The Seven Pillars of Statistical Wisdom

Author: Stephen M. Stigler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674970217
Format: PDF
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What gives statistics its unity as a science? Stephen Stigler sets forth the seven foundational ideas of statistics—a scientific discipline related to but distinct from mathematics and computer science and one which often seems counterintuitive. His original account will fascinate the interested layperson and engage the professional statistician.

The Seven Pillars of Statistical Wisdom

Author: Ernest DeWitt Burton Distinguished Service Professor of Statistics Stephen M Stigler
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674088917
Format: PDF
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What gives statistics its unity as a science? Stephen Stigler sets forth the seven foundational ideas of statistics a scientific discipline related to but distinct from mathematics and computer science and one which often seems counterintuitive. His original account will fascinate the interested layperson and engage the professional statistician."

Statistics on the Table

Author: Stephen M. Stigler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674009790
Format: PDF, ePub
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This lively collection of essays examines statistical ideas with an ironic eye for their essence and what their history can tell us for current disputes. The topics range from seventeenth-century medicine and the circulation of blood, to the cause of the Great Depression and the effect of the California gold discoveries of 1848 upon price levels, to the determinations of the shape of the Earth and the speed of light, to the meter of Virgil's poetry and the prediction of the Second Coming of Christ.

Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Author: T. E. Lawrence
Publisher: Wordsworth Editions
ISBN: 9781853264696
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Written between 1919 and 1926, this text tells of the campaign aganist the Turks in the Middle East, encompassing gross acts of cruelty and revenge, ending in a welter of stink and corpses in a Damascus hospital.

Statistics As Principled Argument

Author: Robert P. Abelson
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135694419
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In this illuminating volume, Robert P. Abelson delves into the too-often dismissed problems of interpreting quantitative data and then presenting them in the context of a coherent story about one's research. Unlike too many books on statistics, this is a remarkably engaging read, filled with fascinating real-life (and real-research) examples rather than with recipes for analysis. It will be of true interest and lasting value to beginning graduate students and seasoned researchers alike. The focus of the book is that the purpose of statistics is to organize a useful argument from quantitative evidence, using a form of principled rhetoric. Five criteria, described by the acronym MAGIC (magnitude, articulation, generality, interestingness, and credibility) are proposed as crucial features of a persuasive, principled argument. Particular statistical methods are discussed, with minimum use of formulas and heavy data sets. The ideas throughout the book revolve around elementary probability theory, t tests, and simple issues of research design. It is therefore assumed that the reader has already had some access to elementary statistics. Many examples are included to explain the connection of statistics to substantive claims about real phenomena.

Statistics Done Wrong

Author: Alex Reinhart
Publisher: No Starch Press
ISBN: 1593276206
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Statistics Done Wrong describes how researchers often go wrong and teaches you the best practices for avoiding their mistakes.

Fisher Neyman and the Creation of Classical Statistics

Author: Erich L. Lehmann
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441995001
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Classical statistical theory—hypothesis testing, estimation, and the design of experiments and sample surveys—is mainly the creation of two men: Ronald A. Fisher (1890-1962) and Jerzy Neyman (1894-1981). Their contributions sometimes complemented each other, sometimes occurred in parallel, and, particularly at later stages, often were in strong opposition. The two men would not be pleased to see their names linked in this way, since throughout most of their working lives they detested each other. Nevertheless, they worked on the same problems, and through their combined efforts created a new discipline. This new book by E.L. Lehmann, himself a student of Neyman’s, explores the relationship between Neyman and Fisher, as well as their interactions with other influential statisticians, and the statistical history they helped create together. Lehmann uses direct correspondence and original papers to recreate an historical account of the creation of the Neyman-Pearson Theory as well as Fisher’s dissent, and other important statistical theories.

In Defence of Objective Bayesianism

Author: Jon Williamson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199228000
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Objective Bayesianism is a methodological theory that is currently applied in statistics, philosophy, artificial intelligence, physics and other sciences. This book develops the formal and philosophical foundations of the theory, at a level accessible to a graduate student with some familiarity with mathematical notation.

Willful Ignorance

Author: Herbert I. Weisberg
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118593790
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An original account of willful ignorance and how this principle relates to modern probability and statistical methods Through a series of colorful stories about great thinkers and the problems they chose to solve, the author traces the historical evolution of probability and explains how statistical methods have helped to propel scientific research. However, the past success of statistics has depended on vast, deliberate simplifications amounting to willful ignorance, and this very success now threatens future advances in medicine, the social sciences, and other fields. Limitations of existing methods result in frequent reversals of scientific findings and recommendations, to the consternation of both scientists and the lay public. Willful Ignorance: The Mismeasure of Uncertainty exposes the fallacy of regarding probability as the full measure of our uncertainty. The book explains how statistical methodology, though enormously productive and influential over the past century, is approaching a crisis. The deep and troubling divide between qualitative and quantitative modes of research, and between research and practice, are reflections of this underlying problem. The author outlines a path toward the re-engineering of data analysis to help close these gaps and accelerate scientific discovery. Willful Ignorance: The Mismeasure of Uncertainty presents essential information and novel ideas that should be of interest to anyone concerned about the future of scientific research. The book is especially pertinent for professionals in statistics and related fields, including practicing and research clinicians, biomedical and social science researchers, business leaders, and policy-makers.