The Shtetl

Author: Steven T. Katz
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814748317
Format: PDF, Docs
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Dating from the sixteenth century, there were hundreds of shtetls—Jewish settlements—in Eastern Europe that were home to a large and compact population that differed from their gentile, mostly peasant neighbors in religion, occupation, language, and culture. The shtetls were different in important respects from previous types of Jewish settlements in the Diaspora in that Jews had rarely formed a majority in the towns in which they lived. This was not true of the shtetl, where Jews sometimes comprised 80% or more of the population. While the shtetl began to decline during the course of the nineteenth century, it was the Holocaust which finally destroyed it. During the last thirty years the shtetl has attracted a growing amount of scholarly attention, though gross generalizations and romanticized nostalgia continue to affect how the topic is treated. This volume takes a new look at this most important facet of East European Jewish life. It helps to correct the notion that the shtetl was an entirely Jewish world and shows the ways in which the Jews of the shtetl interacted both with their co-religionists and with their gentile neighbors. The volume includes chapters on the history of the shtetl, its myths and realities, politics, gender dynamics, how the shtetl has been (mis)represented in literature, and the changes brought about by World War I and the Holocaust, among others. Contributors: Samuel Kassow, Gershon David Hundert, Immanuel Etkes, Nehemia Polen, Henry Abramson, Konrad Zielinski, Jeremy Dauber, Israel Bartel, Naomi Seidman, Mikhail Krutikov, Arnold J. Band, Katarzyna Wieclawska, Yehunda Bauer, and Elie Wiesel.

Elie Wiesel

Author: Steven T. Katz
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253008123
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel, best known for his writings on the Holocaust, is also the accomplished author of novels, essays, tales, and plays as well as portraits of seminal figures in Jewish life and experience. In this volume, leading scholars in the fields of Biblical, Rabbinic, Hasidic, Holocaust, and literary studies offer fascinating and innovative analyses of Wiesel's texts as well as illuminating commentaries on his considerable influence as a teacher and as a moral voice for human rights. By exploring the varied aspects of Wiesel's multifaceted career—his texts on the Bible, the Talmud, and Hasidism as well as his literary works, his teaching, and his testimony—this thought-provoking volume adds depth to our understanding of the impact of this important man of letters and towering international figure.

On the Trails of Tradition

Author: Eliezer Segal
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610271033
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Academic rivalries, medical ethics, child brides, the social etiquette of gift-giving-these and many other familiar issues have a long and fascinating history among the diverse communities and personalities that have made their contributions to the Jewish tradition. Unfortunately, this enthralling lore is often known only to scholarly specialists or readers of esoteric academic journals and monographs, much of it unavailable in English. In the present collection of short studies, Eliezer Segal introduces the public to the fruits of Judaic scholarship, while employing a charming style that combines erudition and wit. On the Trails of Tradition is a worthy successor to the author's acclaimed collections: Why Didn't I Learn That in Hebrew School? (1999), Ask Now of the Days that Are Past (2005) and A Meeting-Place for the Wise (2008).

The Paranoid Apocalypse

Author: Richard Landes
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814748929
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, first published in Russia around 1905, claimed to be the captured secret protocols from the first Zionist Congress in Basel in 1897 describing a plan by the Jewish people to achieve global domination. While the document has been proven to be fake, much of it plagiarized from satirical anti-Semitic texts, it had a major impact throughout Europe during the first half of the 20th century, particularly in Germany. After World War II, the text was further denounced. Anyone who referred to it as a genuine document was seen as an ignorant hate-monger. Yet there is abundant evidence that The Protocols is resurfacing in many places. The Paranoid Apocalypse re-examines the text’s popularity, investigating why it has persisted, as well as larger questions about the success of conspiracy theories even in the face of claims that they are blatantly counterfactual and irrational. It considers the medieval pre-history of The Protocols, the conditions of its success in the era of early twentieth-century secular modernity, and its post-Holocaust avatars, from the Muslim world to Walmart and Left-wing anti-American radicalism. Contributors argue that the key to The Protocols’ longevity is an apocalyptic paranoia that lays the groundwork not only for the myth’s popularity, but for its implementation as a vehicle for genocide and other brutal acts.

I Shall Not Die

Author: Hart N. Hasten
Publisher: Gefen Publishing House Ltd
ISBN: 9789652293022
Format: PDF, Mobi
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He came penniless to the United States after surviving the Holocaust Hart Hasten rose to the top levels of finance and industry. He became an integral part of his community at large, not only giving of his wealth but also his time and knowledge. He supported the Indiana University, United Jewish Communities, and many more, and founded The Hasten Hebrew Academy of Indianapolis. He has been living in Indianapolis, Indiana since 1964, and visits Israel several times per year. Two of his three children, and their families, live in Israel. The book I Shall Not Die! is the personal memoir of Holocaust survivor, Hart N. Hasten. Looking back from the perspective of age seventy, the author presents an amazing account of escape and rescue from Nazi occupied Poland and his formative years in the DP camps of Europe. The saga continues as Hasten arrives in America and achieves extraordinary success in business and attains a position of international leadership in Jewish affairs. The book's central core is an intimate account of Hasten s twenty-five year friendship with revered Israeli political leader and Prime Minister, Menachem Begin. Hasten serves up a fascinating series of personal portraits, anecdotes and insights culled from his close relationships with Israeli and Jewish luminaries including Ariel Sharon, Elie Wiesel and Benjamin Netanyahu. Through it all, Hasten articulates the driving force and commitment to Jewish strength and independence that have defined him as a world recognized leader, as a serious and observant Jew and as a man."

