The Oxford Guide to Library Research

Author: Thomas Mann
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199931062
Format: PDF, Docs
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The information world has undergone drastic changes since the publication of the 3rd edition of The Oxford Guide to Library Research in 2005, and Thomas Mann, a veteran reference librarian at the Library of Congress, has extensively revised his text to reflect those changes. This book will answer two basic questions: First, what is the extent of the significant research resources you will you miss if you confine your research entirely, or even primarily, to sources available on the open Internet? Second, if you are trying to get a reasonably good overview of the literature on a particular topic, rather than just "something quickly" on it, what are the several alternative methods of subject searching--which are not available on the Web--that are usually much more efficient for that purpose than typing keywords into a blank search box, with the results displayed by relevance-ranking computer algorithms? This book shows researchers how to do comprehensive research on any topic. It explains the variety of search mechanisms available, so that the researcher can have the reasonable confidence that s/he has not overlooked something important. This includes not just lists of resources, but discussions of the ways to search within them: how to find the best search terms, how to combine the terms, and how to make the databases (and other sources) show relevant material even when you don't know how to specify the best search terms in advance. The book's overall structuring by nine methods of searching that are applicable in any subject area, rather than by subjects or by types of literature, is unique among guides to research. Also unique is the range and variety of concrete examples of what to do--and of what not to do. The book is not "about" the Internet: it is about the best alternatives to the Internet--the sources that are not on the open Web to begin with, that can be found only through research libraries and that are more than ever necessary for any kind of substantive scholarly research. More than any other research guide available, this book directly addresses and provides solutions to the serious problems outlined in recent studies documenting the profound lack of research skills possessed by today's "digital natives."

Library Research Models

Author: Thomas Mann
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195093957
Format: PDF
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Most researchers, even with computers, find only a fraction of the sources available to them. As Library of Congress reference librarian Thomas Mann explains, researchers tend to work within one or another mental framework that limits their basic perception of the universe of knowledge available to them. Some, for example, use a subject-disciplinary method which leads them to a specific list of sources on a particular subject. But, Mann points out, while this method allows students and researchers to find more specialized sources, it is also limiting--they may not realize that works of interest to their own subject appear within the literature of many other disciplines. A researcher looking through anthropology journals, for example, might not discover that the MLA International Bibliography provides the best coverage of folklore journals. In Library Research Models, Mann examines the several alternative mental models people use to approach the task of research, and demonstrates new, more effective ways of finding information. Drawing on actual examples gleaned from 15 years' experience in helping thousands of researchers, he not only shows the full range of search options possible, but also illuminates the inevitable tradeoffs and losses of access that occur when researchers limit themselves to a specific method. In two chapters devoted to computers he examines the use of electronic resources and reveals their value in providing access to a wide range of sources as well as their disadvantages: what people are not getting when they rely solely on computer searches; why many sources will probably never be in databases; and what the options are for searching beyond computers. Thomas Mann's A Guide to Library Research Methods was widely praised as a definitive manual of library research. Ronald Gross, author of The Independent Scholar's Handbook called it "the savviest such guide I have ever seen--bracingly irreverent and brimming with wisdom." The perfect companion volume, Library Research Models goes even further to provide a fascinating look at the ways in which we can most efficiently gain access to our vast storehouses of knowledge.

A Guide to Library Research Methods

Author: Thomas Mann
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195049442
Format: PDF, ePub
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Explains how to use systematic browsing, and subject, keyword, citation, and computer searches, and includes advice on expert and unconventional sources

