The Samburu

Author: Paul Spencer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134371535
Format: PDF
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Samburu society is a gerontocracy in which power rests with the older men; men under thirty may not marry or otherwise assert their personal independence. This nomadic tribe from the arid regions of northern Kenya cling to their traditional way of life despite the rapid change throughout Africa. The author spent more than two years during the 1960's amongst the Samburu, and as an adopted member of one of their clans, he perceived how their values and attitudes are closely interwoven with a social system that resists change.

The Expansive Moment

Author: Jack Goody
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521456661
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Jack Goody's new book explores the history of social anthropology as an emergent discipline in the interwar years. It focuses on key practitioners, such as Malinowski and Fortes, and explores how far ideological approaches adopted by social anthropologists were defined by the institutions in which they developed, particularly in response to key issues of the time: colonialism, anti-Semitism and communism. Goody focuses on Britain and Africa, and draws on his own wide-ranging personal fieldwork experience.

The Sonjo of Tanganyika

Author: Robert F. Gray
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429958188
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Originally published in 1963, this was the first monograph concerning an African people in which an irrigation-based society was studied in detail and its implications explored. The Sonjo, a Bantu-speaking people isolated among cattle pastoralists of what was Northern Tanganyika, are remarkable for their complex irrigation system and political organization. The inter-connections between the irrigation system, the religious cult of a culture hero, and the special features of their social organization are at the core of this analysis.

Christianity Rediscovered

Author: Vincent J. Donovan
Publisher: Hymns Ancient and Modern Ltd
ISBN: 9780334028550
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This profound and thought-provoking book is one of the classics of modern missionary writing. Superficially just a good missionary story, about how one man brought a number of groups of Masai people in east Africa to Christian faith, it is something much more than that. For in what the author says about the method and content of evangelism; the meaning of the eucharist; and the nature of ministry, we are led back to the question our understandings of the mission of the church in all its contexts. For Donovan, his experiences in Africa meant a total reappraisal of the meaning of his faith, and therefore a rediscovery of his Christianity. His book, which is written with moving simplicity, continues to represent a provocative challenge to all those engaged in issues of evangelism and multiculturalism.

Hopes in Friction

Author: Lotte Meinert
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607528797
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Universal Primary Education programs are being promoted around the globe as the solution to poverty and health problems, but very little indepth qualitative knowledge is available about the experiences of these programs in children's lifeworlds. Hopes in Friction offers a vivid portrait of life and the implementation of Universal Primary Education in Eastern Uganda, based on longterm fieldwork following a group of children as they grow up. The book considers how the actions and hopes of these children and families, to attain what they perceive as 'a good life', are crosscut by political aspirations and projects of schooling and health education. When hopes are in friction inspiration as well as disappointment occur. Policy makers in Uganda and in international organisations expect health improvements as one of the bonuses of education programs. Families in Eastern Uganda also hope for and experience health – in the local sense of a good life – as part of schooling. Lotte Meinert explores the taken for granted effect of schooling on health and focuses a careful eye on how boys and girls appropriate and negotiate ideas and moralities about health in the context of what is possible ethically, materially and experientially.

Contesting the Commons

Author: Carolyn K. Lesorogol
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472050249
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Over centuries, African pastoralist societies have crafted institutions that enable them to survive in their harsh, semi-arid environment. Effectively managing communally held land has been one key to their success and a cornerstone of their social organization. Over the last two decades, however, a number of pastoralist communities have sought to transform their land tenure systems from communal to private ownership. In Contesting the Commons, Carolyn K. Lesorogol draws on eighteen months of fieldwork and ten previous years of work and residence among the Samburu to ask: What accounts for this challenge to an important, well-adapted, and seemingly highly functional institution? What are the effects of privatization of land on household well-being, individual behavior, and social relations? How can understanding the trajectory of institutional change in this case help us comprehend the dynamic processes of social transformation in general? "Contesting the Commons is one of the best books that I have read on the politics of land and social order in Africa. Lesorogol offers a creative and nuanced approach to questions of property rights and social norms. This is a very impressive addition to the general literature on institutional change." ---Jack Knight, Sidney W. Soeurs Professor of Government, Department of Political Science, Washington University in St. Louis Carolyn K. Lesorogol is Assistant Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology at George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis. She was a consultant for the National Science Foundation project, "The Roots of Human Sociality: An Ethno-Experimental Exploration of Economic Norms in 16 Small-Scale Societies," from 2001-2004, and she has also received a National Science Foundation grant and a Fulbright-Hays grant.

Pastoralism and Development in Africa

Author: Andy Catley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415540712
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Once again, the Horn of Africa has been in the headlines. And once again the news has been bad: drought, famine, conflict, hunger, suffering and death. The finger of blame has been pointed in numerous directions: to the changing climate, to environmental degradation, to overpopulation, to geopolitics and conflict, to aid agency failures, and more. But it is not all disaster and catastrophe. Many successful development efforts at 'the margins' often remain hidden, informal, sometimes illegal; and rarely in line with standard development prescriptions. If we shift our gaze from the capital cities to the regional centres and their hinterlands, then a very different perspective emerges. These are the places where pastoralists live. They have for centuries struggled with drought, conflict and famine. They are resourceful, entrepreneurial and innovative peoples. Yet they have been ignored and marginalised by the states that control their territory and the development agencies who are supposed to help them. This book argues that, while we should not ignore the profound difficulties of creating secure livelihoods in the Greater Horn of Africa, there is much to be learned from development successes, large and small. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars with an interest in development studies and human geography, with a particular emphasis on Africa. It will also appeal to development policy-makers and practitioners.

Navigating Terrains of War

Author: Henrik Vigh
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781845451493
Format: PDF, ePub
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Through the concept of "social navigation," this book sheds light on the mobilization of urban youth in West Africa. Social navigation offers a perspective on praxis in situations of conflict and turmoil. It provides insights into the interplay between objective structures and subjective agency, thus enabling us to make sense of the opportunistic, sometimes fatalistic and tactical ways in which young people struggle to expand the horizons of possibility in a world of conflict, turmoil and diminishing resources.