The Making of Revolutionary Paris

Author: David Garrioch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520243277
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The evolution of Paris as a "revolutionary" city is traced here, with details of the economic, political, and social changes that made the city a seedbed for social foment in the eighteenth century. (HIstory)

Women in Revolutionary Paris 1789 1795

Author: Darline Gay Levy
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252008559
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Almost 200 years ago, the women of revolutionary Paris were demanding legal equity in marriage; educational opportunities for girls, including vocational training ; public instruction, licensing, and support for midwives; guarantees for women's rights to employment; and an end to the exclusion of women from certain professions. The editors have uncovered, translated, and annotated sixty documents which shed light on these and other socioeconomic struggles by women and their impact on the French Revolutionary era. This work makes a significant contribution to the growing appreciation of the role of women in history, politics, ideology, and social change." -- Back cover.

Paris as Revolution

Author: Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520208872
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"In this absolutely powerful and innovative book, Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson illuminates the complex links between the Revolution of 1789, the different revolutions that took place in 19th-century Paris, and two aesthetic forms characteristic of the cultural discourses of modernity: panoramic journalism and the realist and historical novels authored by Balzac, Flaubert, Hugo, Zola, and Valles. A work of cultural history with stimulating implications, Paris as Revolution is well-structured, carefully argued and problematized, and compelling in its scholarship."--Catherine Nesci, author of La Femme mode d'emploi "A fascinating and richly suggestive essay on the cultural geography of nineteenth-century Paris. It is imaginatively conceived, broad in its reach, boldly interdisciplinary. Ferguson's success in combining literary criticism, historical interpretation and sociological analysis to reconstruct the shifting meanings given to the experiences of urbanization and revolution is most impressive."--Jonathan Beecher, author of Charles Fourier: The Visionary and His World

The Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution

Author: David Andress
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 019100992X
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution brings together a sweeping range of expert and innovative contributions to offer engaging and thought-provoking insights into the history and historiography of this epochal event. Each chapter presents the foremost summations of academic thinking on key topics, along with stimulating and provocative interpretations and suggestions for future research directions. Placing core dimensions of the history of the French Revolution in their transnational and global contexts, the contributors demonstrate that revolutionary times demand close analysis of sometimes tiny groups of key political actors - whether the king and his ministers or the besieged leaders of the Jacobin republic - and attention to the deeply local politics of both rural and urban populations. Identities of class, gender and ethnicity are interrogated, but so too are conceptions and practices linked to citizenship, community, order, security, and freedom: each in their way just as central to revolutionary experiences, and equally amenable to critical analysis and reflection. This volume covers the structural and political contexts that build up to give new views on the classic question of the 'origins of revolution'; the different dimensions of personal and social experience that illuminate the political moment of 1789 itself; the goals and dilemmas of the period of constitutional monarchy; the processes of destabilisation and ongoing conflict that ended that experiment; the key issues surrounding the emergence and experience of 'terror'; and the short- and long-term legacies, for both good and ill, of the revolutionary trauma - for France, and for global politics.

The Abb Gr goire and the French Revolution

Author: Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520931091
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this age of globalization, the eighteenth-century priest and abolitionist Henri Grégoire has often been called a man ahead of his time. An icon of antiracism, a hero to people from Ho Chi Minh to French Jews, Grégoire has been particularly celebrated since 1989, when the French government placed him in the Pantheon as a model of ideals of universalism and human rights. In this beautifully written biography, based on newly discovered and previously overlooked material, we gain access for the first time to the full complexity of Grégoire's intellectual and political universe as well as the compelling nature of his persona. His life offers an extraordinary vantage from which to view large issues in European and world history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and provides provocative insights into many of the prevailing tensions, ideals, and paradoxes of the twenty-first century. Focusing on Grégoire's idea of "regeneration," that people could literally be made anew, Sepinwall argues that revolutionary universalism was more complicated than it appeared. Tracing the Revolution's long-term legacy, she suggests that while it spread concepts of equality and liberation throughout the world, its ideals also helped to justify colonialism and conquest.

Introduction The Old Regime of Teeth The Smile of Sensibility Cometh the Dentist The Making of a Revolution The Transient Smile Revolution Beyond the Smile Revolution Postscript Towards the Twentieth Century Smile Revolution Notes Index

Author: Colin Jones
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198715811
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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You could be forgiven for thinking that the smile has no history; it has always been the same. However, just as different cultures in our own day have different rules about smiling, so did different societies in the past. In fact, amazing as it might seem, it was only in late eighteenth century France that western civilization discovered the art of the smile. In the 'Old Regime of Teeth' which prevailed in western Europe until then, smiling was quite literally frowned upon. Individuals were fatalistic about tooth loss, and their open mouths would often have been visually repulsive. Rules of conduct dating back to Antiquity disapproved of the opening of the mouth to express feelings in most social situations. Open and unrestrained smiling was associated with the impolite lower orders. In late eighteenth-century Paris, however, these age-old conventions changed, reflecting broader transformations in the way people expressed their feelings. This allowed the emergence of the modern smile par excellence: the open-mouthed smile which, while highlighting physical beauty and expressing individual identity, revealed white teeth. It was a transformation linked to changing patterns of politeness, new ideals of sensibility, shifts in styles of self-presentation - and, not least, the emergence of scientific dentistry. These changes seemed to usher in a revolution, a revolution in smiling. Yet if the French revolutionaries initially went about their business with a smile on their faces, the Reign of Terror soon wiped it off. Only in the twentieth century would the white-tooth smile re-emerge as an accepted model of self- presentation. In this entertaining, absorbing, and highly original work of cultural history, Colin Jones ranges from the history of art, literature, and culture to the history of science, medicine, and dentistry, to tell a unique and untold story about a facial expression at the heart of western civilization.

Defeated Flesh

Author: Bertrand Taithe
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742500495
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Defeated Flesh is a compelling study of the French defeat of 1870 and the socialist uprising of the Commune of Paris, a crucial turning point in the making of modern France. By examining the history of the body and medicine, Taithe shows how the French mobilized for the war effort and how their ultimate defeat had devastating cultural and social consequences that led to the fin de siFcle spirit.