the challenges and traumas they face in order to be understood.