Negro Building

Author: Mabel O. Wilson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520268423
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Traces the evolution of black public history from the Civil War to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, giving voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content--Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, A. Philip Randolph, Horace Cayton, and Margaret Burroughs

Coleman Young and Detroit Politics

Author: Wilbur C. Rich
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814320945
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Coleman Young was elected Detroit's first black mayor in 1973, and was the city's longest-serving chief executive. This volume combines biography with political analysis to outline the basic strategy underlying Young's approach to policy making, and trace the economic changes in the city.

African American Women Speak Out on Anita Hill Clarence Thomas

Author: Geneva Smitherman
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814325308
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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An essential voice has been added to the ongoing national debate and public discourse on race, class, and gender. African American Women Speak Out on Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas is the first commentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas confrontation written exclusively by African American women. Margaret Walker Alexander, Angela Y. Davis, Darlene Clark Hine, Harriette McAdoo, Julianne Malveaux, and other scholars and writers offer reflections and in-depth analyses on one of the most wrenching public dramas in recent history. Diverse and interdisciplinary in scope, the contributions clarify the significance of the event and examine the broader ramifications for the African American community and the nation.

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939

Author: Robert L Harris Jr.
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151087X
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.

The Black Revolution on Campus

Author: Martha Biondi
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520953525
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Black Revolution on Campus is the definitive account of an extraordinary but forgotten chapter of the black freedom struggle. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Black students organized hundreds of protests that sparked a period of crackdown, negotiation, and reform that profoundly transformed college life. At stake was the very mission of higher education. Black students demanded that public universities serve their communities; that private universities rethink the mission of elite education; and that black colleges embrace self-determination and resist the threat of integration. Most crucially, black students demanded a role in the definition of scholarly knowledge. Martha Biondi masterfully combines impressive research with a wealth of interviews from participants to tell the story of how students turned the slogan "black power" into a social movement. Vividly demonstrating the critical linkage between the student movement and changes in university culture, Biondi illustrates how victories in establishing Black Studies ultimately produced important intellectual innovations that have had a lasting impact on academic research and university curricula over the past 40 years. This book makes a major contribution to the current debate on Ethnic Studies, access to higher education, and opportunity for all.

American Babylon

Author: Robert O. Self
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400844177
Format: PDF, Docs
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As the birthplace of the Black Panthers and a nationwide tax revolt, California embodied a crucial motif of the postwar United States: the rise of suburbs and the decline of cities, a process in which black and white histories inextricably joined. American Babylon tells this story through Oakland and its nearby suburbs, tracing both the history of civil rights and black power politics as well as the history of suburbanization and home-owner politics. Robert Self shows that racial inequities in both New Deal and Great Society liberalism precipitated local struggles over land, jobs, taxes, and race within postwar metropolitan development. Black power and the tax revolt evolved together, in tension. American Babylon demonstrates that the history of civil rights and black liberation politics in California did not follow a southern model, but represented a long-term struggle for economic rights that began during the World War II years and continued through the rise of the Black Panthers in the late 1960s. This struggle yielded a wide-ranging and profound critique of postwar metropolitan development and its foundation of class and racial segregation. Self traces the roots of the 1978 tax revolt to the 1940s, when home owners, real estate brokers, and the federal government used racial segregation and industrial property taxes to forge a middle-class lifestyle centered on property ownership. Using the East Bay as a starting point, Robert Self gives us a richly detailed, engaging narrative that uniquely integrates the most important racial liberation struggles and class politics of postwar America.