The Political Classroom

Author: Diana E. Hess
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317575032
Format: PDF, Docs
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WINNER 2016 Grawemeyer Award in Education Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers. Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?" Based on the findings from a large, mixed-method study about discussions of political issues within high school classrooms, The Political Classroom presents in-depth and engaging cases of teacher practice. Paying particular attention to how political polarization and social inequality affect classroom dynamics, Hess and McAvoy promote a coherent plan for providing students with a nonpartisan political education and for improving the quality of classroom deliberations.

Teaching History for the Common Good

Author: Keith C. Barton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135645132
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik present a clear overview of competing ideas among educators, historians, politicians, and the public about the nature and purpose of teaching history, and they evaluate these debates in light of current research on students' historical thinking. In many cases, disagreements about what should be taught to the nation's children and how it should be presented reflect fundamental differences that will not easily be resolved. A central premise of this book, though, is that systematic theory and research can play an important role in such debates by providing evidence of how students think, how their ideas interact with the information they encounter both in school and out, and how these ideas differ across contexts. Such evidence is needed as an alternative to the untested assumptions that plague so many discussions of history education. The authors review research on students' historical thinking and set it in the theoretical context of mediated action--an approach that calls attention to the concrete actions that people undertake, the human agents responsible for such actions, the cultural tools that aid and constrain them, their purposes, and their social contexts. They explain how this theory allows educators to address the breadth of practices, settings, purposes, and tools that influence students' developing understanding of the past, as well as how it provides an alternative to the academic discipline of history as a way of making decisions about teaching and learning the subject in schools. Beyond simply describing the factors that influence students' thinking, Barton and Levstik evaluate their implications for historical understanding and civic engagement. They base these evaluations not on the disciplinary study of history, but on the purpose of social education--preparing students for participation in a pluralist democracy. Their ultimate concern is how history can help citizens engage in collaboration toward the common good. In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik: *discuss the contribution of theory and research, explain the theory of mediated action and how it guides their analysis, and describe research on children's (and adults') knowledge of and interest in history; *lay out a vision of pluralist, participatory democracy and its relationship to the humanistic study of history as a basis for evaluating the perspectives on the past that influence students' learning; *explore four principal "stances" toward history (identification, analysis, moral response, and exhibition), review research on the extent to which children and adolescents understand and accept each of these, and examine how the stances might contribute to--or detract from--participation in a pluralist democracy; *address six of the principal "tools" of history (narrative structure, stories of individual achievement and motivation, national narratives, inquiry, empathy as perspective-taking, and empathy as caring); and *review research and conventional wisdom on teachers' knowledge and practice, and argue that for teachers to embrace investigative, multi-perspectival approaches to history they need more than knowledge of content and pedagogy, they need a guiding purpose that can be fulfilled only by these approaches--and preparation for participatory democracy provides such purpose. Teaching History for the Common Good is essential reading for history and social studies professionals, researchers, teacher educators, and students, as well as for policymakers, parents, and members of the general public who are interested in history education or in students' thinking and learning about the subject.

Teaching Democracy

Author: Walter Parker
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807742724
Format: PDF, Docs
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In Teaching Democracy, Walter Parker makes a unique and thoughtful contribution to the hot debate between proponents of multicultural education and those who favor a cultural literacy approach. Parker conclusively demonstrates that educating for democratic citizenship in a multicultural society includes a fundamental respect for diversity. This scholarly yet accessible work: Bridges the widening gap between multicultural education and civic education; provides powerful teaching strategies that educators can use to draw children creatively and productively into a way of life that protects and nurtures cultural pluralism and racial equity; explains the unity, diversity confusion that is found in popular media as well as in multicultural- and citizenship-education initiatives; defines deliberative discussion and explores its promise as the centerpiece of democratic education in schools, both elementary and secondary.

Making Citizens

Author: Beth C. Rubin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415874610
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Can social studies classrooms be effective "makers" of citizens if much of what occurs in these classrooms does little to prepare young people to participate in the civic and political life of our democracy? Making Citizens illustrates how social studies can recapture its civic purpose through an approach that incorporates meaningful civic learning into middle and high school classrooms. The book explains why social studies teachers, particularly those working in diverse and urban areas, should infuse civic education into their teaching, and outlines how this can be done effectively. Directed at both pre-service and in-service social studies teachers and designed for easy integration into social studies methods courses, this book follows students and teachers in social studies classrooms as they experience a new approach to the traditional, history-oriented social studies curriculum, using themes, essential questions, discussion, writing, current events and action research to explore enduring civic questions. Following the experiences of three teachers working at three diverse high schools, Beth C. Rubin considers how social studies classrooms might become places where young people study, ponder, discuss and write about relevant civic questions while they learn history. She draws upon the latest sociocultural theories on youth civic identity development to describe a field-tested approach to civic education that takes into consideration the classroom and curricular constraints faced by new teachers.

