The Science of History in Victorian Britain

Author: Ian Hesketh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317322959
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Hesketh challenges accepted notions of a single scientific approach to history. Instead, he draws on a variety of sources – monographs, lectures, correspondence – from eminent Victorian historians to uncover numerous competing discourses.

Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain

Author: Mark Bevir
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316738949
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain explores the rise and nature of historicist thinking about such varied topics as life, race, character, literature, language, economics, empire, and law. The contributors show that the Victorians typically understood life and society as developing historically in a way that made history central to their intellectual inquiries and their public culture. Although their historicist ideas drew on some Enlightenment themes, they drew at least as much on organic ideas and metaphors in ways that lent them a developmental character. This developmental historicism flourished alongside evolutionary motifs and romantic ideas of the self. The human sciences were approached through narratives, and often narratives of reason and progress. Life, individuals, society, government, and literature all unfolded gradually in accord with underlying principles, such as those of rationality, nationhood, and liberty. This book will appeal to those interested in Victorian Britain, historiography, and intellectual history.

Science and Salvation

Author: Aileen Fyfe
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226276489
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Threatened by the proliferation of cheap, mass-produced publications, the Religious Tract Society issued a series of publications on popular science during the 1840s. The books were intended to counter the developing notion that science and faith were mutually exclusive, and the Society's authors employed a full repertoire of evangelical techniques—low prices, simple language, carefully structured narratives—to convert their readers. The application of such techniques to popular science resulted in one of the most widely available sources of information on the sciences in the Victorian era. A fascinating study of the tenuous relationship between science and religion in evangelical publishing, Science and Salvation examines questions of practice and faith from a fresh perspective. Rather than highlighting works by expert men of science, Aileen Fyfe instead considers a group of relatively undistinguished authors who used thinly veiled Christian rhetoric to educate first, but to convert as well. This important volume is destined to become essential reading for historians of science, religion, and publishing alike.

The science of energy

Author: Crosbie Smith
Publisher: Burns & Oates
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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Traditional accounts of the energy concept have tended to emphasize its discovery, an inevitable product of the progress of science in the 19th century. This new history places the construction of the concept firmly in its social context.

Predicting the Weather

Author: Katharine Anderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226019705
Format: PDF, Docs
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Victorian Britain, with its maritime economy and strong links between government and scientific enterprises, founded an office to collect meteorological statistics in 1854 in an effort to foster a modern science of the weather. But as the office turned to prediction rather than data collection, the fragile science became a public spectacle, with its forecasts open to daily scrutiny in the newspapers. And meteorology came to assume a pivotal role in debates about the responsibility of scientists and the authority of science. Studying meteorology as a means to examine the historical identity of prediction, Katharine Anderson offers here an engrossing account of forecasting that analyzes scientific practice and ideas about evidence, the organization of science in public life, and the articulation of scientific values in Victorian culture. In Predicting the Weather, Anderson grapples with fundamental questions about the function, intelligibility, and boundaries of scientific work while exposing the public expectations that shaped the practice of science during this period. A cogent analysis of the remarkable history of weather forecasting in Victorian Britain, Predicting the Weather will be essential reading for scholars interested in the public dimensions of science.

Science Reform and Politics in Victorian Britain

Author: Lawrence Goldman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139433013
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book is a study of the relationships between social thought, social policy and politics in Victorian Britain. Goldman focuses on the activity of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, known as the Social Science Association. For three decades this served as a forum for the discussion of Victorian social questions and as an influential adviser to governments, and its history discloses how social policy was made in these years. The Association, which attracted many powerful contributors, including politicians, civil servants, intellectuals and reformers, had influence over policy and legislation on matters as diverse as public health and women's legal and social emancipation. The SSA reveals the complex roots of social science and sociology buried in the non-academic milieu of nineteenth-century reform. And its influence in the United States and Europe allows for a comparative approach to political and intellectual development in this period.

Public Science and Public Policy in Victorian England

Author: Roy M. MacLeod
Publisher: Variorum Publishing
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book comprises nine essays, selected from Roy MacLeod's work on the social history of Victorian science, and is concerned with the analysis of science as a responsibility and opportunity for 19th-century statecraft. It illuminates the origins of environmental regulation, the creation of scientific inspectorates, the reform of scientific institutions, and the association of government with the patronage and support of fundamental research. Above all, it explores several of the ways in which British scientists became 'statesmen in disguise', negotiating interests and professional goals by association with the interests of the state as 'provider' and agent of efficiency in education and in the application of research.

Operations Without Pain The Practice and Science of Anaesthesia in Victorian Britain

Author: S. Snow
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230209491
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The introduction of anaesthesia to Victorian Britain marked a defining moment between modern medicine and earlier practices. This book uses new information from John Snow's casebooks and London hospital archives to revise many of the existing historical assumptions about the early history of surgical anaesthesia. By examining complex patterns of innovation, reversals, debate and geographical difference, Stephanie Snow shows how anaesthesia became established as a routine part of British medicine.

Mesmerized

Author: Alison Winter
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226902234
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Across Victorian Britain, in castles and cottages, rectories and pubs, and even hospitals and churches, thousands of women and hundreds of men were put into mesmeric trances. Apparently reasonable human beings twisted into bizarre postures, called out in unknown languages, and placidly bore assaults that should have caused unbearable pain. The Victorians were literally entranced - mesmerized - with this phenomenon.