Exploring Prehistoric Identity in Europe

Author: Victoria Ginn
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 184217813X
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Identity is relational and a construct, and is expressed in a myriad of ways. For example, material culture and its pluralist meanings have been readily manipulated by humans in a prehistoric context in order to construct personal and group identities. Artefacts were often from or reminiscent of far-flung places and were used to demonstrate membership of an (imagined) regional, or European community. Earthworks frequently archive maximum visual impact through elaborate ramparts and entrances with the minimum amount of effort, indicating that the construction of identities were as much in the eye of the perceivor, as of the perceived. Variations in domestic architectural style also demonstrate the malleability of identity, and the prolonged, intermittent use of particular places for specific functions indicates that the identity of place is just as important in our archaeological understanding as the identity of people. By using a wide range of case studies, both temporally and spatially, these thought processes may be explored further and diachronic and geographic patterns in expressions of identity investigated.

The Archaeology of the East Anglian Conversion

Author: Richard Hoggett
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1843835959
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The huge changes in the landscape as a result of the Christian conversion of East Anglia are examined in this multi-disciplinary study.

Anglo Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 14

Author: Sarah Semple
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 178297508X
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Volume 14 of the Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History series is dedicated to the archaeology of early medieval death, burial and commemoration. Incorporating studies focusing upon Anglo-Saxon England as well as research encompassing western Britain, Continental Europe and Scandinavia, this volume originated as the proceedings of a two-day conference held at the University of Exeter in February 2004. It comprises of an Introduction that outlines the key debates and new approaches in early medieval mortuary archaeology followed by eighteen innovative research papers offering new interpretations of the material culture, monuments and landscape context of early medieval mortuary practices. Papers contribute to a variety of ongoing debates including the study of ethnicity, religion, ideology and social memory from burial evidence. The volume also contains two cemetery reports of early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries from Cambridgeshire.

Early Medieval Mortuary Practices

Author: Sarah Semple
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Volume 14 of the Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History series is dedicated to the archaeology of early medieval death, burial and commemoration. Incorporating studies focusing upon Anglo-Saxon England as well as research encompassing western Britain, Continental Europe and Scandinavia, this volume originated as the proceedings of a two-day conference held at the University of Exeter in February 2004. It comprises of an Introduction that outlines the key debates and new approaches in early medieval mortuary archaeology followed by eighteen innovative research papers offering new interpretations of the material culture, monuments and landscape context of early medieval mortuary practices. Papers contribute to a variety of ongoing debates including the study of ethnicity, religion, ideology and social memory from burial evidence. The volume also contains two cemetery reports of early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries from Cambridgeshire.

The evolutionary archaeology of ceramic diversity in ancient Fiji

Author: Ethan E. Cochrane
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Ltd
ISBN: 9781407303956
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The research presented here investigates the evolution of material cultural diversity in the Yasawa Islands in the northwestern corner of the Fijian archipelago. This work builds upon several field seasons of basic research in the Yasawas, as well as other large-scale ceramic analyses in Fiji. This study constructs answers using an explanatory framework explicitly designed to account for the evolution of cultural diversity in prehistory. This explanatory framework combines the effects of cultural transmission, selection and other sorting processes, and innovation. Using this explanatory framework this research attempts to answer the following three questions: 1. What domains of ceramic similarity in the Yasawa Islands can be used to define culturally transmitting populations or lineages; 2. What are the spatial and temporal distributions of transmission lineages defined along different avenues of transmission; and 3. What are the possible explanations for the distribution of these lineages? Chapter 2 examines some of the previous archaeological and other research in Fiji that has attempted to explain or document cultural, biological, and linguistic diversity. Chapter 3 more completely develops the theoretical framework used to explain prehistoric ceramic similarities and difference in terms of transmission lineages. An outline of the natural and cultural history of the Yasawa Islands is presented in Chapter 4. Classifications of ceramic variation and other analyses are presented in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6 cladistic and seriation analyses generate hypotheses for the transmission history of Yasawa Islands populations. Chapter 7 reviews the results of this research in the context of other archaeological work in Fiji. The approach to explaining cultural similarities and differences employed in this research indicates that prehistoric cultural diversity can be examined using cultural transmission, selection, and innovation to produce empirically testable hypotheses regarding the historical relatedness of populations. The further development of this approach by scholars will do much to answer long-standing questions.

Wasperton

Author: M. O. H. Carver
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The newest research on a major Anglo-Saxon site paints a vivid picture of the beginnings of England.