Handbook on Teaching Social Issues

Author: Ronald W. Evans
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607528754
Format: PDF, Docs
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This handbook explores the issues-centered curriculum for social studies teaching and how student performance reflects an intellectual capacity to address public issues. The book is divided into 11 parts with essays to address specific aspects of the approach. The foreword, written by Shirley Engle, establishes a context for issues-based curriculum. Essays include: "Defining Issues-Centered Education" (Ronald W. Evans; Fred M. Newmann; David Warren Saxe); "Building a Rationale for Issues-Centered Education" (Anna S. Ochoa-Becker); "The Engle-Ochoa Decision Making Model for Citizenship Education" (Rodney F. Allen); "Using Issues in the Teaching of American History" (David Warren Saxe); "World History and Issues-Centered Instruction" (Richard E. Gross); "Issues-Centered Approaches to Teaching Geography Courses" (A. David Hill; Salvatore J. Natoli); "Issues-Centered Global Education" (Merry M. Merryfield; Connie S. White); "An Approach to Issues-Oriented Economic Education" (Beverly J. Armento; Francis W. Rushing; Wayne A. Cook); "Teaching Issues-Centered Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology" (Jerry A. Ligon; George W. Chilcoat); "Issue-Centered Curricula and Instruction at the Middle Level" (Samuel Totten; Jon Pedersen); "An Issues-Centered Curriculum for High School Social Studies" (Ronald W. Evans; Jerry Brodkey); "Assessing Student Learning of an Issue-Oriented Curriculum" (Walter C. Parker); "International Social Studies: Alternative Futures" (James L. Barth); "International Relations/Foreign Policy Teaching Resources" (Mary E. Soley); "Domestic Economic Policy" (Ronald A. Banaszak); "Teaching about International Human Rights" (Nancy Flowers); and "Children's Rights" (Beverly C.Edmonds). An afterword is provided by James Shaver. (EH)

American Educational Thought 2nd Ed

Author: Andrew J. Milson
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607523663
Format: PDF, ePub
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American Educational Thought: Essays from 16401940 contains primary source readings from the mid 1600s to 1940. The goal of the work is to provide teachers, contemporary scholars of education, and policymakers with the most significant arguments made on the subject of American education during this time period. In this second edition of the book, the editors have included numerous new works that open up new possibilities for discussion, represent more wideranging viewpoints, and provide even richer context for making sense of American educational thought.

Talking to Strangers

Author: Danielle Allen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226014681
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Don't talk to strangers" is the advice long given to children by parents of all classes and races. Today it has blossomed into a fundamental precept of civic education, reflecting interracial distrust, personal and political alienation, and a profound suspicion of others. In this powerful and eloquent essay, Danielle Allen, a 2002 MacArthur Fellow, takes this maxim back to Little Rock, rooting out the seeds of distrust to replace them with "a citizenship of political friendship." Returning to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954 and to the famous photograph of Elizabeth Eckford, one of the Little Rock Nine, being cursed by fellow "citizen" Hazel Bryan, Allen argues that we have yet to complete the transition to political friendship that this moment offered. By combining brief readings of philosophers and political theorists with personal reflections on race politics in Chicago, Allen proposes strikingly practical techniques of citizenship. These tools of political friendship, Allen contends, can help us become more trustworthy to others and overcome the fossilized distrust among us. Sacrifice is the key concept that bridges citizenship and trust, according to Allen. She uncovers the ordinary, daily sacrifices citizens make to keep democracy working—and offers methods for recognizing and reciprocating those sacrifices. Trenchant, incisive, and ultimately hopeful, Talking to Strangers is nothing less than a manifesto for a revitalized democratic citizenry.

Teenage Citizens

Author: Constance A. Flanagan
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674067231
Format: PDF, ePub
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Too young to vote or pay taxes, teenagers are off the radar of political scientists. Yet civic identities form during adolescence and are rooted in experiences as members of families, schools, and community organizations. Flanagan helps us understand how young people come to envisage civic engagement, and how their political identities take form.

Teaching for Dissent

Author: Sarah Marie Stitzlein
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250915
Format: PDF
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Teaching for Dissent looks at the implications of new forms of dissent for educational practice. The reappearance of dissent in political meetings and street protests opens new possibilities for improved democratic life and citizen participation. This book argues that this possibility will not be fulfilled if schools do not cultivate the skills necessary for our citizens to engage in political dissent. The authors look at how practices in schools, such as the testing regime and the 'hidden curriculum', suppress students' ability to voice ideas that stand in opposition to the status quo. Teaching for Dissent calls for a realignment of the curriculum and the practices of schooling with a guiding vision of democratic participation.

Controversy in the Classroom

Author: Diana E. Hess
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135897344
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In a conservative educational climate that is dominated by policies like No Child Left Behind, one of the most serious effects has been for educators to worry about the politics of what they are teaching and how they are teaching it. As a result, many dedicated teachers choose to avoid controversial issues altogether in preference for "safe" knowledge and "safe" teaching practices. Diana Hess interrupts this dangerous trend by providing readers a spirited and detailed argument for why curricula and teaching based on controversial issues are truly crucial at this time. Through rich empirical research from real classrooms throughout the nation, she demonstrates why schools have the potential to be particularly powerful sites for democratic education and why this form of education must include sustained attention to authentic and controversial political issues that animate political communities. The purposeful inclusion of controversial issues in the school curriculum, when done wisely and well, can communicate by example the essence of what makes communities democratic while simultaneously building the skills and dispositions that young people will need to live in and improve such communities.