The Purposes Practices and Professionalism of Teacher Reflectivity

Author: Edward G. Pultorak
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 1607097095
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Very little information about the impact of reflection on teacher performance, teacher retention, and student learning is available in teacher preparation programs. This book provides practical and research-based chapters that offer greater clarity about the particular kinds of reflection that matter and avoids talking about teacher reflection generically, which implies that all kinds of reflection are of equal value. This book addresses five very pertinent concepts: (1) teacher reflectivity in theory and research, (2) teacher reflectivity in teacher education programs, (3) teacher reflectivity with teacher candidates, (4) teacher reflectivity in schools and classrooms, and (5) teacher reflectivity and international perspectives.

Reflectivity and Cultivating Student Learning

Author: Edward G. Pultorak
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475810717
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Reflectivity and Cultivating Student Learning includes theory, research, and practice appropriate for teacher educators, teacher candidates, classroom teachers, school administrators, and educational researchers.

Practicing Core Reflection

Author: Frits G. Evelein
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135019665
Format: PDF, ePub
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Practicing Core Reflection features 78 concrete educational activities and exercises based on research. These can be used individually and in groups to support 'teaching and learning from within.’ Core Reflection is an approach focused on people's personal strengths and on using practical strategies to overcome obstacles to the enactment of these strengths. This approach has been used in many contexts all over the world and has shown great promise in helping to re-chart the course for education and to re-think its purpose in global and democratic societies. Additional tools (Cards, Figures, Tables, Forms in a printable PDF format) are provided on this website (under the eResources tab). Building on the theoretical foundations established in Korthagen, Kim, and Green’s Teaching and Learning from Within: A Core Reflection Approach to Quality and Inspiration in Education, this companion volume can be used together with it or on its own to engage educators in exploring what it means to bring out the best in oneself, in students, in colleagues, and others—a critically significant project if education is to realize new levels of possibility and potential.

Exemplary Teachers of Students in Poverty

Author: Geoff Munns
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135125333
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Education and poverty exist in a highly contested relationship even in the developed world. On the one hand, educational outcomes seem solidly attached to socio-economic status, and on the other, education is often cited as a way out of poverty. Success at de-coupling poverty from educational outcomes varies across the developed world. The issues connecting education and poverty are complex, but the question of the successful engagement of students from poor backgrounds involves a complex mix of public policy on poverty, public policy on education, and teacher action. This book focuses on a number of exemplary teachers who demonstrate a set of common pedagogical qualities, assisting them to work productively with persistent classroom challenges in low SES classrooms. Exemplary Teachers of Students in Poverty shares successful classroom practice from schools serving diverse and disadvantaged communities, and stresses that opportunities in school can influence educational engagement and encourage students to achieve. The text locates itself in international debates about education and poverty, and reports on the Teachers for a Fair Go project - an Australian research project into the work of a number of teachers who were successful at engaging students from poor backgrounds. Included in the book: teaching in low SES communities what exemplary teachers of students in low SES communities do specific pedagogical approaches in literacy, ICT, creativity and culturally responsive practices students’ voices professional qualities of these teachers Exemplary Teachers of Students in Poverty will greatly benefit researchers, teacher educators and trainee teachers, allowing them to gain a much deeper understanding of the issues, constraints and perspectives in teaching contexts across low SES communities.

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Format: PDF, ePub
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Developing and Supporting Critically Reflective Teachers

Author: Frank Hernandez
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463009868
Format: PDF
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This collection centres the diverse narrative experiences of six early-career US teachers who identify as critically reflective practitioners. The contributors cogently demonstrate how teachers with critically reflective mindsets take active steps to ensure that they are cognizant of how their intersecting social identities impact how they arrive at making different types of decisions (big and small), interact with students from varied backgrounds, and negotiate competing demands and expectations in and out of their classrooms. The contributors have carefully thought about how learning and teaching are complex processes that involve significant ethical, moral, and social responsibilities. While they do not offer easy answers to the complex challenges that teachers negotiate on a daily basis, their willingness to share their concerns, experiences, and lesson learned offer timely perspectives about the possibilities and promise of using critical reflection as a means to challenge and close persistent academic, equity, and opportunity gaps that disproportionately and persistently impact students from underserved populations. The editors offer strategies for developing and supporting critically reflective teachers with a focus on transforming PK-12 and teacher education through an equity-centric lens. They contend that aspiring and earlier-career teachers greatly benefit from employing critical reflection in their daily lives to not only survive but to also thrive in an increasingly complex sociopolitical climate. Additional resources and guiding questions are included with specific foci on teacher educators and other major decision-makers in PK-12 education who are directly involved with the education, professional development, and socialization of early-career teachers.

International Teacher Education

Author: Lily Orland-Barak
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 178441669X
Format: PDF, ePub
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The book fills a gaping hole in the teacher education literature. Nowhere is there a volume that globally surveys teacher education pedagogies and invites international scholars to describe the most productive ones in their home countries.

Transforming Classroom Practice

Author: Arlene Borthwick
Publisher: International Society for Technology in educ
ISBN: 9781564842466
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Although there is no one right approach to working with teachers, professional developers will increase their chances for success when they base their work on a solid theoretical background of adult learning theory and organizational development, along with an understanding of lessons learned from the practice of others through the years, both nationally and internationally. This book provides an overview of professional development programs that have demonstrated longterm success through assessment of outcomes. The models described here explore approaches that expand teachers knowledge, skill, and confidence in using technology tools in teaching and learning environments, with the focus on improving teaching and learning rather than on the technology use. Thirteen chapters cover a wide range of topics, including a history of professional development in educational technology and a grounding in the relevant literature; successful and cutting-edge professional development models that discuss program planning, implementation, and assessment; and a discussion of lessons to be learned. The chapters are presented against a backdrop of selected relevant literature. Also available: Visual Arts Units for All Levels - ISBN 1564842428 IT's Elementary!: Integrating Technology in the Primary Grades - ISBN 1564842282 About the Author Arlene Borthwick is Department Chair and Associate Professor, Integrated Studies in Teaching, Technology, and Inquiry, at the National College of Education at National-Louis University (Chicago). She is the President of ISTE's Special Interest Group for Teacher Educators and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Computing in Teacher Education. Melissa Pierson is Director of Teacher Education and Associate Professor of Instructional Technology at the University of Houston. Her current research interests include the integration of technology, pedagogy, and content (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge, or TPCK) in teacher education, and the use of inquiry and action research to inform novice teachers' technology integration practices.

Educational Research and Innovation Pedagogical Knowledge and the Changing Nature of the Teaching Profession

Author: Guerriero Sonia
Publisher: OECD Publishing
ISBN: 9264270698
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Highly qualified and competent teachers are fundamental for equitable and effective education systems. Teachers today are facing higher and more complex expectations to help students reach their full potential and become valuable members of 21st century society. The nature and variety of these ...