The Slaughterhouse Cases

Author: Ronald M. Labbé
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780700614097
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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While ruling that Louisiana had legitimately exercised its powers, the Court's majority went much further to declare that the amendment - and its "due process" and "equal protection" clauses - applied exclusively to the plight of former slaves and, thus, were unavailable to any other American."--BOOK JACKET.

Prigg V Pennsylvania

Author: H. Robert Baker
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780700618644
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Examines the case of Prigg v. Pennsylvania, the 1842 Supreme Court case that struck down the free states' personal liberty laws and reaffirmed federal supremacy in determining the procedures for fugitive slave rendition. The first and only book-length treatment of this landmark case that became a pivot point for antebellum politics and law some fifteen years before Dred Scott.

Marbury V Madison

Author: William Edward Nelson
Publisher: Landmark Law Cases & American
ISBN: 9780700610624
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book is a study of the power of the American Supreme Court to interpret laws and overrule any found in conflict with the Constitution. It examines the landmark case of Marbury versus Madison (1803), when that power of judicial review was first fully articulated.

The reconstruction justice of Salmon P Chase

Author: Harold Melvin Hyman
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The demise of the Confederacy left a legacy of legal arrangements that raised fundamental and vexing questions regarding the legal rights and status of former slaves and the status of former Confederate states. As Harold Hyman shows, few individuals had greater impact on resolving these difficult questions than Salmon P. Chase, chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1865 to 1873.Hyman argues that in two cases -- In Re Turner (1867) and Texas v. White (1869) -- Chase combined his abolitionist philosophy with an activist jurisprudence to help dismantle once and for all the deposed machineries of slavery and the Confederacy.In Re Turner was a private law case decided at the federal circuit level. It involved a black woman's claim that she, a recent slave, was being held in involuntary, servitude. Elizabeth Turner's mother had apprenticed her to their former master, who had not abided by his contractual obligations to provide Elizabeth with training and compensation, substantively keepingher in slavery. Chase's decision, which relied upon due process and equal protection implications in the thirteenth amendment and the 1866 Civil Rights Act, confirmed the rights of emancipated slaves to bargain and contract with employers on a parity with white workers.Texas v. White was a public law case decided in the Supreme Court. It revolved around the issue of whether the holders of U.S. bonds seized and sold by the Confederate state of Texas could demand payment after the war from that state's newly reconstructed government. In effect, Chase and his associate justices were asked to determine the legality of actions committed by all former Confederate states and, thus, to define whatconstituted a state. Chase's opinion reaffirmed the permanence of the Union and its constituent states and the duty of the states to respect the legal rights and obligations of all citizens.Hyman's exemplary study provides

Gideon s Trumpet

Author: Anthony Lewis
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0679723129
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The story of a convict's defense of his contention that a person on trial should not be denied the assistance of counsel

Program

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Lochner V New York

Author: Paul Kens
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780700609192
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Lochner v. New York (1905), which pitted a conservative activist judiciary against a reform-minded legislature, remains one of the most important and most frequently cited cases in Supreme Court history. In this concise and readable guide, Paul Kens shows us why the case remains such an important marker in the ideological battles between the free market and the regulatory state. The Supreme Court's decision declared unconstitutional a New York State law limiting bakery workers to no more than ten hours per day or sixty hours per week. By evoking its "police power," the state hoped to eliminate the employers' abuse of these workers. But the 5-4 majority opinion, authored by Justice Rufus Peckham and renounced by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, cited the state's violation of due process and the "right of contract between employers and employees," which the majority believed was protected by the Fourteenth Amendment. Critics jumped on the decision as an example of conservative juidicial activism promoting laissez-faire capitalism at the expense of progressive reform. As series editors Peter Hoffer and N.E.H. Hull note in their preface, "the case also raised a host of significant questions regarding the impetus of state legislatures to enter the workplace and regulate hours, wages, and working conditions; of the role of courts as monitors of the constitutionality of state regulation of the economy; and of the place of economic and moral theories in judicial thinking." Kens, however, reminds us that these hotly contested ideas and principles emerged from a very real human drama involving workers, owners, legislators, lawyers, and judges. Within the crucible of an industrializing America, their story reflected the fierce competition between two powerful ideologies.