The Oxford Guide for Writing Tutors

Author: Melissa Ianetta
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199941841
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Oxford Guide for Writing Tutors introduces two conversations to the tutor's preperation, one about the creation of knowledge in writing programs, the other about tutor research. This approach to tutor training provides several benefits. First, it allows tutors to test their theories ofwhat might work in a writing center session and helps them to move professional conversation towards why such things happen. They bridge the theory-practice divide that often frustrates both novices and experiences tutors. By conducting research to answer such questions, tutors can help themselves, the writers with whom they work, their fellow tutors - and the writers with whom they work. And, further, this approach gives the reader new methods for appreciating and critiquing scholarly work, making it easier tounderstand the best ways to help writers and to move the field forward.As writing tutoring programs take on a variety of forms and pursue a range of missions, this book aims to create a flexible text whose contents can be easily rearranged to support a broad spectrum of reader needs. Each chapter, accordingly, can be read independently; the text does not rely on asequential reading to create meaning.The book also includes intra-textual and extra-textual references for the reader who wants to inquire further. That is, throughout the book are references to material in other chapters that might be of interest to the reader intrigued by the topic at hand. So too, in each chapter, we includereferences to and citations of the scholarship that supports much of the "common knowledge" of the field, including, in the Handbook, both previous tutor education textbooks and research from the field. The aim is to aid the interested reader's inquiry into the scholarship of the field as well as toground advice about practice in research that testifies to the effectiveness a range of tutoring practices. Much of the scholarship cited throughout the book is authored by undergraduate tutor-researchers as well as several former tutors who were graduate students when they published their articles. This crucial aspect best models the ways in which tutors themselves can bring together practice andresearch, in their day-to-day work and in their informed thinking about this work. Including tutor voices is an important tradition of the tutor education textbook because these are voices that speak to the issues concerning tutors in a range of institutions and programs across the country.

The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy

Author: John L. Heilbron
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199883769
Format: PDF, Docs
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With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay reader and the professional alike, this book can be turned to for the answer to how scientists learned to measure the speed of light, or consulted for neat, careful summaries of topics as complicated as quantum field theory and as vast as the universe. The entries, each written by a noted scholar and edited by J. L. Heilbron, Professor of History and Vice Chancellor, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, reflect the most up-to-date research and discuss the applications of the scientific disciplines to the wider world of religion, law, war, art and literature. No other source on these two branches of science is as informative or as inviting. Thoroughly cross-referenced and accented by dozens of black and white illustrations, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy is the source to turn to for anyone looking for a quick explanation of alchemy, x-rays and any type of matter or energy in between.

Oxford Guide to Effective Writing and Speaking

Author: John Seely
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199652708
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Oxford Guide to Effective Writing & Speaking is the essential guide for everyone who needs to communicate clearly and effectively. It combines practical advice on specific writing and speaking tasks with detailed self-help chapters covering grammar, spelling, and the writing process itself.

The Oxford Handbook of Research Strategies for Clinical Psychology

Author: Jonathan S. Comer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199793549
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Oxford Handbook of Research Strategies for Clinical Psychology has recruited some of the field's foremost experts to explicate the essential research strategies currently used across the modern clinical psychology landscape that maximize both scientific rigor and clinical relevance.

Digital Paper

Author: Andrew Abbott
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022616781X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Today’s researchers have access to more information than ever before. Yet the new material is both overwhelming in quantity and variable in quality. How can scholars survive these twin problems and produce groundbreaking research using the physical and electronic resources available in the modern university research library? In Digital Paper, Andrew Abbott provides some much-needed answers to that question. Abbott tells what every senior researcher knows: that research is not a mechanical, linear process, but a thoughtful and adventurous journey through a nonlinear world. He breaks library research down into seven basic and simultaneous tasks: design, search, scanning/browsing, reading, analyzing, filing, and writing. He moves the reader through the phases of research, from confusion to organization, from vague idea to polished result. He teaches how to evaluate data and prior research; how to follow a trail to elusive treasures; how to organize a project; when to start over; when to ask for help. He shows how an understanding of scholarly values, a commitment to hard work, and the flexibility to change direction combine to enable the researcher to turn a daunting mass of found material into an effective paper or thesis. More than a mere how-to manual, Abbott’s guidebook helps teach good habits for acquiring knowledge, the foundation of knowledge worth knowing. Those looking for ten easy steps to a perfect paper may want to look elsewhere. But serious scholars, who want their work to stand the test of time, will appreciate Abbott’s unique, forthright approach and relish every page of Digital Paper.