Hasidic Tales of the Holocaust

Author: Yaffa Eliach
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307794490
Format: PDF, ePub
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Derived by the author from interviews and oral histories, these eighty-nine original Hasidic tales about the Holocaust provide unprecedented witness, in a traditional idiom, to the victims' inner experience of "unspeakable" suffering. This volume constitutes the first collection of original Hasidic tales to be published in a century. "An important work of scholarship and a sudden clear window onto the heretofore sealed world of the Hasidic reaction to the Holocaust. Its true stories and fanciful miracle tales are a profound and often poignant insight into the souls of those who suffered terribly at the hands of the Nazis and who managed somehow to use that very suffering as the raw material for their renewed lives." -- Chaim Potok "A beautiful collection." -- Saul Bellow "Yaffa Eliach provides us with stories that are wonderful and terrible -- true myths. We learn how people, when suffering dying, and surviving can call forth their humanity with starkness and clarity. She employs her scholarly gifts only to connect the tellers of the tales, who bear witness, to the reader who is stunned and enriched." -- Robert J. Lifton "In the extensive literature on the Holocaust, this is a unique book. Through it we can attain a glimpse of the victims' inner life and spiritual resources. Yaffa Eliach has done a superb job." -- Jehuda Reinharz From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust

Author: Shmuel Spector
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814793565
Format: PDF, Mobi
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More information and sample text and photos available on the companion web site http://www.nyupress.org/jewishlife Winner of the 2001-2002 National Jewish Book Award, Reference Winner, Best Reference Resource, 2001, Library Journal Winner, Editor's Choice Award, Reference, 2001, Booklist Winner, Best Reference Book, 2001, Association of Jewish Libraries New York University Press announces with pride the publication of a remarkable project, The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life before and during the Holocaust. Edited by Dr. Shmuel Spector and the late Dr. Geoffrey Wigoder and published in conjunction with Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Remembrance Authority of Israel, the Encyclopedia represents the fruit of more than three decades of labor and stands as one of the most important and ambitious projects the Press has published. Nobel Peace Prize-winner Elie Wiesel contributed the foreword. Today throughout much of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, only fragmentary remnants of once thriving Jewish communities can be found as evidence of more than two thousand years of vibrant Jewish presence among the nations of the world. These communities, many of them ancient, were systematically destroyed by Hitler's forces during the Holocaust. Yet each of their stories-from small village enclaves to large urban centers-is unique in its details and represents one of the countless intertwined threads that comprise the rich tapestry of Jewish history. The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life before and during the Holocaust captures these lost images. In three volumes, it chronicles the people, habits and customs of more than 6,500 Jewish communities that thrived during the early part of the twentieth century only to be changed irrevocably by the war. It clarifies precise locations of settlements based on documents and maps found in recently opened archives; it traces their development through history; it shares small details of everyday life-the culture, the politics, and the faith that inspired the people; and its photographs put faces on the immeasurable loss. Based on decades of research at Yad Vashem, The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life before and during the Holocaust tells the story of thousands of Jewish communities in concise prose, illustrated with maps and poignant images of a world that can no longer be visited. The Encyclopedia is a rich source of information for students, teachers, genealogists and anyone interested in the pageant of Jewish life through the ages. From the Foreword "But the enemy did not only annihilate individuals; his aim was also to destroy our social structures, our economic foundations, religious and secular, our schools, our institutions, our libraries, our workshops, our synagogues, our cultural centers-in a word: our communities. . . . In the Jewish world one knew a town by its Jewish life. Belz and Munkacs, Bialystok and Amsterdam, Kiev and Lille and Zablotow-offering families and individuals a sense of security and countless opportunities for fulfillment, each community had its own particular characteristics and problems, its roots, its challenges, and its ambitions. . . . To understand the extent of the unprecedented crimes committed against the Jewish people in Europe is not enough; one must also seek to understand the life of this people before the catastrophe." —Elie Wiesel Features -Three volumes -1,824 pages -81/2 x 11 -More than 6,500 communities profiled -600 b&w photographs and illustrations -17 pages of maps -21-page glossary -Complete bibliography -Index of communities including alternate spellings and pronunciations -Index of personalities Go to companion web site

Rethinking Poles and Jews

Author: Robert D. Cherry
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742546660
Format: PDF, ePub
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Rethinking Poles and Jews focuses on the role of Holocaust-related material in perpetuating anti-Polish images and describes organizational efforts to combat them. Without minimizing contemporary Polish anti-Semitism, it also presents more positive material on contemporary Polish-American organizations and Jewish life in Poland.

Why Is America Different

Author: Steven T. Katz
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 0761847707
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book brings together a distinguished group of expert scholars from the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University on the main areas of American Jewish life, from colonial Jewish experience to images of Jews in contemporary films. This volume represents the fruit of this collective reflection and interrogation.