Singular Women

Author: Kristen Frederickson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520231658
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"An interesting and original collection. A must for all those interested in women artists and the women who have written about them."--Linda Nochlin, author of Representing Women "Kristen Frederickson and Sarah Webb have provided us with a missing link, a truly feminist art history that connects with the work done in the 1970s and thankfully ignores the 'post-feminist' hiatus. Singular Women is a model for future scholarship on women's art. If only the books it inspires are as rigorous, vigorous, varied, and readable as this one."--Lucy Lippard, author of The Pink Glass Swan: Selected Feminist Essays on Art "The most provocative, challenging, and intimate writing to appear in feminist art history since Linda Nochlin launched the field with her essay 'Why Are There No Great Women Artists?' Thirty years later there are both great women artists and great women writers. This book assembles some of the best and boldest among them. Not afraid to address the boring, the failed, the neglected, or the masterpiece, Singular Women sets the standard for feminist art history of the twenty-first century."--Peggy Phelan, author of the survey essay in Art and Feminism, ed. Helena Reckitt "This important volume addresses the vexed question whether the traditional monograph, rightly under suspicion in recent years, can be reinvented to serve feminist art history well. Its excellent--and varied--essays answer with a confident and convincing affirmative, demonstrating how we can talk about women's art practice without abandoning the biographical and social stories that enable and illuminate it."--Janet Wolff, author of Resident Alien: Feminist Cultural Criticism "Contributes new understandings to the now familiar problems of writing biographies of artists and, in particular, writing about a woman artist. It re-inscribes the woman artist in the discourse while probing--through a variety of approaches--the possibilities for a critical discourse on and appreciation of the woman artist."--Catherine M. Soussloff, author of The Absolute Artist: The Historiography of a Concept "Demonstrates how women historians have had to develop close relationships (real or imagined) with the artists about whom they write. The reader is allowed to see the desire that constitutes, but is normally hidden within, the writing of history."--Jane Blocker, author of Where Is Ana Mendieta? Identity, Performativity, and Exile

Creative Perspective for Artists and Illustrators

Author: Ernest W. Watson
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486137732
Format: PDF, ePub
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Distinguished art educator and publisher shows importance of classic perspective rules — and when to violate them. Picture plane, foreshortening and convergence, other topics. Analysis of works by leading artists and illustrators. 349 illustrations.

How to Write Art History

Author: Anne D'Alleva
Publisher: Laurence King Publishing
ISBN: 9781856694889
Format: PDF
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An invaluable handbook, enables students to get the most from their art history course, and empowers readers to approach their coursework with confidence and energy. The book introduces two basic art historical methods formal analysis and contextual analysis revealing how to use these methods in writing papers and in class discussion

The Big Archive

Author: Sven Spieker
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262533577
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The archive as a crucible of twentieth-century modernism and key for understanding contemporary art.

Human Accomplishment

Author: Charles Murray
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061745677
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A sweeping cultural survey reminiscent of Barzun's From Dawn to Decadence. "At irregular times and in scattered settings, human beings have achieved great things. Human Accomplishment is about those great things, falling in the domains known as the arts and sciences, and the people who did them.' So begins Charles Murray's unique account of human excellence, from the age of Homer to our own time. Employing techniques that historians have developed over the last century but that have rarely been applied to books written for the general public, Murray compiles inventories of the people who have been essential to the stories of literature, music, art, philosophy, and the sciences—a total of 4,002 men and women from around the world, ranked according to their eminence. The heart of Human Accomplishment is a series of enthralling descriptive chapters: on the giants in the arts and what sets them apart from the merely great; on the differences between great achievement in the arts and in the sciences; on the meta-inventions, 14 crucial leaps in human capacity to create great art and science; and on the patterns and trajectories of accomplishment across time and geography. Straightforwardly and undogmatically, Charles Murray takes on some controversial questions. Why has accomplishment been so concentrated in Europe? Among men? Since 1400? He presents evidence that the rate of great accomplishment has been declining in the last century, asks what it means, and offers a rich framework for thinking about the conditions under which the human spirit has expressed itself most gloriously. Eye-opening and humbling, Human Accomplishment is a fascinating work that describes what humans at their best can achieve, provides tools for exploring its wellsprings, and celebrates the continuing common quest of humans everywhere to discover truths, create beauty, and apprehend the good.