The Man who Lost His Language

Author: Sheila Hale
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 1843105640
Format: PDF, Docs
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When Sir John Hale suffered a stroke that left him unable to walk, write or speak, his wife, Shelia, followed every available medical trail seeking knowledge of his condition and how he might be restored to health. This book is a unique exploration of aphasia - losing the ability to use or comprehend words - as well as of the resilience of love.

Talking About Aphasia

Author: Parr
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335232515
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is about living with aphasia - a language impairment which can result from stroke. Drawing on in-depth interviews with fifty aphasic people, it explores the experience of aphasia from the dramatic onset of stroke and loss of language to the gradual revelation of its long-term consequences. The story is told from the perspective of aphasic people themselves.

Milestones in the History of Aphasia

Author: Juergen Tesak
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135422478
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Milestones in the History of Aphasia surveys the history of aphasia from its earliest mentions in ancient times, to the turn of the new millennium in 2000. The book takes a predominantly chronological approach starting with an examination of the earliest medical documents and medieval attempts to understand aphasia, to the momentous events of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, up to the development of modern cognitive neuroscience in recent years. It traces the development of theory about and understanding of aphasia, and the role of significant individuals in this history. The result is a well illustrated introduction to the main events and personalities in the rich history of aphasia. This accessible book provides a unique insight into the fascinating development of research in aphasia. It will be of great interest to undergraduates and postgraduates, researchers, teachers and clinicians in psychology, speech and language pathology and therapy, neurology and linguistics.

Language Disorders Across the LifeSpan

Author: Betsy Vinson
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1435498593
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Written for core introductory coursework on language disorders, LANGUAGE DISORDERS ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN, 3rd edition has been thoroughly updated to illustrate how the latest research can be applied to actual practice by speech-language pathologists when diagnosing and treating language delays and disorders in clients of all ages. The book maintains a clear progression from preschool to school-age children to adults in order to differentiate the origins and progression of language disorders. An expanded discussion of the long term potential impacts of delays and disorders in the preschool years leads in to a new chapter that explores how to set the stage for linguistic and literacy success. Expanded content also includes a new chapter on autism, coverage of right hemisphere deficits in TBI, an expanded discussion of syndromes, and a new discussion of the effects of nicotine on the developing fetus. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Lost Words

Author: L. S. Jacyna
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400831180
Format: PDF
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In the mid-nineteenth century, physicians observed numerous cases in which individuals lost the ability to form spoken words, even as they remained sane and healthy in most other ways. By studying this condition, which came to be known as "aphasia," neurologists were able to show that functions of mind were rooted in localized areas of the brain. Here L. S. Jacyna analyzes medical writings on aphasia to illuminate modern scientific discourse on the relations between language and the brain, from the very beginnings of this discussion through World War I. Viewing these texts as literature--complete with guiding metaphors and rhetorical strategies--Jacyna reveals the power they exerted on the ways in which the human subject was constructed in medicine. Jacyna submits the medical texts to various critical readings and provides a review of the pictorial representation involved with the creation of aphasiology. He considers the scientific, experimental, and clinical aspects of this new field, together with the cultural, professional, and political dimensions of what would become the authoritative discourse about language and the brain. At the core of the study is an inquiry into the processes whereby men and women suffering from language loss were transformed into the "aphasic," an entity amenable to scientific scrutiny and capable of yielding insights about the fundamental workings of the brain. But what became of the subject's human identity? Lost Words explores the links among language, humanity, and mental presence that make the aphasiological project one of continuing fascination.

A Stitch of Time

Author: Lauren Marks
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451697511
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"An eloquent memoir of a 27 year old actress who suffered a massive brain aneurysm onstage at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and awoke to discover that she had aphasia, a rare condition in which one loses the ability to speak, read and write"--Provided by publisher.